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Playlist: MinneCulture Listen

Compiled By: Micah Whetstone

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Refusenik Love

From Jonathan Hirsch | Part of the ARRVLS series | 16:42

Like many Soviet defectors, Olga left a life behind when she emigrated to the U.S. in the early 80's. This episode of ARRVLS tells the story of love lost and found across time politics, and the world.

Refusenik_love-03_small During the 1970's hundreds of thousands of Russian nationals migrated from their home country. Many left in protest to the policies of the Soviet regime: the antisemitism, the curbing of civil liberties, the jailing of political dissidents. And while it was possible to exit the country, it was for a long time, almost impossible to return. Refugees from this era in Russian history are sometimes referred to as Refuseniks; a nod to their refusal to live under the authoritarian conditions of the time. 

MLK: Three Landmark Speeches

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 59:00

Three key speeches of American civil rights leader and Nobel Peace Laureate Dr. Martin Luther King Junior are excerpted and commented on by two leading King scholars.

King_small Peace Talks Radio producer Paul Ingles interviews two leading King scholars, asking each to pick speeches from those years to focus on.    You’ll hear from the late Dr. Vincent Harding, Professor of Religion and Social Transformation at Illiff School of Theology in Denver, Colorado and a personal friend and speech writing colleague of Dr. King in the 1960’s.  (Dr. Harding died in May of 2014 about 6 months after this interview)  Also mixed into our program, you’ll hear Dr. Clayborne Carson, who at Coretta Scott King’s request, has been directing the King Papers Project since 1985. Dr. Carson established the Martin Luther King, Jr., Research and Education Institute at Stanford University in 2005.  The speeches these scholars chose were… King’s last address, the night before his assassination in Memphis in April, 1968.  Also, the speech he made a year to the day before he was killed, called “Beyond Vietnam,” in which Dr. King came out publicly and explicitly in opposition to the Vietnam War. And from March of 1965, Dr. King’s remarks that he made at the conclusion of the Selma to Montgomery marches, considered a turning point in the struggle for Voting Rights and equality for African Americans.

Link to SELMA TO ALABAMA SPEECH (1965):   http://mlk-kpp01.stanford.edu/index.php/encyclopedia/documentsentry/doc_address_at_the_conclusion_of_selma_march/

Link to BEYOND VIETNAM SPEECH (1967):  http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/mlkatimetobreaksilence.htm

Link to BEEN TO THE MOUNTAINTOP SPEECH (1968):  http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/mlkivebeentothemountaintop.htm

The King of Love: A Short History of the Civil Rights Movement

From Dred-Scott Keyes | 01:30:13

An audio collage of the struggle for civil rights, focusing on the role of Dr. Martin Luther King.

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"The King of Love: A Short History of the Civil Rights Movement" is an audio collage of Martin Luther King Jr. and the events that shaped his life and death.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.- Assassination and Legacy

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | Part of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr- a Rewind series series | 55:00

In this- the sixth and final program in this series about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the assassination and legacy.

Masssey-king-book_small In this- the sixth and final program in this series about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the assassination and legacy. Throughout the series we’ve heard the inspirational and radical words and ideas of Dr. King- today the reaction to his death- and some thoughts about his legacy.

Tribute to Aretha Franklin: "Lady of Mysterious Sorrow"

From Dred-Scott Keyes | Part of the The Cutting Edge series | 57:01

Tribute to Aretha Franklin

Aretha-prx--promo_small The Cutting Edge pays tribute to Aretha Franklin-the Queen of Soul with “Lady of Mysterious Sorrow”. Born on March 25th,  1942, Aretha began her career, singing gospel at the New Bethel Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan, where her father, C. L. Franklin, was minister. In 1960, at the age of 18, she embarked on a secular career, by recording with Columbia Records but achieving only modest success. After signing to Atlantic Records in 1966, Aretha achieved commercial acclaim and success with songs such as "Respect", "Chain of Fools", "Think", "A Natural Woman", "Don't Play That Song", and "Spanish Harlem". She recorded 112 charted singles on Billboard, including 77 Hot 100 entries, 17 top-ten pop singles, 100 R&B entries and 20 number-one R&B singles, becoming the most charted female artist in the chart's history. Aretha also won 18 Grammy Awards, including the first eight awards given for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance from 1968 through 1975. She’s one of the best-selling musical artists of all time, having sold more than 75 million records worldwide.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.- A Portrait of Atlanta 1962

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | Part of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr- a Rewind series series | 54:59

Today on the second of six programs honouring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., a portrait from 1962 of the city of Atlanta. It was the birthplace Dr. King and became one of the first southern cities to become de-segregated.

Masssey-king-book_small Today on the second of six programs honouring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., a portrait from 1962 of the city of Atlanta. It was the birthplace of Dr. King and became one of the first southern cities to become de-segregated. Listen to this fascinating period piece of a city caught up in the sweep of history.