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Playlist: Labor Day

Compiled By: PRX Editors

Curated Playlist

Labor Day is Monday, Sept. 7.

Below are picks chosen by PRX editorial staff. You can see all potential Labor Day pieces by using our search.

Hour (49:00-1:00:00)

And Nothing Less: The Untold Stories of Women's Fight for the Vote

From PRX | 51:58

In the centennial year of the 19th Amendment, Rosario Dawson and Retta guide us through the fight for women’s voting rights, a history that resonates now more than ever.

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"Men their rights and nothing more; women their rights and nothing less.” Written by suffragists Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, women’s rights activists used this rallying cry to demand voting equality. But the suffrage movement included far more voices and perspectives than these two well-known names: throughout the fight for women’s right to vote, generations of diverse activists demanded full access to the ballot box. Hosts Rosario Dawson and Retta guide us through this hour-long special, bringing us the stories we didn’t learn in our history books.

And Nothing Less is a production of the Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commission, the National Park Service, and PRX. This hour is an adaptation of the official podcast commemorating 100 years of the 19th Amendment and women's constitutional right to vote.

College in the Time of Coronavirus

From Innovation Hub | Part of the Holiday Specials series | 58:29

On this Labor Day Innovation Hub special, we tackle all the ways that college has been changing in response to not only the pandemic, but also to the changing needs and values of students. Plus, when cases of COVID-19 go up as students come back to college, who's to blame? Students? Or the schools themselves?

Innova13_000_logo114697438_medium_small We tackle all the ways that college has been changing in response to not only the pandemic, but also to the changing needs and values of students. Plus, when cases of COVID-19 go up as students come back to college, who's to blame? Students? Or the schools themselves?

Political Junkie - Great Moments in Presidential Debates (2020)

From Ken Rudin's Political Junkie | Part of the Political Junkie (Specials) series | 53:56

Join Political Junkie Ken Rudin for a review of many great moments from the history of televised presidential debates, with commentary from several journalists and historians on how those moments may have helped pave the way for the winner to reach the White House.

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In 1960, the first televised presidential debates were held between John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon, giving voters a unique opportunity to see the two candidates up close. Since 1976, all the major party nominees for president have participated in televised debates. The issues ranged from domestic concerns to foreign policy. But these debates are also remembered to many dramatic moments and memorable gaffes that have often helped decide the outcome of the elections.

Join Political Junkie Ken Rudin for a review of many of these great moments from past presidential debates, with commentary from several journalists and historians on how those moments may have helped pave the way for the winner to reach the White House.

Ken's guests include: 

  • Bob Schieffer, former moderator of CBS’ Face the Nation and moderator of debates in 2004, 2008 and 2012
  • Marvin Kalb, former CBS and NBC News correspondent; panelist in second 1984 presidential debate
  • Jon Margolis, former Washington correspondent for The Chicago Tribune; panelist in 1988 VP debate
  • Alan Schroeder, journalism professor at Northeastern University and author of Presidential Debates: Risky Business on the Campaign Trail
  • Diaries of a Divided Nation 2020

    From KCRW | 52:58

    Diaries of a Divided Nation: 2020 is a people’s history of the United States recorded in real time.

    Divided-nation-2020-_294x210__small Over the past year, a team of audio journalists have documented the lives of seven ordinary people with different views, living in different places, and with different stakes in politics. Each participant has recorded their thoughts and experiences as the extraordinary events of 2020 have unfolded. These are their stories. 

    American Routes Live for Labor Day Weekend

    From American Routes | Part of the American Routes Specials series | 01:58:59

    New for 2020: American Routes Live for Labor Day Weekend features great recordings of live performances from the beloved French Quarter Festival in New Orleans.

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    In light of response to the historic American Routes Live Independence Day concert from the National Mall on July 4th weekend, we are presenting American Routes Live for Labor Day Weekend. The two-hour special is available to all PRX stations free of charge.
    (The 345 stations that carry American Routes weekly don’t need to subscribe to this special.) 
    American Routes Live for Labor Day Weekend features great recordings of live performances from the beloved French Quarter Festival in New Orleans. It's all part of our new focus on great, live original performance recordings.
    We celebrate work in these tough times by playing joyous music from the streets and stages of New Orleans French Quarter. Whether you're working at home or away, maintaining the household or searching for employment, we offer a break this Labor Day weekend with a homegrown soundscape of traditional jazz, brass bands, zydeco, Latin, soul and funk.     
       
    It's live music from the city's oldest neighborhood.. We'll hear from trumpeter Kermit Ruffins, Creole jazz banjo man Don Vappie, zydeco accordionist Sunpie and the Sunspots, the all-female Original Pinettes Brass Band, Latin rockers the Iguanas, and trombonist Corey Henry's Tremé Funket. 
    Join American Routes for cool music to chill by or dance to for the working women and men of our United States.
    American Routes Live for Labor Day Weekend 

    Work 'n Music - A Labor Day Weekend Special

    From Charlie Warren | 58:57

    Updated for 2020. From mining to manufacturing, housework to ranching, hear the factual history and realities of American labor, wages, employment, progress, quitting, firing, and hiring, surrounded by songs about the toughness, dangers, and joys of work.

    Conrailblueflaggedsidingatcedarpinespa1970_small Along with many features in the special, relive the creation of the Transcontinental Railroad on this 151st Anniversary of its completion in 1869.  In the whole program you'll witness facts and music about work and workers from the 1800's to today.  You  will hear a variety of genres: soft rock, bluegrass, country, bebop, folk, show tunes, and more.  Artists include Amy Adams, Tom Paxton, Jim Croce, Sawyer Brown, Gordon Lightfoot, Joan Baez, Jim Brickman, Hank Snow, The Silhouettes, John Denver, and many more. plus a classic comedy bit by George Carlin.

    Laborious Music

    From Mississippi Public Broadcasting | Part of the Sounds Jewish series | 59:00

    Tune in to the next Sounds Jewish for a post-Labor Day celebration featuring Jewish labor songs.

    Sj_logo_small Tune in to the next Sounds Jewish for a post-Labor Day celebration featuring Jewish labor songs as well as folk songs about work traditionally done by Jews.

    The Working Tapes of Studs Terkel

    From Radio Diaries | Part of the The Working Tapes series | 54:59

    NEW for 2017: In the early 1970s, author Studs Terkel went around the country with a reel-to-reel tape recorder interviewing people about their jobs. The result was a book called "Working," which quickly became a bestseller. But until now, few of the taped interviews have ever been heard. In this hour, The Working Tapes of Studs Terkel. Featuring interviews with a telephone switchboard operator, a hotel piano player, a Chicago police officer, a private investigator, an auto factory worker and more.

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    In the early 1970’s, author Studs Terkel went around the country with a reel-to-reel tape recorder interviewing people about their jobs. The result was a book called "Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do." The book became a bestseller and even inspired a Broadway musical – something rare for an oral history collection. "Working" struck a nerve, because it elevated the stories of ordinary people and their daily lives. Studs celebrated the un-celebrated.
    But until now, few of the interviews have ever been heard. For decades, the tapes were packed away in Studs’ home office. Radio Diaries and our partner Project& were given exclusive access to those recordings and spent a year combing through them to produce a new series for NPR. We also tracked down some of the people Studs interviewed more than 40 years ago.
    In this hour, our series The Working Tapes of Studs Terkel. Featuring interviews with a telephone switchboard operator, a hotel piano player, a Chicago police officer, an auto factory work, an advertising executive and more. 

    Life Stories - Jobs: Women at Work

    From Jay Allison | Part of the The Life Stories Collection series | 59:07

    Three portraits of women working - A pastor, a seasonal worker, and a judge.

    Lifestories These are public radio stories made over many years, by producer Jay Allison -- working together with Christina Egloff, and friends, colleagues, neighbors, strangers and whoever would take the loan of one of his tape recorders. They are are stories about life as we find it, and record it. HOST: Alex Chadwick In this hour: A Pastor's Journal (27:23) For two months, the pastor of Park Union Church in Chicago kept an audio journal chronicling her daily life and thoughts about the career and the calling of the ministry. Produced with Rev. Susan Johnson and WBEZ Chicago. After Labor Day (2:44) A short meditation on the end of the summer's work and the long winter ahead from writer Carol Wasserman. Produced with Viki Merrick. Retiring the Robe (27:05) On the occasion of her retirement, this Chicago judge borrowed a cassette recorder, and with her family, reflected on her 18 years on the bench. Produced with Judge Susan Snow, Brent Runyon and WBEZ Chicago.

    HV030- Nine to Five

    From Hearing Voices | Part of the Hearing Voices series | 54:00

    The work we do, from Wall Street traders to taxi cab drivers. People who work with brassieres, with dead bodies, and off-the-books in an underground economy. A tone-poem by Ken Nordine, a podcast from Love and Radio, and sound-portraits from Radio Diaries, Toni Schwartz, Ben Rubin, David Greenberger, and hosts Ann Heppermann and Kara Oehler.

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    Host: Ann Heppermann and Kara Oehler of Mapping Main Street

    For Labor Day, the work we do, from Wall Street traders to taxi cab drivers. People who work with brassieres, dead bodies, lost golf balls, and off-the-books in an underground economy:

    The Ramones obviously believe "It's Not My Place (In the 9 to 5 World)" (1980 Pleasant Dreams).

    Meryn Cadell fills out a "Job Application" (1992 Angel Food for Thought).

    In the 1950s Tony Schwartz conversed with The New York Taxi Driver about "A Temporary Job." (This 1959 LP is on The Library of Congress National Recording Registry).

    Steve Fisk recites some "Government Figures" (1980 Over and Thru the Night).

    Grief and guts fill the work day of Aftermath,® Inc: Specialists in Crime Scene and Tragedy Cleanup, Trauma Cleanup, Accidental Death Cleanup. Interview with Tim Reifsteck by Laura Kwerel, produced by Nick van der Kolk; an excerpt from "Aftermath," a Love and Radio podcast. (L & R's slogan: "What Ira Glass might make if he showed up to work drunk.")

    Cilla Black's boyfriend believes "Work is a Four Letter Word" (1968 The Best of Cilla Black).

    Break music: Leroy Anderson "Plink, Plank, Plunk!" (1951 Leroy Anderson Favorites). Part two…

    Retired school teacher Paul Neibuhr dons a full wet suit with air tank and transforms into a professional "Golfball Diver." Produced by Jeff Rice, with music by Leroy Anderson ("Plink, Plank, Plunk!" 1951; theme for the TV game Show I've Got a Secret for 24 years; CD: Leroy Anderson Favorites).

    Ken Nordine wants to be "The Bullfighter" (2001 A Transparent Mask). A Radio Diary from "Selma Koch, Bra Saleswoman." Sez Selma: "Nobody says the retail business was gonna be easy." Produced by Emily Botein and Joe Richman with help from Ben Shapiro and Deborah George (2002 New York Works). LP CoverTony Schwartz talks with The New York Taxi Driver about "Females" as fares. "Open Outcry" is the trading technique heard on the floor of the New York Mercantile Exchange. This sound-portrait by composer Ben Rubin is a 2002 commissioned by Creative Time for Sonic Garden, World Financial Center, NYC. Features the voices of Madeline Boyd, J. Robert Collins, Jr., David Greenberg, John Hanneman, Vincent Viola, Elisa Zuritsky, and others. John, the Medicine Man does the "Chicago Hustles." An excerpt from the documentary on the city's underground economy by our hosts Ann Heppermann and Kara Oehler for the 2005 series Chicago Matters: Money Talks. Reinhardt "Buck" Buchli makes a "Fortunate Decision" (2005). A story told and production by David Greenberger of Duplex Planet. Music performed by Bangalore, composed by Phil Kaplan. The New York Taxi Driver waxes work philosophies with Tony Schwartz in "...The Way It Has to Be." Depeche Mode clocks out with Work Hard (1984 Singles Box 2). And mixed in there is "Toner" by Cornelius (2006 Sensuous). A "collaboration with Takagi Masakatsu produced for Japan's Sound & Recording magazine... inspired by inkjet printers!" Cornelius "Toner":

    Working With Studs

    From Atlantic Public Media | Part of the The Transom Radio Specials series | 54:00

    Studs Terkel, America's greatest listener: A remembrance from those who worked with him.

    200107 For many years, Transom editor, Sydney Lewis, worked side by side with Studs on his radio show and his books. For this remembrance, told in a seamless blend of doumentary and reminiscence, she brings together of crew of Stud's co-workers with their great stories along with wonderful previously-unheard tape of Studs himself. 

    Note: Studs would have been 98 on May 16, 2010.  

    Labor Day Special - "Workin’: The Work Song in Jazz and Popular Music"

    From WFIU | Part of the Night Lights Classic Jazz: Specials series | 59:00

    An hourlong program for the Labor Day holiday, with special guest jazz historian Ted Gioia (author of the book WORK SONGS). Featured artists include Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus, Nat Adderley, Louis Armstrong, and Cassandra Wilson.

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    Work songs gave laborers a way of transforming their toil into something more meaningful, of enriching their everyday lives through music.  How did the influence of the work song emerge in the recordings of artists such as Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus, Nat Adderley, Dave Brubeck and other musicians?  Jazz historian Ted Gioia, author of Work Songs, joins Night Lights for a Labor Day look at the work song's relationship to jazz and popular music.  Other featured artists include Louis Armstrong (his ode to Pullman porters, "Red Cap"), Cassandra Wilson (her cover of Jimmy Webb's "Wichita Lineman") and Sting (with saxophonist Branford Marsalis joining him for the tribute to English coal-miners, "We Work the Black Seam").

    BEAT LATINO 032: Working, Trabajando - A Labor Day Special

    From Catalina Maria Johnson | 58:00

    An hour of melodies and rhythms that are all about working to celebrate Labor Day!

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    Beat Latino celebrates in every hour a different facet of the extraordinary diversity of the Latin & Latino musical universe. This edition of Beat Latino, "A Labor Day Special" is all about work, and celebrating the contribution to this land of hard-working Latinos.

    Whether it´s working all the time, working too hard, not working enough, looking for work, or even taking the occasional day off, there´s a song (and a dance!) to match the mood. Hosted in English and Spanish by Catalina Maria Johnson, so that nearly all who enjoy the music will also have access to the information.

    Broadcasts nicely around Labor Day.


    Half-Hour (24:00-30:00)

    The Port Chicago 50: An Oral History

    From Long Haul Productions | Part of the American Worker Series series | 25:12

    The story of the worst homefront disaster of World War II -- an ammunition explosion that killed more than 300 men -- and what happened to the 50 African-American men who refused to go back to work loading ammunition after the explosion.

    Portchicago_small On July 17, 1944, two Liberty ships anchored at the Port Chicago Munitions Case near San Francisco exploded, killing 320 men and injuring 390. It was the worst homefront disaster of World War II. A majority of the casualties were African-American sailors who loaded ammunition onto the ships at Port Chicago. Shortly after the explosion, the African-American munitions loaders who survived were transferred to a nearby base and ordered back to work. Shaken by the death of their workmates and afraid that another explosion might occur, 50 men refused. In the largest courtmartial in Navy history, they were all convicted of mutiny and sentenced to up to fifteen years of hard labor. In January 1946, only months after the war ended, all convicted men's sentences were suspended as part of a general amnesty. While these men were allowed to return to civilian life, they were left angry, ashamed, and afraid they would be fired from their jobs or worried that they would be seen as unpatriotic. As a result, some did not discuss the case, even with family members, for more than 50 years. Originally broadcast on This American Life in 1996.

    Hog Butchers to the World

    From Long Haul Productions | Part of the American Worker Series series | 28:21

    For labor day, check out the whole series! Studs Terkel reads excerpts from Upton Sinclair's novel "The Jungle" in this history of African Americans in the packinghouse industry of Chicago.

    Workers_together_small The history of African Americans in Chicago's meatpacking industry and the formation of the Packinghouse Workers Union, featuring Studs Terkel reading excerpts from Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle." Production note: Host introduction can be transcribed and edited and read by station announcer.

    Skywalkers of Akwesane

    From Helen Borten | Part of the A Sense of Place: Third Season series | 29:20

    For over a hundred years the Mohawks of Akwesane, a reservation on the New York-Canada border, pursued the occupation of ironworkers, one of the most dangerous jobs in construction.

    Default-piece-image-0 For over a hundred years the Mohawks of Akwesasne, a reservation on the New York-Canada border, pursued the occupation of ironworkers, one of the most dangerous jobs in construction. Mohawks were on the high steel crews of every bridge and skyscraper in Manhattan, commuting between job and their 12-hour-distant home every weekend, and became famous for their skill, daring and major contribution to the skyline of New York. This is the story of men plying a difficult craft in the modern world while cleaving to tribal customs in an ancient world -- a balancing act that has taken its toll in lives and relationships. An honest, intimate and informative portrait of an unusual occupation and the Native Americans who made it their own.

    Nightfall in Chester County

    From Helen Borten | Part of the A Sense of Place series | 29:29

    In Pennsylvania farmland that was the first stop on the Underground Railroad, a strike by Mexican mushroom pickers polarizes a Quaker community.

    Default-piece-image-1 In Pennsylvania farmland that was the first stop on the Underground Railroad, a strike by Mexican mushroom pickers polarizes a Quaker community. From historical chronicles of escaped slaves to the present-day inequalities of immigrants who also followed the North Star,this program traces the journey and ordeals of two groups who arrived at the same place,separated in time but connected by their hopes for a better life. One :30 Promo (click "listen" page, promo labeled "Segment 2")

    Remembering Mother Warren

    From jessica lockhart | 28:41

    A look into the labor history of one of the world's oldest paper mills.

    Millworkers_small Remembering Mother Warren - A look into the labor history of one of the world?s oldest paper mills Remembering Mother Warren unearths the culture of an industrial community, the drama of life working for a once-great employer, and probes the meaning of workers? memories in the face of disruptive industrial change. Produced by Big Talk on WMPG, it is a 30-minute documentary that traces the labor history of the S.D.Warren paper mill in Westbrook, Maine. You?ll hear stories from generations of mill workers and managers, including Shirley Lally, a 30-year veteran who sorted reams of paper by hand, Phil LaViolette, who recalls the struggles of Warren?s Franco workers, and Howard Reiche, a former mill manager who describes the mill?s paternalism and the favoritism encountered by workers prior to unionization. Other workers tell the history of the S.D. Warren ?family,? of their experiences in the mill dating back as far as the 1920s, of the extreme heat, dangerous equipment and deadly accidents, a forgotten1916 strike, unionizing in the 1960s, and of the mill?s recent decline. University of Maine historian Charles Scontras, and University of Southern Maine economist and labor historian Michael Hillard provide analysis of the mill?s unique labor history. ?Remembering Mother Warren? is produced by Big Talk members Jessica Lockhart, Michael Hillard, and Claire Holman. Narrator: Thomas Lestage, President PACE Local 1069. Project Historians: Eileen Eagan and Michael Hillard. Additional narration by Paul Drinan. ?Remembering Mother Warren? won First Place in Public Affairs from the Maine Association of Broadcasters 2003. Sponsored by the Southern Maine Labor Council, AFL-CIO, with funding from the Maine Humanities Council. e-mail us at bigtalk@maine.rr.com


    Cutaways (5:00-8:59)

    People Who Work (Series)

    Produced by Richard Paul

    A series of self-narrated stories of blue-collar workers. We spend time with a garbage man, a bus driver, a parking ticket writer, the owner of a barber shop, an aerobics instructor and the drivers of a van that checks on the health of pregnant women in the inner city. Various pieces between 3 and 9 minutes.

    Most recent piece in this series:

    Barber Shop-Long Version

    From Richard Paul | Part of the People Who Work series | 04:40

    Anacostia_small (NOTE: The name of the shop is pronounced like the second syllable in "Detroit") It seems like you can't pick up the paper today without reading a story decrying the loss of a sense of community in America. Well in Southeast Washington, DC, there's a man who's KEEPING community alive along an aging business strip that -- depending on your attitude -- is either all the way down or well-on-its-way-up. The man is Danny Washington -- the latest proprietor of a neighborhood institution known as Troyit's Barber Shop. This week, in our continuing series on people who work, we spend a Saturday with Danny -- an experienced barber, who, when he took over the shop -- was NOT an experienced businessman. But he's a survivor and he'll keep going because he holds to one, undeniable truth. (THE PIECE BEGINS WITH HIM SAYING: "If you can cut hair, you know that somebody always gonna get a haircut. So all you gotta do is be here. Simple as that.") CLOSE: Danny Washington runs Troyit's Barber Shop at 2018 Martin Luther King Ave, Southeast, Washington, DC. Our series on people who work is produced by Richard Paul.

    WORKING (Series)

    Produced by Homelands Productions

    WORKING is a series of intimate, sound-rich profiles of workers in the global economy. It was broadcast as a special monthly feature on Marketplace Radio between 2007 and 2009. WORKING won the 2008 Sigma Delta Chi Award for Radio Feature Reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists.

    Most recent piece in this series:

    Shipbreaking Worker

    From Homelands Productions | Part of the WORKING series | 07:41

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    Ismael "Babu" Hussein works as an assistant in one of Bangladesh's shipbreaking yards, where armies of laborers dismantle old vessels the way ants devour a carcass. The work is perilous, the bosses abusive, the hours exhausting. Babu's reward? Just over two dollars a day, and nightmares about being crushed by giant sheets of steel. Pretty heavy stuff for a 13-year-old kid.

    Not My Job: Tales From the "Degreasing Room."

    From Chelsea Merz | 08:42

    Matthew Works has been living on the streets for ten years. Here he remembers one of his last paying jobs, assembling Braille typewriters, which thrust him into a Dickensian nightmare.

    Default-piece-image-1 Matthew Works has been living on the streets of Boston for over a decade. Here he remembers one of his last paying jobs, assembling braille typerwriters, which thrust him into a Dickensian nightmare. Producer Chelsea Merz has been chronicalling Matthew's life on the streets for the last few years. This story was taped at a pizza joint in downtown Boston.

    Entrepreneur

    From Jesse Dukes | 06:13

    Adam Johns never wanted to be a worm digger, but he does what's necessary to make ends meet.

    Playing
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    Default-piece-image-0 Adam Johns is a self-styled entrepreneur. These days, that means digging for bloodworms at thirty cents a worm, or anything else to make a quick buck. Adam is frustrated by his circumstances and worried that he might not be able to dig worms anymore. Even so, he still manages to laugh at life.


    Drop-Ins (2:00-4:59)

    On the Night Shift (Series)

    Produced by WFUV

    On this Labor Day, WFUV news catches up with local night shift workers to get their perspective on life after dark, balancing family obligations and the big question -- when do they sleep?

    Most recent piece in this series:

    A Night at the Spa

    From WFUV | Part of the On the Night Shift series | 04:40

    Playing
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    Default-piece-image-0 Intro: While you may be in bed at two in the morning, some people are melting their worries away at a 24-hour spa in mid-town Manhattan. Perhaps not surprisingly, the spa's manager shares some, shall we say -- interesting -- stories about the facility overnight. Tag: This "On the Night Shift" segment was produced by WFUV news.

    Day Job (2007-2008 series) (Series)

    Produced by Joshua McNichols

    Back in 2007-2008 I first explored the "Day Job" concept as a unique way to profile musicians in an online series for the alternative "Seattle Weekly." Several years of public radio experience under my belt now, I rebooted the project in 2014 as a podcast at http://www.northwester.org/dayjob/

    Most recent piece in this series:

    8. Steve Smith drives a bus and a rockabilly band.

    From Joshua McNichols | Part of the Day Job (2007-2008 series) series | 04:29

    Stevesmith3_small I interview Seattle's non-professional musicians about their dayjobs, mixing in music and ambiance from the workplace. The series gets at something universal - how to achieve balance and contentment in life. Steve Smith drives a bus for King County Metro. He also drums in a rockabilly band. Day Job is an ongoing series. New entries will be added to PRX thirty days after episodes debut at Seattleweekly.com.

    Let's Rename it "Labor Exploitation Day"

    From KSFR | Part of the Equal Time with Martha Burk series | 02:30

    Labor Day was created in the 19th century by the unions, to celebrate the economic achievements of American workers. But if we look at the 21st century “economic achievements” by U.S. corporations in taking advantage of their low wage employees, we might as well rename it Labor Exploitation Day.

    Podcastphoto_small Big low-wage employers are now issuing ATM style "payroll cards" instead of paychecks, costing low wage employees hundreds of dollars a year just to acess their money.

    Commentary: Labor's Day -- and Yours

    From Dick Meister | 03:20

    A commentary on how working life would be much harder and far less rewarding were it not for organized labor.

    Default-piece-image-1 There are many reasons to honor unions on Labor Day. Despite their declining membership and arguments among themselvers over organized labor's future direction, they remain extraordinarily important to all working people, union and non-union members alike. Paid holidays such as Labor Day, paid vacations, the eight-hour workday and 40-hour workweek, overtime pay, empl;oyer-financed pensions, medical care and other fringe benefits, health and safety standards, the right to bargain collectively with employers, a truly effective voice in politics -- working people owe all that, and more, to the labor movement.


    Interstitials (Under 2:00)

    Gumbuster

    From WFUV | Part of the Odd Jobs series | 01:27

    In this piece Anthony Mulay explains the technology he uses to rid New York City's sidewalks of gum patches, and where his machine gets the most use.

    Playing
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    Default-piece-image-1 In his own words, Anthony Mulay explains the technology he uses to rid New York City's sidewalks of gum patches, and where his machine gets the most use.

    Labor Day Special - Barbecue

    From BYU radio/KUMT/KBYU-FM | Part of the Constant Wonder series | 54:46

    Celebrate Labor Day with our discussion on the history and culture of barbecue.

    Constant-wonder_small The word "barbecue" is not just used to describe a type of food, it represents a cultural institution. What if barbecue is truly first and foremost, something as big as an event; a cultural phenomenon? What if barbecue has more of a social aspect to it than simply a culinary sort of meaning? Celebrate with us as we delve into history and commentary of "barbecue" and it's social implications.

    Labor Day

    From BYU radio/KUMT/KBYU-FM | Part of the The Apple Seed series | 54:52

    Labor Day is a great opportunity for all of us to reflect on some of the memories we have from working hard, being with family, or learning something new. We think you'll enjoy this collection of stories about work.

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    In 1882, the citizens of New York, if they could get off work on a Monday, could watch the very first Labor Day parade, organized by New York’s labor unions to celebrate the contributions of the American worker, and to lobby for improved working conditions – like an 8-hour work day, for example. Two years later, Labor Day was a national holiday. In this hour of The Apple Seed, you’ll hear stories about Labor Day, and also about labor itself – good, old-fashioned work. You’ll hear about a visit to the State Fair from Kevin Kling, and a poem about taking pride in your work from cowboy poet Joe Herrintgon. You’ll hear one of America’s most famous work stories: the story of John Henry, the steel-drivin’ man, in Charlotte Blake Alston’s “Hammers of Steel Rang Out.” You’ll also hear memories and thoughts about labor and Labor Day gathered from the Apple Seed family: from memories of summer romance to the struggle for better working conditions in Kenya. And we’ll wrap it up with an original work song from Sam and his musical pals about the building of a tunnel through a mile of rock in the 1920s.

    How We Got Here (Series)

    Produced by Sam Harnett

    A series of three hour-long radio documentaries that looks at why American workers are so isolated, precarious, and susceptible to a crisis like the Covid-19 outbreak. Story spans from the 1930s to the present day.

    Most recent piece in this series:

    How We Got Here, Part 3: The Fight For Meaningful Work

    From Sam Harnett | Part of the How We Got Here series | 59:00

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    Pundits and reporters hailed gig companies as a flexible, desirable "future of work" after the recession. With the pandemic, we are seeing how precarious and dangerous these contingent work arrangements are for those who are doing them.

    While the tech industry profits off all the disempowered and isolated workers in our economy, those who have been most oppressed have been fighting for true economic and racial equality.