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Playlist: Earth Day

Compiled By: PRX Editors

 Credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/30607051@N00/182143401/">Patrick Boury</a>
Image by: Patrick Boury 
Curated Playlist

Earth Day is April 22.

Below are picks chosen by PRX editorial staff. You can see all Earth Day radio on PRX by using our search.

New In 2020

The Climate Underground

From The Kitchen Sisters | 30:00

Al Gore is back and he’s got a new slide show. Better take heed. Last October the former Vice President, Nobel Prize-winner and Academy Award-winner for An Inconvenient Truth, together with activist, restaurateur, and founder of The Edible Schoolyard, Alice Waters, gathered farmers, ranchers, scientists, chefs, researchers, policymakers on Al's family farm in Carthage, Tennessee for a riveting set of conversations about the role of food and regenerative agriculture in solving the climate crisis. They called the two day event, The Climate Underground.

Along with the conversations, some of Nashville’s hottest chefs and dedicated regenerative farmers joined Alice to create a sustainable organic school lunch for the 350 participants to highlight the power of local, school supported agriculture in nurturing the health of children and the land.

This event happened long before the moment we all find ourselves in right now, as the coronavirus pandemic sweeps across the planet. But it holds the seeds and hope for a different approach to our future and the fate of the planet we all share.

In honor of Earth Day, The Kitchen Sisters Present...The Climate Underground.

Waters_gore_small

Al Gore is back and he’s got a new slide show. Better take heed. Last October the former Vice President, Nobel Prize-winner and Academy Award-winner for An Inconvenient Truth, together with activist, restaurateur, and founder of The Edible Schoolyard, Alice Waters, gathered farmers, ranchers, scientists, chefs, researchers, policymakers on Al's family farm in Carthage, Tennessee for a riveting set of conversations about the role of food and regenerative agriculture in solving the climate crisis. They called the two day event, The Climate Underground.

Along with the conversations, some of Nashville’s hottest chefs and dedicated regenerative farmers joined Alice to create a sustainable organic school lunch for the 350 participants to highlight the power of local, school supported agriculture in nurturing the health of children and the land.

This event happened long before the moment we all find ourselves in right now, as the coronavirus pandemic sweeps across the planet. But it holds the seeds and hope for a different approach to our future and the fate of the planet we all share.

In honor of Earth Day, The Kitchen Sisters Present...The Climate Underground.

Earth Day 50

From Wind & Rhythm | 59:30

On this episode of Wind & Rhythm, we help celebrate the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. We’ll hear music from David Maslanka, Johan de Meij, and Karel Husa, right here at the gathering place for people who love band music.

E568_photo_small_small

This week we are helping to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the very first Earth Day.  Celebrated on the 22nd of April, Earth Day was begun to help spread awareness about environmental issues like clean air and water and the careful stewardship of our natural resources.  We’ll sing to the beauty of the Earth with James Curnow, explore creation myths with Darius Milhaud, do a little dance with Martin Ellerby, warn of impending disaster with Karel Husa, and look to the future with hope with Johan de Meij.   All of that and more here, at the gathering place for people who love band music, Wind & Rhythm. 

Cry Me a River

From The Kitchen Sisters | Part of the Fugitive Waves series | 33:19

Fugitive Waves: Episode 6: Cry Me a River: A story of three pioneering river activist and the damming of wild rivers in the west.  Mark Dubois, co-founder of Friends of the River, Earth Day and International Rivers Network, began as a river guide who opened up rafting trips to disabled people in the 1970's.  Dubois protested the damming and flooding of the Stanislaus  River by hiding himself in the river canyon and chaining himself to a rock as the water rose.  Katie Lee, born 1919, a former Hollywood starlet, ran the Colorado through Glen Canyon long before it was dammed and in 1955 was the 175th person to run the Grand Canyon.  An outspoken conservationist, singer and writer, she has spent her life fighting for rivers.  Ken Sleight, now 83 is a long time river and pack guide and activist in southern Utah who fought and damming of Glen Canyon and filling of Lake Powell.  An inspiration for Ed Abbey's, Monkey Wrench Gang, Sleight is currently working on the campaign to remove Glen Canyon dam.  

Pagan_photo_300_small Fugitive Waves: Episode 6: Cry Me a River: A story of three pioneering river activist and the damming of wild rivers in the west.  Mark Dubois, co-founder of Friends of the River, Earth Day and International Rivers Network, began as a river guide who opened up rafting trips to disabled people in the 1970's.  Dubois protested the damming and flooding of the Stanislaus  River by hiding himself in the river canyon and chaining himself to a rock as the water rose.  Katie Lee, born 1919, a former Hollywood starlet, ran the Colorado through Glen Canyon long before it was dammed and in 1955 was the 175th person to run the Grand Canyon.  An outspoken conservationist, singer and writer, she has spent her life fighting for rivers.  Ken Sleight, now 83 is a long time river and pack guide and activist in southern Utah who fought and damming of Glen Canyon and filling of Lake Powell.  An inspiration for Ed Abbey's, Monkey Wrench Gang, Sleight is currently working on the campaign to remove Glen Canyon dam.  


The Classics

Power Struggle

From WHYY | Part of the The Pulse Specials series | 50:29

What should fuel America? Coal, natural gas, and nuclear are still the undeniable leaders, but sun, wind and water are catching up as clean, renewable alternatives.

Playing
Power Struggle
From
WHYY

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On this episode, The Pulse explores the innovation driving the growth of renewable power sources and the bottlenecks keeping them from grabbing a bigger share of the energy market. Wind, sun ... and cow dung.

What’s the grid, anyway?

The grid transports electricity from power generators to consumers through a complex network of cables. As more renewable energy sources come online, they’re straining the network. Irina Zhorov tracks down one of the third-party entities that manages a section of the eastern power grid.

Wind industry jobs are sweeping into coal country

While some coal mining towns hold tight to the past, other communities are reinventing themselves. From Central Pennsylvania to Virginia, the renewable energy movement is changing lives and identities. Elizabeth Fiedler travelled to Centralia, Pennsylvania, where a decades-old coal fire has pushed residents to find new work and another way of life.

Poop to power

Turning animal dung into electricity is an old technology, but only about 200 farms across the country are doing it. The Environmental Protection Agency says about 8,000 farms have the capability to adopt the technology. Reporter Alan Yu breathed the air with 700 cows on a Central Pennsylvania farm to see the added ingredient that makes cow manure profitable.

Dams and fish: a delicate balance

Hydroelectricity powers the economy in Washington state — but there's a hitch: the dams are in the way of migratory salmon. Eilis O’Neill sent an audio postcard from Wanapum Dam on the mighty Columbia River.

Mimicking nature, an artificial leaf can recycle CO2

In nature green leaves take in carbon dioxide and convert it to usable energy — that’s one way the earth deals with greenhouse gas. Max Green takes a nature walk to understand photosynthesis and ends up in an engineering lab in Chicago, where scientists developed an "artificial leaf" solar cell. It captures carbon and then converts it to useable fuel.

Solar co-ops share information, buying power

Solar panels are cheaper than ever but getting them installed is still a major investment and a daunting undertaking for many homeowners. Joel Wolfram visits with a Philly police officer who joined a neighborhood co-op before switching his home to solar power.

Military power

The Department of Defense is the biggest single energy user in the United States. A few years ago, the department used almost as much power in a year as the entire country of Denmark. We need to fuel up jets, battleships and tanks, but a typical Army outpost in Afghanistan also uses lots of energy. Stephen Gorin from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory explains the push to reduce the military’s power consumption — and how renewables could help keep soldiers safer.

 The future of solar technology

Imagine a future where entire buildings are covered in invisible solar cells only a micron thick. What if people in developing countries — with little access to electricity — could carry solar cells on a piece of paper? Vladimir Bulovic' has some guesses about what it will take to create that solar future. He’s dean of innovation at MIT and part of a team engineering new solar energy possibilities.

HV007- The Earth Sings

From Hearing Voices | Part of the Hearing Voices series | 54:00

Host Dmae Roberts of Stories1st.org, for Earth Day, presents Sounds for and from Mother Earth: The Quiet American takes an audio trek through Nepal"s "Annapurna" Circuit. Host Dmae Roberts records Maori music and culture. We hear Pulse of the Planet's "Extraordinary Sounds From the Natural World." The band Pamyua mimics creature calls. And from Gregg McVicar and the "Earthsongs" series: Sioux Soprano Bonnie Jo Hunt layers opera over insects (on Robbie Robertson’s Music for the Native Americans).

007earthsings200_small Host Dmae Roberts of of Stories1st.org, for Earth Day, presents Sounds for and from Mother Earth:

The Quiet American takes an audio trek through Nepal"s "Annapurna" Circuit.

Host Dmae Roberts records Maori music and culture.

We hear
Pulse of the Planet's "Extraordinary Sounds From the Natural World."

And from Gregg McVicar and the Earthsongs series: Sioux Soprano Bonnie Jo Hunt layers opera over insects (on Robbie Robertson's Music for the Native Americans), and the band Pamyua mimics creature calls.

RISE: Climate Change and Coastal Communities (Series)

Produced by Claire Schoen

RISE is a series of 3 hour-long radio documentaries about the impact of climate change on coastal cities.

Most recent piece in this series:

RISE: Part III Chuey’s Story

From Claire Schoen | Part of the RISE: Climate Change and Coastal Communities series | 59:00

Part_3_photo_small Chuey Cazares has lived all of his 21 years in Alviso, a tiny hamlet jutting into the salt ponds at the southern tip of the San Francisco Bay. Part of a close, extended Chicano family, with hundreds of relatives living in town, Chuey works as a deck hand on a shrimp boat off Alviso's shores.

His town's history — and its future — are defined by water. In the 1800's, farmers drained the aquifer, and the land sank thirteen feet below sea level. Then, the conversion of wetlands to salt ponds made the rivers back up during heavy rains and flooded Alviso. Now sea level rise from the Bay and more rain swelling the rivers threaten more frequent flooding. Chuey's family was traumatized by the last big flood in 1983, and although they fear the next one, they don't want to move anywhere else.

Meanwhile, Mendel Stuart of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working to save Alviso by restoring wetlands. But who is Alviso being saved for? As the flood risk lessens, property values are increasing, making housing in Alviso unaffordable for Chuey and his relatives. And the wetlands conversion has driven his boss's lucrative shrimping business out of the salt ponds.

While we must adapt to the impacts of climate change that we can no longer halt, Chuey's story dramatizes that climate change will create both winners and losers in the short term.

Back Home Again with John Denver

From Charlie Warren | 58:47

An extensive journal of the life and music of one of the most creative and popular performers of the late 20th Century.

Eyeing_the_pass__for_prx__small John Denver's music and comments about his life as a songwriter and performer, as revealed in interviews and his songs.  Includes top hit recordings and those less familiar, but revealing, meaningful, and sometimes humorous.  We're also reminded of his life as a husband, father, environmentalist, and adventurer.

The Great Outdoors

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | Part of the CBC Radio's Outfront series | 53:28

CBC Radio's Outfront presents four stories that are all about fields and ponds, love and loss. In short, the great outdoors.

Flowers_logo-_final_small Poetry of the Woods produced by Steve Wadhams
Until they went on a hike in the woods, many of Julie Berry's grade six students in St. Thomas, Ontario, had never seen tadpoles or toads -- nor had they written poetry about flowers, rickety bridges, "vicious frogs," and "birds that fly up to heaven".

Stormy Weather produced by Steve Wadhams
One person is terrified of thunder and lightning. Another finds comfort in endless heavy rain. And a woman remembers driving across the prairies many years ago under dark purple skies on a journey of escape, elation and despair.

One Blue Canoe produced by Carma Jolly
A blue canoe is hidden in a shed in Ontario cottage country. It was used once in June 1978 and then forgotten by most. But Barbara Greaney remembers. Her son Davie was in the canoe when tragedy struck. An accident on Lake Timiskaming took his life along with 12 others. Now after more than 25 years, Barbara Greaney is taking the canoe out of the shed and paddling in it for herself.

One Step and Then Another produced by Lindsay Michael 

Ever since piKe krpan left her home in Alberta as a teenager, her mom Helen has written her special letters. Like a secret code, piKe always finds newspaper clippings about local bear attacks and sightings folded inside.

After hiking in the Rockies with her mom for years, piKe finally begins to understand what the clippings might mean about long-distance mothering.

Humankind: Passengers (Hour One)

From Humankind | 59:02

This sound-rich documentary series examines how our personal transportation choices - private cars vs. public transit - can have a significant impact on climate change. And with rising gas prices here at home, and instability in the Middle East, what effect do our choices have on America’s dependence upon foreign oil? Hour two is here.

Passengers_small Our love affair with the car has dramatically shaped the American landscape. But along with personal mobility, we endure high gas prices, lengthy stop-and-go commutes, urban sprawl, smog and greenhouse emissions. In two sound-rich hours presented by award-winning documentary producer David Freudberg, listeners will learn the emerging role public transportation may play in alleviating these problems, now and in the future.


HOUR 1.
Segment 1: The story of a Virginia man who accepted his county's "challenge" to go car-free for a month; plus voices of motorists filling up at the pump; bus riders in a low-income neighborhood and others.
Segment 2: Business people and environmentalists come together: improved public transportation helps to grow the economy, for lots of reasons. Bankers and the Sierra Club on the same side. Also: why many young people are flocking to public transit.
A former Shell Oil executive recently told NPR he expects gas prices to top $5/gallon by the end of 2011. The last time oil prices spiked (2008), ridership on public transit surged all over the United States because commuting by car had become too costly. At the same time, a new wave of young people are now flocking to transit, many citing environmental reasons and a desire to read, write, listen and watch on portable technology -- instead of fighting traffic behind the wheel.

But transit faces an uphill battle. In many systems, the recession has inflicted both service reductions and fare increases. In Chicago, for example, nearly 20% of service was cut in 2010, yet ridership declined less than 1%. Many people depend on buses and trains. A third of us, including low-income and elderly Americans, lack access to a car. Will federal aid come to the rescue, or will transit be trimmed further in budgetary belt-tightening?


Note the final episode of this series, see Humankind: Passengers (Hour Two).

Making Peace With Nature After Environmental Disasters: Peace Talks Radio (59:00 / 54:00)

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 59:02

Reflecting on the 2010 Gulf Oil Spill, three people, who have placed their relationship with nature at the center of their lives, offer their thoughts on how we can make peace with nature.

Oil-spill_small When the British Petroleum Deepwater Horizon Oil Rig exploded in April of 2010 and set off the largest accidental marine oil spill in history, virtually everyone viewing the disruption, to wildlife and the lives of people in that region, was devastated.  We felt like it probably set off an inner conflict in many about human’s relationship with nature.  For today’s program, we sought out some voices of people who have already placed that relationship at the center of their lives to see how their experiences and thinking might help us all grapple with this conflict.  A lot of the headlines during the three months when the oil gushed into the gulf framed the event as an attack or war on nature.  How can we think and act to make peace with nature. 

Today we speak with Daniel Schwartz, a social ecology professor; Kathy Sanchez, a Native American environmental policy activist; and John Francis whose response to an oil spill in 1971 was to quit riding in motorized vehicles for 22 years, walk all across the country and, during 17 of those years, not to speak a word.  In all that time he completed bachelor’s masters and phd degrees in land management.  Carol Boss hosts with Paul Ingles.

There is also a 29 minute version of this program on PRX: http://www.prx.org/pieces/53564

Aldo Leopold and the Emerging Land Ethic (59:00 / 54:00 - Free Program)

From Jack Loeffler | 58:59

A celebration of the life Aldo Leopold, the man who wrote “A Sand County Almanac” in 1949, and introduced Ethics as the fundamental concept that should underlie all consideration regarding use of land and water. A great choice for Earth Day.

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Aldo Leopold and the Emerging Land Ethic is a one-hour program that celebrates the life of the man who wrote “A Sand County Almanac” in 1949.  That book includes his essay, “The Land Ethic” that is considered the capstone of the reflections of the great mind and spirit of the man who forwarded the realization that conscience and consciousness are far more vital  than economics when considering the landscape.  Leopold began his career as a forest ranger in the American Southwest, and went on to reconfigure conservationist perspective  through the practice of restoration ecology. 

The program includes the voices Leopold’s daughters Nina and Estella Leopold, as well as scholars, environmental activists and writers who have been greatly influenced by the man regarded by many as the greatest conservationist of the 20th Century.  Also heard are environmental historian Susan Flader, activist Dave Foreman, author, environmentalist William deBuys, former Secretary of the Interior Stewart Udall, and many others whose thinking and practices have been deeply influenced by the genius of Aldo Leopold.   The program was produced by Jack Loeffler.   

Audrey and Frank Peterman

From American Public Media | Part of the The Promised Land series | 54:00

If Frank and Audrey Peterman have their way, many more of their fellow black Americans will visit our national parks. They take host Majora Carter to Yosemite, where she crawls through a hundred-foot cave and meets Yosemite’s only black park ranger.

Peterman_3adjusted

On a 10-week tour of 16 national parks in 1995, Frank and Audrey Peterman were awed by the beauty of America and warmed by the friendliness of fellow campers. But among all of the park tourists, the Petermans saw only two fellow African-Americans.

After discovering that many blacks felt no connection with the parks, the Petermans took action: they started a program called “Keeping It Wild,” aimed at encouraging black Americans to visit the nation’s parks and other public lands that they help pay for with tax dollars. As Frank notes, “If you are not involving the communities who will make up a larger percentage of the voting population in the future, how do you then expect them to make decisions that will protect these places for posterity?”

H
ost Majora Carter joins the Petermans and a group of teens from inner-city Houston as they crawl through a wondrous 100-foot cave in Yosemite. And we meet Shelton Johnson, Yosemite’s only black park ranger, who is quick to point out that less than 1 percent of the park’s visitors are African-American — a statistic that’s bound to change if Frank and Audrey Peterman have their way.

Traveling the Earth Gently

From Liner Notes | Part of the LINER NOTES series | 58:30

A special edition of Liner Notes focused on the environment and suitable as an Earth Day special.
We'll hear environmentalists dreaming and penguins complaining; we'll get close to a glacier giving way and discuss that method of travel with two very small carbon footprints: walking. Guests include travel writer Jan Morris, author Simon Winchester, science reporter Daniel Grossman, film director Werner Herzog and environmentalist Bill McKibben.

Tapantinationalparkprx_small We'll hear environmentalists dreaming, penguins complaining, get close to a glacier giving way and discuss that method of travel with two very small carbon footprints: walking? Guests include JAN MORRIS, the world's foremost travel writer; author SIMON WINCHESTER; science reporter Daniel Grossman, film director Werner Herzog and environmentalist BILL MCKIBBEN. Production of LINER NOTES is made possible through the generous support of Cunard Line: classic British ocean liners offering a most civilized adventure.

BEAT LATINO 023: CELEBRATING EARTH DAY

From Catalina Maria Johnson | 59:10

A musical celebration of our planet: Earth Day, Latino-style.

Beatlatino-pachamama_small Beat Latino, hosted and produced by Catalina Maria Johnson, celebrates in every hour a different facet of the extraordinary diversity of the Latin/Latino musical universe.

This special hour of Beat Latino presents melodies and songs in celebration of Earth Day: from rocking eco-anthems in favor of universal water rights by Latin alternative musicians Aterciopelados from Colombia, to traditional indigenous melodies about the beauty of nature in its flowers and birds - there´s music from all corners of the Latin and Latino musical universe to celebrate our planet's many marvels.

Beat Latino is hosted in both Spanish and English, so that most who would appreciate the music can also enjoy the information.

Broadcasts very nicely around Earth Day, April 22.

Stories from the Heart of the Land (Series)

Produced by Atlantic Public Media

A 6-part series featuring intimate stories about the human connection to land and landscape. Host Jay Allison asked dozens of public radio's best producers to do something different. He asked, "If you could tell any story about people and the natural world, what would it be?" ...and off they went:

- Elizabeth Arnold went to the woods with grizzly bears.
- Dan Collison and Elizabeth Meister stalked coqui frogs in Hawaii.
- The Kitchen Sisters went to the river's edge.
- Barrett Golding jumped on his bike.
- Scott Carrier walked with pilgrims around a mountain in Tibet.
- Jonathan Goldstein packed a tent and went camping, reluctantly.
- Sean Cole turned on his TV. Don't worry, it was a nature show.

Most recent piece in this series:

Stories from the Heart of the Land VI - Depending on Nature

From Atlantic Public Media | Part of the Stories from the Heart of the Land series | 54:04

Prxfile128640_small DEPENDING ON NATURE We're all dependent on the land, although some people feel that connection more keenly than others. Those are the people we'll hear from in the next hour. We hear from people planting stones for posterity and gathering peace from emptiness, people who commit to a patch of land, invest their energy, and hope for a harvest but not necessarily in any way you'd expect. 1. Wild Crafting Vermont For more than 25 years, Nova Kim and Les Hook have made a living by foraging the woods of Northern Vermont. Produced by Emily Botein. 2. Graun em i Laif Papua New Guinea After a rootless childhood and a hopscotch youth, Skye Rohde settles down in Papua New Guinea and discovers what it's like to belong to the land. 3. Stone by Stone Lake District, United Kingdom For twenty years, rain or shine, Andrew Loudon has been building stone walls in the Lake District. Produced by Kim Normanton. 4. Faith in Fishermen Stonington, Maine These things are clear about Maine fishermen: They keep secrets. And they distrust scientists. Unless, of course, you're Ted Ames, who is both fisherman and scientist. Produced by Neenah Ellis. 5. Desert Blooms Arizona Charles Bowden on the ecstasy of Selenicereus plerantus, which offers its bloom on just one night - the hottest and blackest of the year. Produced by Jeff Rice. 6. Elbow Room Alaska, China and Mongolia How much land does a person need? Elizabeth Arnold, who lives in Alaska, goes in search of even more wide-open space and ends up with a case of claustrophobia in Outer Mongolia. Original Music for the series was composed and performed by Bill Frisell NB: ALL PROMOS INTERCHANGEABLE (even those with titles) you can pick and choose. :15 promos need "...Join host Jay Allison for Stories from the heart of the Land" tag. Funding: Supported by The Nature Conservancy and Visa. Contact: Deborah Blakeley - blakeley@pclink.com 612-377-1207

Ice- Part One

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | 54:00

Episode 1 - Ice and the evolution of life on Earth.

In_praise_of_ice_small Episode 1 - Ice and the Evolution of Life on Planet Earth

In the beginning, there was no ice and certainly no life on the Earth. This newborn planet was churning and searing hot, far too hot for ice, or even liquid water. But as the dust settled, and the heat began to subside, ice arrived on earth with a bang!

The oldest relics of life on earth, aside from some traces of chemicals, are fossils of single cell microbes. They’re found locked in rock from the Pre Cambrian Era, dating back more than three billion years. Today, in the Arctic and Antarctica, the coldest places on earth, microbes that look very similar flourish in those icy worlds.

The Cyanobacteria are especially dazzling. “Cyano” means blue in Greek which is why they’re are also known as Blue Green Algae.

About 2 million years ago, The Pleistocene Era was about to begin and the Earth was looking much more like the world we live in today. There were flowers, grasses and trees, reptiles, and fish, insects, birds and mammals, including apes who were the ancestors of us Humans.

These primates lived in Africa, as Hunter Gatherers. But they weren’t the only apes in Africa at that time. There were also refugees from Europe and Asia who’d escaped the Ice Sheets that were creeping South. And it wasn’t only Eurasia that was covered in ice. Much of North America was too.

When we think about that period today, we call it The Ice Age. Towards the end of the Ice Age, some of our tropical ancestors moved into Europe, and into the cold. They had the brains to survive - and thrive - in hostile environments their bodies weren’t really built for.

Around 25,000 years ago, the last big freeze-up of the Pleistocene Ice Age was drawing to a close. The Earth was heading towards the warm Interglacial Period that we’re living in today. Eventually, even the Americas were occupied by Humans.

Ice- Part Two

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | 54:00

Episode 2 - The opportunities & challenges of life with ice in the 21st century.

Martha-l-black_small Episode 2 - The Opportunities & Challenges of Life With Ice in the 21st Century

Ice is beautiful and complex, which makes it ideal for the different games we play on it. People who know ice, and work with it, can exploit that complexity and tailor the properties of ice to meet their exacting standards.

In sports arenas, unlike the great outdoors, the climate can be adjusted and controlled. This allows ice-makers to achieve their goal: making perfect ice for skaters, curlers and hockey players.

The art of ice-making, is based on science. Water normally freezes at zero degrees Celsius. In this new solid state, we call it “ice”. But ice is not entirely solid. There’s always a little layer of liquid water, floating on it. Water also expands as it freezes, with enough force to burst pipes and even rocks when it turns to ice. And because these molecules are less crowded (or less densely packed), ice is also lighter than water. This is why icebergs can float on water.

The Martha L. Black is a Canadian Coastguard Icebreaker that clears shipping lanes on the St. Lawrence River, just past Quebec City. Navigation is tight here. Ships, ferries and bridges loom out of the fog, and the river
is paved with ice. It could easily puncture the hull of an ordinary vessel.

Ice is magical and romantic, even when it torments us! No matter who we are, or where we live in this country, we all learn to live with ice. Assuming of course there’s ice around for us to live “with”…

These days, you’d be hard-pressed to find anyone who hasn’t heard that ice is melting around the Poles. But it turns out, there’s more to it than sea ice. Glaciers are also moving, at unprecedented speeds.
Now that it’s melting and threatens to vanish from our world, the new frontier is in outer space, which ironically is where ice came from in the first place, before it even got to earth. And so it goes…


Half-Hour (24:00-30:00)

Sounding the Alarm: Noise Pollution

From Making Contact | Part of the Making Contact series | 29:00

Noise pollution is a growing problem. Effecting everything from the lives of people living under airplane flight paths, to marine life. On this edition, we’ll hear from people struggling to be heard over the din of our noisy modern life and ask, is there anywhere left in the world you can get some peace and quiet?

Mc_podcast_logo_300dpi-01_small

Noise pollution is a growing problem. Effecting everything from the lives of people living under airplane flight paths, to marine life. On this edition, we’ll hear from people struggling to be heard over the din of our noisy modern life and ask, is there anywhere left in the world you can get some peace and quiet?

 

 

Oh Coqui!

From Long Haul Productions | Part of the Song/Story series | 25:06

The Coqui, a tiny, but very vociferous tree frog, is the national symbol of Puerto Rico, beloved in folklore and in song. But while the coqui’s lusty “croak” is a beloved part of the Puerto Rican soundscape, lulling residents to sleep every night, it’s a different story on the big island of Hawaii. Coquis showed up on the island as stowaways a few years back. And because the frog has no natural predator there, they’re proliferating like crazy.

Coqui_175_med_small The Coqui, a tiny, but very vociferous tree frog, is the national symbol of Puerto Rico, beloved in folklore and in song. But while the coqui’s lusty “croak” is a beloved part of the Puerto Rican soundscape, lulling residents to sleep every night, it’s a different story on the big island of Hawaii. Coquis showed up on the island as stowaways a few years back. And because the frog has no natural predator there, they’re proliferating like crazy…'taking over' some locals would say. Dan Collison and Elizabeth Meister - with the help of the musical group Dr Jerky and Mr big - have the story of Hawaii’s reaction to the coqui’s invasion

Hollow Victory

From Helen Borten | Part of the A Sense of Place series | 30:01

A David and Goliath battle against a mining technique that blows off mountaintops, buries streams and destroys communities in the hollows of West Virginia.

Barbershopquintet_small "Hollow Victory" was included in the second season of A SENSE OF PLACE, distributed by PRI in 2001. It is a David and Goliath story about people living in the hollows of West Virginia and fighting Big Coal in an attempt to save their homes, their streams and their mountains. The battle against "mountaintop removal", the strip mining technique that blows off mountaintops, also pits miners against former miners and miners' widows and reaches the federal courts where, even today, it remains stalled. One :30 promo (click "listen" page, promo labeled "Segment 2")


Segments (9:00-23:59)

Episode 5: Venus and Us: Two Stories of Climate Change

From PRX | Part of the Transistor series | 17:32

Space scientists are acutely aware of what can happen when climates change in other parts of our solar system. Take Venus, where it rains sulfuric acid and is 900°F on the surface, but it wasn’t always that way. Astrophysicist Michelle Thaller talks with a NASA expert on Venus about how the planet became a hellscape. And she talks with the Library of Congress’ inaugural chair of astrobiology about how to grasp this new geologic era where humans cause rapid change.

Image__1__small Space scientists are acutely aware of what can happen when climates change in other parts of our solar system. Take Venus, where it rains sulfuric acid and is 900°F on the surface, but it wasn’t always that way. Astrophysicist Michelle Thaller talks with a NASA expert on Venus about how the planet became a hellscape. And she talks with the Library of Congress’ inaugural chair of astrobiology about how to grasp this new geologic era where humans cause rapid change.

Trekking to the North Pole

From Greenpeace Podcast | Part of the Greenpeace Podcast Segments series | 11:02

In the spring of 2013 four people went on a trek to the North Pole with a message.

Frozenface_small In the spring of 2013 four people went on a trek to the North Pole with a message.

Humpback Whale Song

From Heidi Chang | 09:49

Why do humpback whales sing? Some researchers are trying to solve that mystery as they take you on a wild adventure in Hawaii. Experience some close encounters with humpback whales and their haunting songs.

Humpback_small Each year, ten thousand North Pacific humpback whales migrate from their summer feeding grounds off Alaska to spend the winter and spring in Hawaii. It's the home of the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary--the only place where humpbacks reproduce in the United States.

Over the past decade, Canadian scientist Jim Darling has been coming to Hawaii to try to solve the puzzle of why humpback whales sing. Since he's been recording and studying whale song, he's made some amazing discoveries. Darling has been researching whale song along with world-renowned whale photographer Flip Nicklin.  Their work has been featured in National Geographic.  The photo on this page, showing a singing whale by a hydrophone, is by Flip Nicklin. 

Great story for Earth Day on April 22 or to air in the Winter or Spring.
Two Versions: 9:49 and 8:01 in length

This piece was originally broadcast on Living on Earth in 2002, and has been updated and remixed for PRX.  It won the 2002 Society of Professional Journalists Hawaii Chapter Excellence In Journalism Award for General News/Enterprise Reporting.

The Story of Earth

From Bishop Sand | Part of the Sift series | 14:32

The surprising history of the earth and life's impact on it. Also, a new perspective on the future of the planet: earth will likely be in constant change.

Origin_logo_small The secrets of earth's early history (known as the Hadean period) have only recently been discovered thanks to the efforts of scientists like Steve Mojzsis. In this episode, Mojzsis talks about what it must have been like on the "peculiar" early earth. Other scientists weigh in on how life changed the planet a little later. Finally, a perspective of the future of the ever-changing planet.

Voices:
Bob Hazen - Carnegie Institution and George Mason University
Stephen Mojzsis - Colorado University and Universite Claude Bernard Lyon
Ben Oppenheimer - American Natural History Museum
Ariel Anbar - Arizona State University 

Summit '63 - The First American Tops Mt. Everest

From Charlie Warren | 21:25

A dramatic retelling of the challenging 1963 American expedition to climb the world's highest mountain. Narrator Charlie Warren, with the written words and voice of mountaineer Jim Whittaker, honors the effort and sacrifice Jim, his comrade climbers, and Sherpa exhibited to empower Jim to become the first American to top the highest point on Earth.

Gettyimages_aa036497_small A vivid sound-picture narrative reliving the peril, promise and ultimate success of the climb.  Narrator Charlie Warren, with the written words and voice of mountaineer Jim Whittaker, honors the effort and sacrifice Jim, his comrade climbers, and Sherpa exhibited to empower Jim to become the first American to top the highest point on Earth.

Storm Over the Mountain

From Eileen McAdam | 16:41

There was a time when pollution by corporations went relatively unchecked until a small group of concerned citizens decided to fight back. Their struggle launched the modern environmental movement. It happened in the Hudson Valley and it all began with an image.

Mehp_banner3_small We take it for granted that you can defend scenic beauty, wildlife and the environment with the power of the law. But there was a time when pollution by corporations went relatively unchecked until a small group of concerned citizens decided to fight back. Their struggle launched the modern environmental movement. It happened in the Hudson Valley and it all began with an image. An inspiring fun piece that celebrates the men and women who fought for 17 years to protect the Hudson River.

Garbage Man-Long Version

From Richard Paul | Part of the People Who Work series | 09:00

A DC trashman talks frankly about his life and work. Also in a four-minute version.

Trashtrucksm_small Whenever governments -- especially local governments -- cut back, there's always a lot of talk about "essential services" .... The ones everyone expects to be performed. This is a look at someone who performs one of those "essential services." Arguably one of the most important. But not one any of us really likes to think about much. Producer Richard Paul spent the day with a man nicknamed "Motor Mouth" who collects Washington DC's trash. CLOSE: Albert M. Roe, Junior -- better known to his colleagues as "Motor Mouth" -- collects trash in Washington, DC. Our series on people who work is produced by Richard Paul.


Cutaways (5:00-8:59)

Forest to Desert

From Sarah Boothroyd | 02:35

An audio musing on the phrase: "Humankind is preceded by forest, and followed by desert."

Forest_to_desert_-_image_2_small This short sound artwork was inspired by the Third Coast Festival's 2008 audio challenge.

The Man who Named 'Earth Day'

From Reid Frazier | 06:30

Who came up with the name 'Earth Day'? It turns out, a legendary Madison Avenue ad man named Julian Koenig. He was responsible for some of the most famous ads of all time, and helped give the environmental movement and enduring brand.

Koenig Who came up with the name 'Earth Day'? It turns out, a legendary Madison Avenue ad man named Julian Koenig. He was responsible for some of the most famous ads of all time, and helped give the environmental movement and enduring brand.

Eating Close to Home

From Atlantic Public Media | 07:42

Bill McKibben decides to eat only food grown locally. In the winter. In Vermont.

Dsc4486_small Author and enviromentalist Bill McKibben goes an entire winter eating only foods from the Lake Champlain valley in Vermont -- and learns lessions about the global food system. EXCERPT: TOP OF PIECE McKIBBEN: The apples in my market annoy me. They're from China and New Zealand and Washington state, and I live in Vermont's Champlain Valley, one of the world's great apple-growing regions. So, what an annoying waste of energy to fly these Red Delicious in from halfway around the planet. And what a waste of taste?these things have been bred for just one purpose-- endurance. Mostly, though, they're annoying because they don't come with connections, with stories. They've been grown on ten thousand-acre plantations with the latest industrial methods and the highest possible efficiency. They're cheap, I give you that. But they're so dull. [HUMMING SOUND OF CIDER PRESS] McKIBBEN: The roar you hear is a cider press. It belongs to my neighbor, Bill Suhr. His fifty-acre orchard produced a million pounds of apples last year, so he's not a backyard hobbyist. SUHR: This time of year we're putting six varieties in: the Macintosh, Empire, Cortland, Macoun, Northern Spy, and Jonagold. McKIBBEN: I drank a lot of Bill Suhr's cider this past winter because I'd asked the editors at Gourmet magazine if I could perform an experiment: could I make it through the winter feeding myself entirely on the food of this northern New England valley where I live. Up until 75 years ago or so, everyone who lived here obviously ate close to home?an orange or a banana was a Christmas-time treat. And that's still how most people on the planet eat. But I knew that most of the infrastructure that once made that possible was now missing. Our food system operates on the principle that it's always summer somewhere, so it's forgotten how to get through winter. How many houses have a root cellar? Not mine. If I was going to make it, I would need to make connections with my neighbors. ...continued in Eating Local Food

Green Ethics (Series)

Produced by Carnegie Council

Green Ethics is a series of programming from the Carnegie Council focusing on climate change, energy and sustainability.

Most recent piece in this series:

The Impact of Dependence on Oil

From Carnegie Council | Part of the Green Ethics series | 02:00

Globalethicscorner_logo1_small

Created and managed by Carnegie Council Ethics Studio and written by Senior Fellow William Vocke, Global Ethics Corner is a weekly 2 minute segment devoted to newsworthy ethical issues.

Seed to Seed

From Salt Institute for Documentary Studies | 06:37

Will Bonsall of Industry, Maine has spent decades working to prevent further loss of food crop diversity.

Scatterseed__062_small His Scatterseed Project is an attempt to collect, preserve, and distribute rare and heirloom seed varieties. With over 3,000 different varieties its the largest effort of it’s kind in the country.

QUEST (Series)

Produced by KQED

KQED's QUEST is a new multimedia series about the people involved in San Francisco Bay area science and environmental issues and how their work is changing the way we live. Do you know what is in your own backyard?

Most recent piece in this series:

Coho Survival

From KQED | Part of the QUEST series | 05:10

Playing
Coho Survival
From
KQED

Questlogo_small Coho salmon conservationists are losing hope they’ll see large numbers of the endangered fish return to spawn this year, even after our recent rains. They say the future looks grim following three years of drought and they’re looking for ways to stop the coho from being sucked into what they call “the vortex of extinction.” 

This I Believe - Joy Harjo

From This I Believe | Part of the This I Believe series | 03:24

Native American poet tells of her belief in the Sun and our sacred connection to it.

Tiblogosmall_small HOST: In "Eagle Poem," poet Joy Harjo writes, "To pray, you open your whole self to sky, to earth, to Sun, to Moon." It is in the heavens that Harjo finds her belief. A native of Tulsa, Oklahoma, now living in Hawaii, Harjo is a member of the Muskogee Creek Nation. Here she is with her essay for This I Believe. HARJO: I believe in the sun. In the tangle of human failures of fear, greed, and forgetfulness, the sun gives me clarity. When explorers first encountered my people, they called us heathens, sun worshippers. They didn't understand that the sun is a relative, and illuminates our path on this earth. Many of us continue ceremonies that ensure a connection with the sun. After dancing all night in a circle we realize that we are a part of a larger sense of stars and planets dancing with us overhead. When the sun rises at the apex of the ceremony, we are renewed. There is no mistaking this connection, though WalMart might be just down the road. Humans are vulnerable and rely on the kindnesses of the earth and the sun; we exist together in a sacred field of meaning. A few weeks ago I visited some friends at a pueblo for a feast day celebration. The runners were up at dawn and completed a ceremonial run that ensures that the sun will continue to return. It is a humble and necessary act of respect. And because the celebration continues, the sun, the earth and these humans are still together in a harmonious relationship. Our earth is shifting. We can all see it. I hear from my Inuit and Yupik relatives up north that everything has changed. It's so hot; there is not enough winter. Animals are confused. Ice is melting. The quantum physicists have it right; they are beginning to think like Indians: everything is connected dynamically at an intimate level. When you remember this, then the current wobble of the earth makes sense. How much more oil can be drained without replacement, without reciprocity? One day, recently I walked out of a hotel room just off Times Square at dawn to find the sun. It was the fourth morning since the birth of my fourth granddaughter. This was the morning I was to present her to the sun, as a relative, as one of us. It was still dark, overcast as I walked through Times Square. I stood beneath a 21st century totem pole of symbols of multinational corporations, made of flash and neon. The sun rose up over the city but I couldn't see it amidst the rain. Though I was not at home, bundling up the baby to carry her outside, I carried this newborn girl within the cradleboard of my heart. I held her up and presented her to the sun, so she would be recognized as a relative, so that she won't forget this connection, this promise, so that we all remember the sacredness of life.

A Poem Lovely as a Tree

From Sarah Elzas | 04:34

This piece explores Joyce Kilmer's 'Trees' through readings, music and interviews with Kilmer's grandson and others.

Kilmer_small "I think that I shall never see/ A poem lovely as a tree" is the first line of Joyce Kilmer's most famous poem, "Trees". It is read at arbor day celebrations; it has been set to music several times; and it is taught in elementary schools around the country. It is loved, but also mocked as a simplistic poem, lacking in substance--there is even an annual bad poetry contest named after him at Columbia University. This piece explores 'Trees' through readings, music and interviews with Kilmer's grandson and others. For a profile of Kilmer, please see "Joyce Kilmer and Trees", also on PRX: www.prx.org/pieces/8584

Eco-therapy for war vets

From Northwest News Network (N3) | 03:25

A novel program under the Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs uses nature to heal the wounds of war.

Default-piece-image-2 Individual states are stepping up to provide more help to returning soldiers and sailors. A novel program under the Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs uses nature to heal the wounds of war. Vets also get experience in environmental restoration that could lead to a good civilian job. Correspondent Tom Banse has more from suburban Seattle. (3:24... soq)

Part 1: A Long History of Dioxin Delays

From The Environment Report | Part of the Dioxin Delays series | 03:40

Shawn Allee meets a man who took the Dow and dioxin issue to Congress years ago and is shocked it hasn't been dealt with. This is the first in a five-part series from The Environment Report.

Valdas_adamkus_small Dioxin pollution has been present in a watershed in central Michigan for more than thirty years.  People around the country might think it's just a local issue, but there was a time when this very same pollution problem made national news.  Shawn Allee met the man who took the issue to Congress and who feels it should make news again.


Interstitials (Under 2:00)

Earth Day

From BirdNote | 01:45

Northern Bobwhite ... Evening Grosbeaks ... Boreal Chickadees ... Common Terns ... and Northern Pintails, like this one ... the populations of all are in decline, mostly due to habitat loss. On Earth Day, join those who are finding ways to conserve the natural resources that sustain the full community of life, for people and birds. Join your local Audubon. Volunteer to help remove invasive plants. Visit a national park or refuge. Buy a Duck Stamp. There are many ways to get involved and help #BringBirdsBack!

Playing
Earth Day
From
BirdNote

Thumbnail_small Northern Bobwhite ... Evening Grosbeaks ... Boreal Chickadees ... Common Terns ... and Northern Pintails, like this one ... the populations of all are in decline, mostly due to habitat loss. On Earth Day, join those who are finding ways to conserve the natural resources that sustain the full community of life, for people and birds. Join your local Audubon. Volunteer to help remove invasive plants. Visit a national park or refuge. Buy a Duck Stamp. There are many ways to get involved and help #BringBirdsBack!