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Playlist: Juneteenth

Compiled By: PRX Editors

 Credit:
Curated Playlist

Celebrated June 19

New in 2022 - Hour (49:00-1:00:00)

The Sound of 13 (Series)

Produced by KVNO

Host Garrett McQueen opens an historical and contemporary conversation of race in a 13-week classical music series with the 13th amendment as the guide.

Most recent piece in this series:

Sound of 13 22-11

From KVNO | Part of the The Sound of 13 series | 58:02

Playing
Sound of 13 22-11
From
KVNO

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EPISODE 11


James P. Johnson - “Victory Stride” 

Concordia Orchestra, Marin Alsop

Victory Stride: The Symphonic Music of James P. Johnson” 

MusicMasters 2008

4’11’’


Wynton Marsalis - “At the Octoroon Balls” (selections)

Harlem Quartet 

The Harlem Quartet

Central Michigan University 2007

16’30’’


Nora Douglas Holt - “Nora’s Dance”

Lara Downes, piano

Phenomenal Women

Rising Sun 2021

1’46’’


Traditional - “Come Let Us Sing To The Lord”, “Ride on King Jesus”

The Boys Choir of Harlem, Dr. Walter Turnbill

Schubert and Spirituals

TriUnion Entertainment 2000

6’50’’


James P. Johnson - “Harlem Symphony” 

Concordia Orchestra, Marin Alsop

Victory Stride: The Symphonic Music of James P. Johnson” 

MusicMasters 2008

21’40’’


REPLAY Celebrating American Freedom (hour/no bb or bed)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 52:00

In 2019, Virginia joined just three other states in making Juneteenth a paid state holiday, recognizing it as a holiday for all Virginians.

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In 2019, Virginia joined just three other states in making Juneteenth a paid state holiday, recognizing it as a holiday for all Virginians. Lauranett Lee says in this country we have parallel histories, with Black and white Americans knowing about and acknowledging different pasts. But community efforts and local activists are elevating the stories of African Americans so that those parallel histories are brought together. One of those local historians is Wilma Jones, who grew up in the mostly Black community of Halls Hill in Arlington, Virginia. Now the neighborhood is rapidly gentrifying and Black families like hers have been pushed out. Today, Jones says it’s too late to save Grandma’s house, but it’s not too late to save her history.


Later in the show: Much has been said about the golden age of gospel in the 1940s and 50s. But what about the gospel music that came later when hip-hop and soul were dominant? Claudrena Harold’s in her book, When Sunday Comes, takes us to the Black record shops, churches, and businesses that transformed gospel after the Civil Rights era and nurtured the music that was an essential cultural and political expression for African Americans.


Hour (49:00-1:00:00)

The Living on Earth Juneteenth Special

From Living On Earth | Part of the Living on Earth Specials series | 59:00

Free to non-carrying stations: Living on Earth presents a one-hour, eco-justice special honoring Juneteenth, the annual holiday commemorating the ending of slavery in the United States. The special features stories of African foodways, redlining and environmental justice, and black farmers practicing liberation on the land.

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0:30 Promo copy:
CURWOOD: Next time on Living on Earth, an African American woman's journey to reclaim a lost part of her culture, and take up farming.
PENNIMAN: Contrary to popular belief, black and brown folks do want to farm. And this was something that just surprised me, cause I thought I was just a weirdo out here.
CURWOOD: I'm Steve Curwood. Celebrating Juneteenth, next time on Living on Earth from PRX.
***Rundown for “The Living on Earth Juneteenth Special”***
Host: Steve Curwood. 
Billboard: 59  Music Fill: 4:59 (Insert Live Newscast)  Music Fill: 29 
SEGMENT A (14:30)
1.) JUNETEENTH AND THE FOODWAYS OF THE BLACK ATLANTIC: African Americans celebrate their ancestors’ emancipation from slavery on June 19th, a holiday known as Juneteenth. On that day, families gather to picnic and cook out across the South and beyond. The voyage from Africa isn’t often on people’s minds, but it is in their stomachs. Living on Earth’s Ike Sriskandarajah digs into the green foodways of the Black Atlantic. (7:35)
2.) ONE IN FIVE DEATHS FROM FOSSIL FUELS: Fine particulate matter produced from fossil fuel combustion is known to cause numerous health issues, and a study found that this pollution is responsible for one in five early deaths worldwide. Pediatrician Aaron Bernstein, who is the interim director of the Center for Climate, Health and the Global Environment at Harvard, joins Host Steve Curwood to discuss the implications of the research. (6:20)
Segment A ends @ 20:59 with announcer OC:  ...Sailors for the Sea dot org. 
@ 21:00 music bed (0:59) 
SEGMENT B (18:00)
1.) REDLINING LINKED WITH EXTREME URBAN HEAT: In the 1930s, while the world was digging out of the Great Depression, the US government came up with a plan to rate neighborhoods based on their presumed suitability to receive home loans. The neighborhoods that the government, and banks, considered riskiest were outlined in red. These “redlined” neighborhoods tended to be in city centers and home to black Americans. Today as climate change exacerbates urban heat, they’re experiencing much higher temperatures than surrounding areas. Vivek Shandas is a lead author of the research and speaks with Living on Earth’s Bobby Bascomb about the unequal impacts of racist ‘redlining’ practices. (10:40)
2.) WHY I WEAR JORDANS IN THE GREAT OUTDOORS: Stereotypes about who can be “outdoorsy” tend to leave people of color out, so environmental educator CJ Goulding actively and creatively works to encourage young people of color to feel that they belong in the outdoors, too. CJ Goulding speaks with Host Steve Curwood about how his Air Jordan “Bred” 11 sneakers help him link young people of color to the great outdoors. (7:00)
Segment B ends @ 39:59 with announcer OC: .... aerospace, building industries, and food refrigeration. 
@ 40:00 music bed (0:59) 
SEGMENT C (18:00)
1.) FARMING WHILE BLACK: SOUL FIRE FARM’S PRACTICAL GUIDE TO LIBERATION ON THE LAND: Soul Fire Farm in upstate New York is dedicated to not only growing food, but also cultivating environmental, racial and food justice. Its ten black, brown and Jewish farmers aim to dismantle racism within the food system while reconnecting people of color to the earth. Leah Penniman is the co-founder of Soul Fire Farm and joins Host Steve Curwood to discuss her new book, Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm's Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land, and her journey as a person of color reclaiming her space in the agricultural world. (16:35)
Program ends @ 59:00 with network ID. OC: … PRX.
PROMO FOR THIS PROGRAM: 
June 19th marks the holiday known as Juneteenth, when African Americans gather to celebrate their ancestors’ emancipation from slavery with picnics and cook outs. The voyage from Africa isn’t often on people’s minds, but it is in their stomachs, by way of the green foodways of the Black Atlantic. Also, fast-forward to today, to the farmers who are working to cultivate justice and root out racism, by reconnecting people of color to the earth. Celebrating Juneteenth, liberation on the land and more, next time on Living on Earth from PRX.
(Local date and tag line here)
 
FUNDING CREDITS FOR THIS PROGRAM:   
ANNOUNCER: Funding for Living on Earth comes you, our listeners, and from the University of Massachusetts, Boston, in association with its School for the Environment, developing the next generation of environmental leaders. And from the United Technologies Corporation, and the Grantham Foundation for the protection of the environment, supporting strategic communications and collaboration in solving the world’s most pressing environmental problems. 
LIVING ON EARTH MAY BE EXCERPTED ONLY IF STATIONS AIR THE PROGRAM IN ITS ENTIRETY DURING THE WEEK.
For information on carrying Living on Earth, please email memberships@prx.org. You can also visit the PRX station services site at https://www.prx.org/stations.

The Juneteenth Jazz Jamboree

From WFIU | Part of the Night Lights Classic Jazz: Specials series | 59:00

An hour-long program of classic jazz, celebrating an American holiday marking the formal end of slavery.

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"The Juneteenth Jazz Jamboree" is a musical and historical celebration of a significant African-American holiday that marks the formal end of slavery and has evolved into a tradition of food, games, music, and remembrance of ancestors.  The program includes freedom-related jazz from John Coltrane, Louis Jordan, Max Roach with Abbey Lincoln, Paul Robeson with Count Basie, Charles Lloyd, Carmen McRae and more (including musical tributes to African-American icons such as Jackie Robinson and Joe Louis), as well as background and insights from African-American emancipation-celebration historian William Wiggins.


Half Hour (24:00-30:00)

From Juneteenth to Reparations: The Freedom Promise of Unfinished Resolve

From Making Contact | Part of the Making Contact series | 29:00

Juneteenth, also known as Juneteenth Independence Day or Freedom Day, is the oldest known celebration commemorating the end of slavery in the United States.

In this show, we'll explore the history of Juneteenth and we’ll expand our conversation of Juneteenth to include a case for reparations.

The topic of reparations for African Americans has recently resurfaced with Democratic presidential candidates taking positions on the issue, elevating the discussion to the mainstream.

Juneteenth_memorial_monument_-_george_washington_carver_museum_-_austin_texas_small Juneteenth, also known as Juneteenth Independence Day or Freedom Day, is the oldest known celebration commemorating the end of slavery in the United States. In this show, we'll explore the history of Juneteenth and we’ll expand our conversation of Juneteenth to include a case for reparations. The topic of reparations for African Americans has recently resurfaced with Democratic presidential candidates taking positions on the issue, elevating the discussion to the mainstream.