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Playlist: Poetry Month

Compiled By: PRX Editors

 Credit: Shutterstock.
Image by: Shutterstock.  
Curated Playlist

Plan ahead for April. Check out these great documentaries, youth slam poetry and new specials.

Below are picks chosen by PRX editorial staff. You can see all poetry radio on PRX by using our search.

New in 2014

When Words Matter: A National Poetry Month Special

From Al Letson | Part of the State of the Re:Union: Season Four series | 53:53

In this National Poetry Month special, SOTRU explores all facets of poetry and its influence in host Al Letson's life. We talk to poets from all over the country about the craft, the lifestyle, the resurgence of poems, and of course, hear some incredible poetry.

Poetry-month-logo_01_small State of the Re:Union
When Words Matter: A National Poetry Month Special

Host: Al Letson
Producer: Al Letson

Episode Description: In this National Poetry Month special, SOTRU explores all facets of poetry and its influence in host Al Letson's life. We talk to poets from all over the country about the craft, the lifestyle, the resurgence of poems, and of course, hear some incredible poetry.

BILLBOARD (:59)
Incue: From PRX and WJCT
Outcue: But first, this news.

News Hole 1:00-6:00

SEGMENT A (12:29)
Incue: From WJCT in Jacksonville, Florida...
Outcue: on State of the Re:Union's poetry special.

Poetry Can Change the World
Al kicks off the episode with a personal story, about being at a large poetry gathering in a small Southern town, Americus, Georgia.  Americus wasn't exactly ready for a big group of diverse poets.  In between the friction between Letson and a sheriff, both of them learn the power of words.

Stand Up and Stand Strong
We hear a poem by slam poet and Kevin  Burke. In "Day Two," Kevin reflects on his time working as a substitute teacher and wanting the kids to stand up for something important.

SEGMENT B (18:59)
Incue: I'm Al Letson and you are listening to
Outcue: P-R-X-dot-O-R-G.

A Southern Griot and His Craft
Performance poet and author Ayodele Heath performs "Things My Father Gave Me (Which I Never Asked For)," a poem about all the things an African-American father passes down to his son. Then, Al interviews Ayodele about the craft of writing and how he got into poetry.

Two Short Poems from Derrick Brown
Two short poems, "Debbie" and "Eating the Whole," from poet and publisher Derrick Brown, a traveling poet as well as the publisher of Write Bloody Publishing.

The Year of No Mistakes
Writer, performer and historian Cristin O'Keefe Aptowicz's new book "The Year of No Mistakes" chronicles the aftermath of the breakup of her long-term relationship. In this piece Cristin talks about her roots, falling in love with slam poetry and her new home New York City, she meets a fellow poet and begins a fourteen year romance.  Years later an amazing opportunity opens up for her to follow her dream to be a professional writer. But as we learn, those opportunities come at a cost.

SEGMENT C (18:59)
Incue: I'm Al Letson and you are listening to
Outcue: ...to bring them back together.

Self Centered
Asian American spoken word poet Kelly Zen-Yie Tsai reflects on what life would be like if she ruled the world.

Youth Speaks - The Next Generation Speaks for Itself
Youth Speaks is an organization that helps teens find their voices. The group engages them in writing poetry, then empowers them to become leaders and activists in their own communities. Through this piece, Founder and Executive Director James Kass, tells us how Youth Speaks got started, the poets they've worked with, and the reach of the organization. We'll also hear some teens performing their poetry.

Close and Montage
Al wraps up the episode with a personal story about what poetry means to him. Then, we finish things up with excerpts of poems from poets from across the country.

When Words Matter is available on PRX without charge to all public radio stations, and may be aired an unlimited number of times prior to January 31, 2017. The program may be streamed live on station websites but not archived. Excerpting is permitted for promotional purposes only. 

State of the Re:Union is presented by WJCT and distributed by PRX.  Major funding for the State of the Re:Union comes from CPB, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the Delores Barr Weaver Fund at The Community Foundation for Northeast Florida.

Thanks for your consideration of State of the Re:Union with Al Letson. 

 

The Gift (Series)

Produced by Stanzi Vaubel

WBEZ presents this new poetry series – produced by Stanzi Vaubel and curated by Rachel Jamison Webster, author of September: Poems. This project is a collaboration with UniVerse of Poetry, a station partner and 501(c)3 organization that aims to celebrate poets from every nation in the world. Each piece drops us into a poets’ inner life, reminding us of the gift of being human among others.

Most recent piece in this series:

Chicago Public Radio's The Gift Part I : Linda Hogan

From Stanzi Vaubel | Part of the The Gift series | 05:38

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WBEZ presents  The Gift  – produced by Stanzi Vaubel and curated by Rachel Jamison Webster, author of  September: Poems. This project is a collaboration with UniVerse of Poetry , a station partner that aims to celebrate poets from every nation in the world.  Each piece drops us into a poets’ inner life, reminding us of the gift of being human among others.

Linda Hogan is Writer in Residence for the Chickasaw Nation and author of several award-winning works of fiction, poetry and non-fiction, including the memoir, The Woman Who Watches Over the World .  Here she reads from her book of poetry, The Book of Medicines .

Louder Than a Bomb 2013 (Series)

Produced by WBEZ

Just in time for National Poetry Month, Chicago Public Media (WBEZ-Chicago) presents the latest series of studio recordings featuring finalists from the 2013 Louder Than a Bomb Teen Poetry Festival and Competition, including the heart-wrenching "Found Letters to My Granddaughter" and the viral successes "Thick" and "Ray" - all under 3 minutes!

Most recent piece in this series:

Louder Than A Bomb 2013 Radio Special

From WBEZ | Part of the Louder Than a Bomb 2013 series | 59:03

Timeout_credit-jeff_kroll_photo-kevin_aprilspecialtp_small Over the past 13 years, Louder than a Bomb, Chicago’s youth poetry competition, has grown from humble roots in the basement of a Division Street theater to selling out the Cadillac Palace Theater. In this hour, we explore the lasting effects of the program on the students and teachers who are a part of it. Even more poignant now that 8 other US cities have launched Louder Than a Bomb in their community. How has this spoken word program changed their trajectories?

Pretty LIT 2.1

From BJ Love | Part of the Pretty LIT series | 21:37

Featuring some totally pretty literature by Mike Young, Montreux Rotholtz, Ted Berrigan, Jeff Hipsher, Josephine Rowe, Eric Baus, and Elizabeth Bishop.

Music: Big & Rich, Nine Inch Nails, Aphex Twin, De La Soul ft. Teenage Fanclub, Prince, Kanye West, The Smiths, Run DMC, Alicia Keys, and James Brown.

Playing
Pretty LIT 2.1
From
BJ Love

Img_4569_small Featuring some totally pretty literature by Mike Young, Montreux Rotholtz, Ted Berrigan, Jeff Hipsher, Josephine Rowe, Eric Baus, and Elizabeth Bishop. Music: Big & Rich, Nine Inch Nails, Aphex Twin, De La Soul ft. Teenage Fanclub, Prince, Kanye West, The Smiths, Run DMC, Alicia Keys, and James Brown.

Maxine Kumin: Past American Voice

From New Letters on the Air | 29:00

We begin the celebration of Women's History Month with a tribute to Maxine Kumin, who died on February 6, 2014 at the age of 88. A former Consultant in Poetry to Library of Congress (now known as the US Poet Laureate), Kumin is best known for her straightforward and unflinching poetic verse that covered a range topics from skinny-dipping with William Wordsworth to her own recovery from a near fatal accident. Compiled from 1980, 1987, and 2002 interviews, with readings from UP COUNTRY to her 21st century book, THE LONG MARRIAGE, reflecting experiences from her then 55 year marriage.

Kuminpav-400_small We begin the celebration of Women's History Month with a tribute to Maxine Kumin, who died on February 6, 2014 at the age of 88. A former Consultant in Poetry to Library of Congress (now known as the US Poet Laureate), Kumin is heralded for her poetry and her dedication to feminism. Associated with her contemporaries Adrienne Rich, Sylvia Plath, and close friend, Anne Sexton, Kumin worked as an essayist, children's author, and fiction writer, but is best known for her straightforward and unflinching poetic verse that covered a range topics from skinny-dipping with William Wordsworth to her own recovery from a near fatal accident. Compiled from 1980, 1987, and 2002 interviews, with readings from UP COUNTRY to her 21st century book, THE LONG MARRIAGE, reflecting experiences from her then 55 year marriage. 

Minneapolis Freestyle (Series)

Produced by KBEM

Minneapolis High School Students, with the help of a team of educators and poets, were encouraged to write poetry. The poems created by the students are in some cases hard-hitting, and in others, cute.

Most recent piece in this series:

Re-entry of the Father

From KBEM | Part of the Minneapolis Freestyle series | 02:12

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High School students express many types of experiences and emotions in poetry. Frequently they write on subjects they have scarce opportunities to address. Students were recorded by a representative of KBEM-FM (Minneapolis, 88.5, www.jazz88fm.com).

 


Hour (49:00-1:00:00)

LiveHopeLove

From Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting | 53:00

Writer and poet Kwame Dawes explores HIV/AIDS in Jamaica. Produced by Outer Voices and the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.

Aids_small HIV/AIDS is defined by people: their complex lives, their bravery, their fear, their sadness, their need, their laughter, their inconsistencies--basically, their rich humanity. LiveHopeLove looks at the universal problems faced by people with HIV/AIDS, through the specific lens of Jamaica, where almost no one is unaffected by the disease. What are the unique realities of this small island state that set its HIV/AIDS sufferers apart from those in the rest of the world? Poet and writer Kwame Dawes travels to Jamaica to explore the experience of people living with HIV/AIDS and to examine how the disease has shaped their lives. Dawes' poems, inspired by their stories, take this documentary into deep realms of the heart.

LiveHopeLove: HIV/AIDS in Jamaica is the second of two multimedia reporting initiatives undertaken by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting with support from the MAC AIDS Fund.

Visit LiveHopeLove.com to explore the interactive website with rich photography, the complete set of Kwame's poems, short video documentaries and musical interpretations of the poems.

The radio documentary is produced by Stephanie Guyer-Stevens and Jack Chance of Outer Voices, in association with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.

HV Special: Wordshakers (Poetry)

From Hearing Voices | Part of the Hearing Voices series | 53:57

Poetry Grits Glory Verve

Poet150_small WORDSHAKERS, a Free (((Hearing Voices))) Hour POETRY Special SUGGESTED AIRDATES: April, National Poetry Month HOST: Andrei Codrescu (NPR & The Exquisite Corpse) Lord Alfred Tennyson bangs the podium in "The Charge of the Light Brigade." Thomas Edison waxes Walt Whitman's "America." Cheerleaders Chant" a found-poem. Host Andrei Codrescu decontructs his "Poetry." Denise Levertov knows "The Secret." Carl Sandburg wonders "What is Poetry?" (produced by Barrett Golding). Scott Carrier presents the categorical conundrum of "Alex Caldiero- Poet?" And Ed Sanders poses "A Question of Fame." Host Codrescu gives a play-by-play of "Poetic Terrorism." DJ Spooky remixes Vladimir Maiakovski. Pre-teen poet Sawyer Shetfs lists "The Sound I Hear at Night." In New Orleans a hot-dog vendor, a barkeep, and a stripper get churned in the "Poetry Combine (produced by Larry Massett). "Soldiers Drill" their found-poem. Jan Kerouac responds to her father's poetry and parenting in "Jan on Jack" (produced by Marjorie Van Halteren). Allen Ginsberg runs a "Personals Ad." Marianne Faithful performs Gregory Corso's "Getting to the Poem." Another poem is found in "Double Dutch Rhymes." Alex Caldiero concludes "Poetry is Wanted Here." And a Phoebe Snow fan helps sing "Poetry Man." CONTACT: Creative PR http://creativepr.org/ Kathy Gronau 888.233.5650 COST: FRE- 0 PRX points. RIGHTS: Unlimited use in 2006.

The Children of Children Keep Coming

From WNPR | 51:01

Through story and song, author Russell Goings has adapted his epic poem “The Children of Children Keep Coming” into an hour-long spoken word performance that delineates and celebrates the too often unsung African American cultural history.

Goings_small Through story and song, author Russell Goings has adapted his epic poem “The Children of Children Keep Coming” into an hour-long spoken word performance that delineates and celebrates the too often unsung African American cultural history.  His inspiration comes from friendship of iconic collagist Romare Bearden and from the voices of the ancestors.

Infused with the improvisational feel of jazz, this program celebrates the soulful spirits of ancestors through Goings’ masterfully poetic prose.  Narratives of historical figures Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King Jr., Frederick Douglass and Phillis Wheatley intertwine with mythic characters Evalina, Banjo Pete and Black Tiny Shiny to tell the important story of the African American heroic journey.  

With introduction by acclaimed Tony Award winning Broadway actor Brian Stokes Mitchell, the radio adaptation of “The Children” will be available for broadcast on public radio stations nationwide starting Black History Month, February 2010.  It is the first part of a yearlong audio and lecture series exploring African-American narratives through art and storytelling, in partnership with WNPR – Connecticut Public Radio and Fairfield University.


Russell Goings graduated with honors from Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1959.  He briefly played professional football, and then headed to Wall Street to become the first African-American brokerage manager for a New York Stock Exchange member firm.  Later, he became the first black owner of an investment firm, which managed the assets of some of the world’s largest companies along with many legendary athletes and entertainers.  He was founder of Essence Magazine and became the chairman of the Studio Museum in Harlem.  Goings is an inductee into the Wall Street Hall of Fame.  He spent thirteen years writing the “Children”, studying under Pulitzer Prize nominee and Fairfield University poetry professor Kim Bridgford. 

DHARMA BEATS: an Interview with poets Marc Olmsted and Peter Marti

From Julie Adler | 55:02

Interview with Beat poets Marc Olmsted and Peter Marti on their work, their Buddhist leanings and their love for mentor Allen Ginsberg.

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During a Thanksgiving retreat up in northern California at a Tibetan Buddhist center, Pema Osel Ling, producer Julie Adler snuck away from the dinner dance party with Peter and fellow dharma comrade, Marc Olmsted to engage them in a conversation about their dual practices of Buddhism and poetry.   Long time friends, the two of them met in the 70s working in the library at San Francisco State University. The famed Allen Ginsberg once said of Marc, "He inherited Burroughs' scientific nerve & Kerouac's movie-minded line nailed down with gold eyebeam in San Francisco."  And Gregory Corso once said of Peter’s work, “Yeah, you made me see it.”   Both Peter and Marc talk about the process of writing, about being Buddhists and about their main inspiration, Allen Ginsberg. 

 

 

Renaissance Poetry: Madrigals, Chansons, and Villancicos

From WFIU | Part of the Harmonia Early Music: Specials series | 58:58

An hour-long program of early music, exploring the poetic forms behind the most popular Renaissance vocal music from Italy, France, and Spain. Great special for Poetry Month!

380px-verdelot1_small Harmonia looks at the poetry behind the most popular Renaissance vocal music from Italy, France, and Spain. Plus, Nigel North performs in a featured release of lute music by Robert Johnson.  

Confronting the Warpland: Black Poets of Chicago

From Ed Herrmann | 58:46

Hear some of the great African American poets who have lived and worked in Chicago.

Gwendolyn_brooks_small

"Confronting the Warpland:  Black Poets of Chicago" features the words and voices of some of the great African American poets from Chicago. 

Beginning with with Great Migration of the early 20th Century, and continuing to contemporary poets, the program features interviews and readings by writers who who have made a unique and crucial contribution to African American literature, including Gwendolyn Brooks, Haki Madhubuti, Sterling Plumpp, Margaret Walker, Quraysh Ali Lansana, and Tyehimba Jess. These writers have vastly different styles and concerns, but all use poetry to examine life in a racially divisive society.

"Confronting the Warpland:  Black Poets of Chicago" is a production of the Poetry Foundation. It was written and produced by Ed Herrmann and is narrated by Richard Steele. It was first broadcast on WBEZ Chicago Public Radio in February 2008.

Poets of the Moment - Elliott Colla & Jaimy Gordon

From Open Source | 58:59

Elliott Colla talks about the poetry of revolution and its role for transformation in Egypt. Then, we're with Jaimy Gordon, whose novel The Lord of Misrule won the National Book Award this winter.

Ecolla__1__small Elliott Colla is tuning in on the poetry of revolution in Egypt. His memo for the next explosion: take the pulse of the poets and pop musicians to feel this moment, and read the novels for after-analysis. 

Jaimy Gordon won the National Book Award for her gorgeous racetrack novel, Lord of Misrule, in a classic dark horse moment.  

Walt Whitman: Song of Myself

From WNYC | 58:58

In this program we peel back Walt Whitman's "Leaves of Grass" and we discover that this groundbreaking work was the product of a man so far ahead of his time that we are just now able to fully appreciate his work.

Whitmanimageversions One hundred and fifty years have passed since Walt Whitman first published Leaves of Grass, a collection of twelve poems that irrevocably altered the development of poetry and literature. His magnum opus shattered existing notions of poetry, breaking all existing conventions in terms of subject matter, language, and style. Leaves of Grass opened the door not only for poets, but writers, artists, musicians, and thinkers to break down barriers in their own work; despite never reaching a mass audience during the artist's lifetime, its tremendous impact is being felt a century and a half later. Today, we are still trying to understand who Whitman was, what he was saying, and what he was styling himself to be. Hosted by Carl Hancock Rux, "Walt Whitman: Song of Myself" explores how a 36-year old freelance journalist and part-time house-builder living in Brooklyn created his outrageous, groundbreaking work. We join Whitman on a walk through the urban streets, imagining the sights, sounds and music, from Stephen Foster to Italian opera, that profoundly affected him and indelibly shaped his poetry. The city transformed Whitman, and Whitman in turn transformed the wild diversity and intensity of the city into a radical, passionate vision for America. In his poetry, he refused to be censored: he celebrated the body and sexuality; he embraced the invisible and the disenfranchised, from women to slaves to prostitutes. His hopes to heal the country of its deep political divisions through his poetry were dashed by the Civil War, but his work lives on as a vital life-affirming force. In this hour-long special, Rux speaks with writers, poets, musicians, and scholars who tell the story of this extraordinary, self-styled celebrity. Guests include writers Michael Cunningham and Phillip Lopate; poets Martin Espada, hailed by some as a contemporary Whitman, and Ishle Yi Park, Queens poet laureate; composers John Adams and Ned Rorem; choreographer Bill T. Jones; Whitman scholars Karen Karbiener and David Reynolds; and many, many others. Actors including Jeffrey Wright and Paul Giammatti share readings of Whitman's poetry, which, one hundred and fifty years on, still astonishes.

Poems and Pen Pals for Peace: Peace Talks Radio (59:00 / 54:00)

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 58:54

This time on Peace Talks Radio, two women who are finding inspiration for peacemaking in the written word - through poetry and an international pen pal program for youth.

Students_writing_letters_in_school_in_ghana_small This time on Peace Talks Radio, two women who are finding inspiration for peacemaking in the written word. Kim Rosen, author of the book Saved by a Poem, talks about how people struggling with personal conflict can find peace, comfort and perspective in the words of poetry and song. She also sees a role for poetry in international negotiations that address conflict on a broader scale. Also on the program, Sarah Wilkinson tells about the Peace Pal Project which connects school children in different parts of the world through a pen pal initiative and conflict resolution curriculum that,she says, broadens understanding and gives young people tools to address the conflicts that may lay ahead in their lives. Carol Boss is the host.

Shakespeare in the Alley: Bob Dylan's Poetics (Series)

Produced by Bill King

Twelve shows, 59 minutes each, discussing Dylan's lyrics as poetry. Each show is about one-half music, one-half commentary.

Most recent piece in this series:

Show 2: Dylan and the Three Kings

From Bill King | Part of the Shakespeare in the Alley: Bob Dylan's Poetics series | 59:35

Prx1-07_small Show 2 continues to develolp the idea of "radical solitude," focusing on "Just Like a Woman" and then turning to the question of interpretation, including a radio drama based on "The Three Kings," the liner notes to the "John Wesley Harding" album.

There is a substantial companion web site at http://www.dylanalley.org

BEAT LATINO 007: Poems and all that Song and Dance

From Catalina Maria Johnson | 59:00

From 16 century mystics to Pablo Neruda and Federico Garcia Lorca - a wonderfully danceable sampler of Latin American and Spanish poems

Beatlatino-poetry-110403_small Beat Latino, hosted by Catalina Maria Johnson, celebrates in every hour a different facet of the extraordinary diversity of the latin/latino musical universe. This hour's selection highlights the work of Latin American and Spanish poets that has been set to song. Never has poetry been quite this danceable! The selections span the range from the poems of the 16th century Spanish mystic St. John of the Cross, to afrocuban versions of pieces written by Miguel Hernandez, who died imprisoned during the Spanish Civil war, to a rock in Spanish version of Gil Scott Heron's "The Revolution will not be televised". Broadcasts well for Poetry Month, April, and just about anytime!

Life Distilled: Four Decades of U.S. Poet Laureates (Series)

Produced by New Letters on the Air

This five-episode series of one-hour programs features 17 of the men and women who have served as United States Poet Laureates over the past four decades. Each episode can stand alone.

Most recent piece in this series:

Episode 5 - Life Distilled: Four Decades of U.S. Poet Laureates

From New Letters on the Air | Part of the Life Distilled: Four Decades of U.S. Poet Laureates series | 01:04:05

Logosquareblue_small Episode 5 features three former poet laureates from the 1980s: Anthony Hecht, Maxine Kumin, and Reed Whittemore, as well as the man who takes over as poet laureate in fall 2006, Donald Hall. SEGMENT A: Anthony Hecht (1923-2004), a New York City native, won the Pulitzer Prize in 1968 for his poetry collection THE HARD HOURS. In this segment, recorded at a 1987 Poet Laureate celebration in D.C., he talks with Robert Aubry Davis about his acquaintance with poet W.H. Auden, the significance of literary prizes on a poet's career, and the differences between performance poetry and poetry on the page. He also reads his amusing poem "Antipodosis." Hecht served as U.S. Poet Laureate from 1982-84. SEGMENT B: Reed Whittemore served twice as Consultant in Poetry--once from 1965-66, and again to replace the ailing Robert Fitzgerald in 1984-85. Following his last tenure, Whittemore became the Poet Laureate of his home state of Maryland. In this segment, also recorded at the 1987 Celebration of the Poet Laureate, Whittemore talks with Robert Aubry Davis about the influence of poetry during a time of war, and ponders poetry's political significance in a post-Beat society. SEGMENT C: Maxine Kumin, Poetry Consultant to the Library of Congress from 1981-83, lives in New Hampshire with her husband, and her poetry often references nature, family, and her love of horses. In the first part, Kumin reads poems from her 1973 Pulitzer Prize-winning book UP COUNTRY: POEMS OF NEW ENGLAND and talks with David Ray about her use of form and content. The second excerpt is from an interview by poet Michelle Boisseau, in which Kumin talks frankly about the 1998 horse-riding accident that nearly killed her and reads from her 2001 book THE LONG MARRIAGE. This segment finishes with newly appointed poet laureate Donald Hall reads "Ox Cart Man," included in his book WHITE APPLES AND THE TASTE OF STONE: POEMS 1946-2006. Twice the Poet Laureate of New Hampshire, Hall hopes to bring more poetry to public radio. Husband of the late poet Jane Kenyon, he lives on his ancestral farm near Danbury, New Hampshire.

What's the Word? Rhyme

From Modern Language Association | Part of the What's the Word? Celebrating Poetry series | 29:45

Rhyme in Arabic, English, and French poetry.

Vendlerii_small What's the Word? Rhyme As children, we learn to rhyme before we know what it is. We hear it in nursery rhymes, games, and songs. Our first attempts at writing poetry usually involve rhyme. On this program, we'll hear about rhyme in three languages. The poetry critic Helen Vendler explores William Butler Yeats's "Sailing to Byzantium"; Suzanne Stetkevych talks about classical Arabic ode; and Laurence Porter discusses French poetry. Well-suited to National Poetry Month in April. If you are interested in this, see our piece at What's the Word? Contemporary Language Poetry . Fifteen- and thirty-second promos available. Photo credit: Mary Lee


Half-Hour+ (30:01-48:59)

Maya Angelou & Guy Johnson - Mother and Son Poets become themselves

From Sedge Thomson | 44:47

Mother and son poets meet to talk about the courage of poetry, the pleasures of red rice and language.

Angelou3-sized_small The mother is a poet, the son is a poet. She raised him in San Francisco, New York, later, in Egypt, Africa, Paris. She earned her way cooking creole food in a San Francisco restaurant. She found her way raising her son to learn courage, poetry, and manners. She learned how to prepare "my black boy to be raised in a white society." The mother is the renowned poet and memoirist, Dr. Maya Angelou. The son is Guy Johnson, poet and novelist. She travels to the Bay Area from time to time to visit her son and grandchildren. In this program, we hear Guy talk about his writing, his motivation, the energy of his poetry, and the deep emotion of being a parent. Then, his mother comes on stage and she talks about the conditions of raising him as a mother of 17, her own relationships with her mother and her mother's slave antecedents. You can't learn poetry unless you have courage; you must love yourself to find your way, to be somebody; her son Guy made her who she is. It's a joyful, funny, moving and inspiring story of parental and filial love, a memoir of America in a certain time; the influence of a mother on a child; and the importance of knowing how to cook red rice.


Half-Hour (24:00-30:00)

Raymond Carver Reads What We Talk About When We Talk About Love

From Leet and Litwin | Part of the Tell Me A Story series | 29:43

The 2015 Best Picture has drawn from Raymond Carver's WHAT WE TALK ABOUT WHEN WE TALK ABOUT LOVE, his most famous story; he reads it in his own voice.

Carver_2_small The New York Times Book Review says that Raymond Carver is "surely the most influential writer of American short stories in the second half of the 20th century." Surely Raymond Carver's signature story is WHAT WE TALK ABOUT WHEN WE TALK ABOUT LOVE. This program presents the story, told in his voice: his own interpretation of his work. In 1983, we meet him at dawn, in a motel in Palo Alto. After a short conversation, philosophical and sometimes funny, the story begins.

A BACKGROUND: 

Originally, the story had a different title: BEGINNERS. The original tale had been different, too: longer, more complex, more nuanced, with more significant characters. At the time Carver's editor was Gordon Lish, who whittled the story, adding violent actions and offensive language. And Lish renamed the story from BEGINNERS to WHAT WE TALK ABOUT WHEN WE TALK ABOUT LOVE.
  

When in 1983, we recorded Carver in Palo Alto, he was working on a Broadway play; this would be entitled to be BEGINNERS. Decades later, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarrita made the story-inspired, play-inspired into a movie called BIRDMAN; he hired four writers; the director also wrote. The result: the highest award for the 2015 Oscars.

This background is not included in this program, but stations may find useful some extra information to present the show.

ALSO! We suggest to CHOP OFF AT 29:00! The last 43 seconds are NOT RELEVANT now.




 

Affrilachian Poets

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 28:57

Appalachia is often imagined as rural and white, but a new wave of African-American writers is challenging the notion of a single Appalachian region and culture.

Affrilachia_small Appalachia is often imagined as rural and white, but a new wave of African-American writers is challenging the notion of a single Appalachian region and culture. They call themselves Affrilachians. With Good Reason speaks with Frank X Walker, the poet who invented the word Affrilachia. The show also features readings from poets Hope Johnson and Crystal Good.

The Mikie Show #70, Tan Lin

From Michael Carroll | Part of the The Mikie Show series | 28:02

Join us for a fascinating conversation with poet, Tan Lin. He expands poetry’s palette to include data, video, films, hashtags; our newest observable world. He’s also a recipient of a Getty Distinguished Scholar grant, an author, teaches creative writing at New Jersey City University and his videos have been displayed in the Whitney Museum, Yale Art Museum and Boesky Gallery to name a few. Plus Mikie gets held up by fog! Not as impressive but still, fog! And there’s another guest, a quiz and news that you won’t hear anywhere else, for good reason! So why not click the little play arrow and enter that oh so foggy realm of The Mikie Show!

Canterbury_tales_small

Join us for a fascinating conversation with poet, Tan Lin. He expands poetry’s palette to include data, video, films, hashtags; our newest observable world. He’s also a recipient of a Getty Distinguished Scholar grant, an author, teaches creative writing at New Jersey City University and his videos have been displayed in the Whitney Museum, Yale Art Museum and Boesky Gallery to name a few. Plus Mikie gets held up by fog! Not as impressive but still, fog! And there’s another guest, a quiz and news that you won’t hear anywhere else, for good reason! So why not click the little play arrow and enter that oh so foggy realm of The Mikie Show!

Art is Our Weapon: A Conversation With Climbing Poetree

From Making Contact | Part of the Making Contact series | 29:00

Alixa and Naima are two poets who together make up Climbing PoeTree, an award winning performance duo. Mixing poetry and politics they seek to use their words to educate and inspire. On this edition, we hear performances by Climbing PoeTree and find out where such inspiring artists find their own inspiration.

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Alixa and Naima are two poets who together make up Climbing PoeTree, an award winning performance duo.  Mixing poetry and politics they seek to use their words to educate and inspire.  On this edition, we hear performances by Climbing PoeTree and find out where such inspiring artists find their own inspiration.

What's the Word? Celebrating National Poetry Month in April (Series)

Produced by Modern Language Association

Two shows exploring the power of poetry — from our earliest childhood rhyming games to expressions that attempt to capture in words the spiritual connection with the divine.

Most recent piece in this series:

What's the Word? Mystical Poets

From Modern Language Association | Part of the What's the Word? Celebrating National Poetry Month in April series | 29:00

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In often surprising language, the mystical poets Rumi, Teresa of Ávila, and Richard Crashaw expressed their devotion by drawing parallels between love of God and romantic love.

 

Fifteen- and thirty-second promos available.

RN Documentary: Seamus Heaney: Bogging In Again

From Radio Netherlands Worldwide | Part of the RN Documentaries series | 29:30

Northern Irish poet and Nobel laureate Seamus Heaney revisits dark past in response to recent wars and violence.

Showimage_small Northern Irish poet Seamus Heaney won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1995. Since then his lines have been quoted by world leaders, his new translation of "Beowulf" has become a best-seller, and he has praised rapper Eminem for encouraging interest in poetry among young people. But in his latest collection, District & Circle, Heaney returns to some of the darkest images of his work in the 1970s...when the violence in Northern Ireland was still his main preoccupation. Perro de Jong talked to the poet at the 2006 Poetry International Festival in Rotterdam. About the perils of discarding history too soon...and the need to go back to the "first life" of memory and place when the world makes you feel "simply lost?

Poems and Pen Pals for Peace: Peace Talks Radio (29:00)

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Half Hour Episodes series | 29:01

This time on Peace Talks Radio, two women who are finding inspiration for peacemaking in the written word - through poetry and an international pen pal program for youth.

Maxime_with_students_in_dakar_small This time on Peace Talks Radio, two women who are finding inspiration for peacemaking in the written word. Kim Rosen, author of the book Saved by a Poem, talks about how people struggling with personal conflict can find peace, comfort and perspective in the words of poetry and song. She also sees a role for poetry in international negotiations that address conflict on a broader scale. Also on the program, Sarah Wilkinson tells about the Peace Pal Project which connects school children in different parts of the world through a pen pal initiative and conflict resolution curriculum that,she says, broadens understanding and gives young people tools to address the conflicts that may lay ahead in their lives. Carol Boss is the host.

There is also a 59:00/54:00 version of this program at PRX: http://www.prx.org/pieces/43104-poems-and-pen-pals-for-peace-peace-talks-radio-5

Whitman at War

From With Good Reason | 28:56

On a trip to see his brother, Walt Whitman was so struck by the violence of the Civil War that he stayed to help heal wounded soldiers. He hoped his poetry could heal the war-torn nation in a similar way.

Whitman_small In 1862, poet Walt Whitman went to Fredericksburg, Virginia, searching for his brother George who had been wounded in a Civil War battle. Whitman was so moved by the carnage he found that he worked as a nurse for the rest of the war.   Mara Scanlon and Brady Earnhardt say Whitman was helping heal wounded soldiers in the same way he hoped his poetry could heal the war-torn nation. Also featured: This is the 200th anniversary of the birth of 19th-century poet and author Edgar Allan Poe.  Jerome McGann says Poe, whose influence is probably unmatched by any American author, was more charming and humorous than his famous dark fiction suggests.

RN Documentary: Verbal Fireworks

From Radio Netherlands Worldwide | Part of the RN Documentaries series | 27:30

A profile of Alix Olson - award winning spoken word performance artist/activist considered by some “one of the ten most dangerous women in America.”

10881733_small Alix Olson has been called a “spoken word diva,” a “road poet on a mission” and a “word warrior.” She calls her voice her “weapon of choice” and her powerful work contains equal doses of humor, anger and compassion. A champion slam poet, Olson introduced the new urban literary genre to Europe at Rotterdam’s Poetry International. As an activist, she’s been honored for her exceptional commitment to social justice in Washington D.C. But at the same time, a conservative women’s organization put her on their list of Ten Most Dangerous Women in America.


Segments (9:00-23:59)

Studs Terkel in Conversation with American Poets (Series)

Produced by The WFMT Radio Network

In celebration of Poetry Month the WFMT Radio Network offers three short programs featuring highlights from the Studs Terkel Radio Archive and new commentary by poet and president of The Poetry Foundation Robert Polito.

Most recent piece in this series:

Poetry Month Special: Studs Terkel in Conversation with American Poets, Episode 3

From The WFMT Radio Network | Part of the Studs Terkel in Conversation with American Poets series | 14:20

Terkel_headshot_small These are the first in a forthcoming series of programs from the Studs Terkel Radio Archive. These programs may be broadcast and/or embedded on stations’ websites. 

For more information about this special please contact:
Tony Macaluso at tmacaluso@wfmt.com (p) 773-279-2114
Estlin Usher at eusher@wfmt.com (p) 773-279-2112

PPW 01: Alabama

From Nick Szuberla | Part of the Prison Poetry Workshop Podcasts series | 13:53

Sit in any prison classroom or recreation room and ask: How many writers are in the room? How many people are writing rhymes or poems? Carefully-folded pieces of paper come out of pockets – words written in tightly stylized hand-writing. As we listen to these poems we realize they hold a deep significance to our understanding of American culture and its tradition of democratic arts.

Avatars-000040687783-pr3r20-t500x500_small The Prison Poetry Workshop traveled to Alabama and met the Alabama Prison Arts and Education Project, a part of Auburn University, which serves prisons across the state. APAEP believes it's important for the adult prison population to gain an education and access to the arts. Join us as we listen in on their writing workshop.

Alabama Prison Arts and Education Project

Learn more about the Prison Poetry Workshop radio series.

Passing Stranger: The East Village Walking Tour

From HowSound | 12:34

Pejk Malinovksy on producing audio tours including Passing Stranger: The East Village Poetry Walk.

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It used to be people would say "Oh, the 1940s and 50s, that was the Golden Age of radio." Maybe ten years ago they were right.

Now, I'd say the 2010s are Golden Age of Radio. Take radio itself then add on satellite radio, HD radio, the internet, podcasts, mobile devices... the deluge of audio content is ridiculous. And, I didn't even mention audio tours, the topic on this edition of HowSound.

Radio producer Pejk Malinovski has ventured into the world of producing audio tours. He thinks other radio producers should, too, if for no other reason than they both use the same tools and skill set. Pejk's first audio tour production was Passing Stranger: The East Village Poetry Walk . On HowSound, Pejk talks about the tour and some of the differences between producing for radio and producing for a tour.

You should be sure to visit the Passing Stranger site AFTER you listen to the podcast. It's fascinating to see how they repurposed the audio tour for the web. Insanely clever, I'd say.

Happy listening!

Rob

"If You See Something" by John Mulrooney

From Sean Cole | 09:01

This is a poem by Boston area poet and Suffolk University professor John Mulrooney, recorded at the Boston Poetry Massacre on July 30, 2004.

Default-piece-image-1 Maybe it was because the convention had just ended. Maybe it was something else. But the air was more charged than usual at the Boston Poetry Massacre this year. This marathon of poetry readings, sixty or so, all packed into one weekend, is an annual tradition here. Since it began in 1998, it's had many organizers, and many names: The Boston Poetry Conference, The Boston Alternative Poetry Conference, The Boston Poetry Marathon and last year's more utilitarian "60 at MIT." This year's title, "massacre," fit the impression that everyone was reciting their work as though their life depended on it. The event began just hours after John Kerry had delivered his acceptance speech to delegates at the Democratic National Convention, just a few miles down the road from Wordsworth Books in Cambridge, MA, where the readings were held. All week we'd been hearing that Kerry needed to give the speech of his lifetime. And whether he did or not, many of the poets at the Massacre seemed to give the readings of their lifetimes, John Mulrooney included. Last year, Mulrooney began his reading with a quote from Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld (or D.H. Rumsfeld as he called him), lovingly reciting the words as though it were an Emily Dickinson poem. So this year, when he got behind the podium and said "I'd like to dedicate my reading to the department of homeland security" I thought he was joking. But what followed was one of the most haunting, relentless and evocative poems I have ever heard, equal parts Dylan Thomas and Allen Ginsberg, all sewn together with the refrain "If you see something, say something," which seemed to gather new meaning every time he said it. It occurs to me that that's a poet's job, saying something when they see something. They don't need to be asked. So when they *are* asked, the result is going to sound something like this.

"If These Walls Could Talk: Inside Youth Speak Out" SEASON TWO

From Susan Stone | 14:58

"IF THESE WALLS COULD TALK: Inside Youth Speak Out" is a poetry series drawn from testimonial writings by the youngest members of America's prison system.

Written and recorded by the authors themselves (under their chosen pen names) in juvenile halls throughout California from Summer, 2010 through January, 2011. They are very pleased to present Season Two.

Susanstone_small While in Juvenile Hall, detained and incarcerated youth are invited to participate in writing and conversation workshops.  Led by local writers and teachers, these evening sessions are designed to help the youth dig deep and seek insights through writing and drawing into childhoods and teen years so often defeated by aspects of the lives they have lived so far.  Their poems and stories draw on deeply personal narratives and testimonials to regret, remorse, hope, and resolve. 

In this way, these young men, women, boys and girls in detention can live out loud in a world that often forgets them.

"If These Walls Could Talk: Inside Youth Speak Out" SEASON ONE

From Susan Stone | 23:41

"IF THESE WALLS COULD TALK: Inside Youth Speak Out" is a poetry series drawn from testimonial writings by the youngest members of America's prison system.

Juv1_small While in Juvenile Hall, detained and incarcerated youth are invited to participate in weekly writing and conversation workshops which encourage them to dig deep, and seek meaningful insights through thought-provoking topics.

These young men, women, girls and boys reveal childhoods and teen years so often defeated by aspects of the lives they have lived so far. They address things, people, or events that are critical to acknowledge during rehabilitation before returning to their homes, schools, and communities.

Living out loud through rap, rhyme, and essay, these youth see the web as a portal --a way to let loose their stories in hopes others might put an ear to the wall and hear who they really are. Here, 20 writers read their own works, sometimes lending a voice to one another's.

Produced by Susan Stone with the boys and girls of San Francisco's Juvenile Justice Center, and the support of Malcolm Marshall, Youth Speaks, and the inspiration of David Inocencio and The Beat Within.

Harvard Critic Helen Vendler on Emily Dickinson

From Jenny Attiyeh | 18:02

When Helen Vendler was only 13, the future poetry critic and Harvard professor memorized several of Emily Dickinson’s more famous poems. They’ve stayed with her over the years, and today, she talks with ThoughtCast’s Jenny Attiyeh about one poem in particular that’s haunted her all this time. It’s called "I cannot live with You-".

According to Vendler, whose authoritative "Dickinson: Selected Poems and Commentaries" has recently been published, it’s a heartbreaking poem of an unresolvable dilemma, and ensuing despair.

Emilydickinson_small

When Helen Vendler was only 13, the future poetry critic and Harvard professor memorized several of Emily Dickinson’s more famous poems. They’ve stayed with her over the years, and today, she talks with ThoughtCast’s Jenny Attiyeh about one poem in particular that’s haunted her all this time.  It’s called I cannot live with You-
According to Vendler, whose authoritative Dickinson: Selected Poems and Commentaries has recently been published, it’s a heartbreaking poem of an unresolvable dilemma, and ensuing despair.

This interview is the first in a new ThoughtCast series which examines a specific piece of writing — be it a poem, play, novel, short story, work of non-fiction or scrap of papyrus — that’s had a significant influence on the interviewee, that’s shaped and moved them.

Up next – esteemed novelist and short story writer Tom Perrotta discusses Good Country People,  a short story by Flannery O’Connor that’s particularly meaningful to him.

The War of the Gods

From Matthew Cowley | 12:13

Epic poem about the Ali-Frazier fight (The Thriller in Manila) by James Tokley.

Aliglove_small James Tokley is the Poet Laureate of Tampa, FL. A professor told him there were no more epic poems because there were no more epic heroes; Tokley decided that Muhammad Ali was one, and so he wrote this poem. It was produced with sound effects and music, and presented in a showcase of his poetry on WMNF's radio theater show.


Cutaways (5:00-8:59)

PoetryNow with the Poetry Foundation (Series)

Produced by The WFMT Radio Network

In time for National Poetry Month (April) , the Poetry Foundation and the WFMT Radio Network are offering PoetryNow, a series of 5-minute radio pieces that feature some of today’s most accomplished and innovative poets reading and sharing insights on new and as-yet unpublished poems. Whether you’re a poetry expert, or just curious about what is happening in poetry today, PoetryNow is an acoustically rich source for listening in on the writing process of living poets you know and for discovering new voices. The first season includes John Ashbery, Rae Armantrout, Frank Bidart, Eileen Myles, and many others.

Most recent piece in this series:

PN 17-05 "Memorial Day" by Sunnylyn Thibodeaux

From The WFMT Radio Network | Part of the PoetryNow with the Poetry Foundation series | 04:00

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Sunnylyn Thibodeaux Biography

Sunnylyn Thibodeaux is the author of Universal Fall Precautions (Spuyten Duyvil, 2017), As Water Sounds (Bootstrap, 2014), and Palm to Pine (Bootstrap, 2011). She is also the author of over a dozen small books, including 20/20 Yielding (Blue Press), 88 Haiku for Lorca (Push Press), Against What Light (Ypolita), Room Service Calls (Lew Gallery Editions), and What’s Going On (Bird & Beckett). In 1999 she moved from Louisiana to the San Francisco Bay area to attend the now-defunct New College of California.

Thibodeaux coedits Auguste Press and Lew Gallery Editions. She lives in San Francisco with her husband, poet Micah Ballard, and their daughter Lorca.

Bio: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poets/detail/sunnylyn-thibodeaux

Physics for Poets

From Lu Olkowski | 07:17

People often depict scientists as coldly rational. Physicist Michael Salamon takes issue with that. He explains how Walt Whitman misunderstood the beauty of the universe. And how Maxwell's Equations gave him his first "cerebral orgasm"

Andromeda_small People often depict scientists as eggheads who don't appreciate beauty. Physicist Michael Salamon, who works at NASA's Universe Division, takes issue with that. He references Walt Whitman's "When I heard the learn'd astronomer" from Leaves of Grass and argues that the poem perpetuates a myth of the scientist as a bookworm who doesn't appreciate beauty. He asserts that exactly the opposite is true: aesthetics have driven Michael's career as a scientist. And the careers of many scientists who he knows. In this piece, Michael helps the lay listener appreciate the absolute gorgeousness of complex equations and discoveries. First broadcast on PRI's Studio 360 on September 14, 2006.

The Doors - Ray Manzarek

From Cyrus Emerson | 07:16

Ray Manzarek talks about his passion for music and poetry and the literary legacy of the Doors.

Ray_manzarek_small Ray Manzarek talks about his passion for music and poetry and the literary legacy of the Doors.

Oakland Scenes: Snapshots of a Community

From Youth Radio | 05:45

Youth Radio chronicles life in Oakland, California, where an alarming number of youth homicides has weighed heavily on the community.

Default-piece-image-2 Youth Radio chronicles life in Oakland, California, where an alarming number of youth homicides has weighed heavily on the community. The story uses as its centerpiece a poem by Ise Lyfe -- a retelling of Romeo and Juliet. The killings have been a major topic of conversation in Oakland among youth, from young poets, to teens gathered on the sidewalk, to kids taking the bus home from school. A high percentage of the victims are youth, sometimes as many as three in a single week. Youth Radio documents the words of young residents in street corner conversations in East Oakland, the neighborhood where much of the violence has taken place. The voices are Youth Radio's Gerald Ward II, Bianca Yarborough, her mom Bridget Taylor, and poet Ise Lyfe.

Poetry

From Radio Rookies | 06:48

Bronx teen Judith Rudge turns to poetry to express her experience as an outsider.

Playing
Poetry
From
Radio Rookies

Judithmural_small Since she moved to the Bronx from Suriname at age 12, Judith hasn't felt she fits in with any group. Dutch is her first language. She wants to be an opera singer. She's black. In Junior High, her peers wondered why she couldn't sing like 'Monica.' In High School, she remembers a girl from an African-American club telling her, "Dutch is not a Black language." She did not take up arms, as some outsiders have -- instead she took up poetry.

Creation Poem

From Littleglobe | 08:05

Award winning and nationally acclaimed Native American students from the Santa Fe Indian School's Spoken Word Club perform "Creation Poem".

Playing
Creation Poem
From
Littleglobe

Default-piece-image-1 Youth producer, Dolna Smithback, along with her co-host, Gabe Rima, interviewed six members of the award winning and nationally acclaimed Santa Fe Indian School's Spoken Word Club. Dolna and Gabe heard pieces that the Spoken Word Club performed at different jams and competitions. This is a group piece called: "Creation Poem" by poets: April Chavez, Nolan Eskeets, Jimmy Coriz, and Santana Shorty; all who are members of the Santa Fe Indian School Spoken Word Club, directed by Tim McLaughlin. The students' inspiration for the poem comes from Native American ancestors, traditions, family members, dreams, and spirit guides.

Hunting Poet

From Jesse Dukes | 08:21

Poet John Casteen hunts for deer and inspiration in Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains.

Playing
Hunting Poet
From
Jesse Dukes

Jd_johnreading17_small   Poets have always taken inspiration from nature.  Think of Robert Frost swinging on birches, or Emily Dickinson envying the grass.   But these days, it may be a little odd to think of the academic poet—safely ensconced in a liberal college town—as a deer hunter.  John Casteen the Fourth is a poet who teaches at Sweet Briar College in Virginia.  And he goes deer hunting whenever he can.  One of his poems “Nighthunting” was featured in this year’s Best American poetry series.  Producer Jesse Dukes—not a hunter--wondered what the connection was between hunting and poetry.  So Casteen invited him on a camping and hunting trip to find out.  

CURIUM: E.E. CUMMINGS FRIED IN A HARD DRIVE

From John Diliberto | 07:27

Musician Evan Sorenstein combines e.e. cummings' poetry with electronic music.

Cummings_small April is National Poetry Month CURIUM: E.E. CUMMINGS FRIED IN A HARD DRIVE A POET GETS DIGITIZED E.E. Cummings was a poet in word and form, sculpting his verse in graphic designs and synthesist Evan Sorenstein has plugged into this. Under his recording guise as Curium he's made a beguiling recording, setting charming readings of Cummings poetry, read by a 3-year-old girl, an 80-something grandmother and everyone in between. Processed, stretched and distorted, he's set their words in a subtle ambient soundscape on the album Nowever. Curium talks about a poetry and music disc that transcends the form. Kimberly Haas reports.

Poetry Combine

From Hearing Voices | Part of the Larry Massett stories series | 08:06

Andrei Codresu (ExquisiteCorpse.org) takes a trio of his poetry students from Louisiana State University and introduces them to the poets on the streets of the French Quarter in New Orleans.

Lmacpoetcombine150_small Andrei Codresu (ExquisiteCorpse.org) takes a trio of his poetry students from Louisiana State University and introduces them to the poets on the streets of the French Quarter in New Orleans. The assignment: write poems about the people they met. The combine encounters a hot dog vendor, a stripper and a club owner. Premiered on NPR All Things Considered.


Drop-Ins (2:00-4:59)

99% Invisible #59- Some Other Sign That People Do Not Totally Regret Life (Standard 4:30 version)

From Roman Mars | Part of the 99% Invisible (Standard Length) series | 04:29

Call it a "fentence."

99invisible-logo-square-for_prx_small

Sean Cole is a poet and he knows what you think of that.

He is also a radio producer. One night, drunk and stumbling around the Hudson River with his friend Malissa O’Donnell, he discovered a monument — two of them actually — to two of his poetry heroes. Apropos of the name of this show, the tribute wasn’t very obvious. In fact, he and Malissa nearly walked right past it. Still, embedded in the architecture of a 25 year old plaza were the words of Walt Whitman and Frank O’Hara. And weirdly, Sean had he’d been reciting from O’Hara’s Lunch Poems just minutes before.

Thus began Sean’s quest to talk to the people whose idea this was — forging a largely unloved art form into a permanent fixture of the cultural landscape. Along the way he talks with urban landscape architect M. Paul Friedberg, former Battery Park official Richard Kahan and none other than Frank O’Hara’s younger sister, Maureen O’Hara.

Sean Cole and Malissa O’Donnell both work for WNYC’s Radiolab. And Sean is also a 99-percentilist from way back.

1976 Allen Ginsberg - End Vietnam War

From Naropa University | Part of the Jack Kerouac Disembodied School of Poetics series | 04:16

great pro peace performance by Ginsberg

Default-piece-image-2 Ginsberg in 1976 sings a still relevant, moving, touching poem about peace, the environment, and American imperialism. THIS IS A GEM!!! This piece is from Naropa University Archive's Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics collection. Allen Ginsberg founded the Kerouac School, a writing program, in 1974, and for 30 years he brought a group of counter culture writers, artists and thinkers to Boulder for a Summer Program. Naropa's Audio Archive is digitizing 2000 hours of readings, lectures and panel discussions, several hundred hours of which is available for free at www.archive.org. Click through 'audio' to 'naropa' and browse. The piece has never been broadcast - you will be among the first to make this rare recording available to listeners.

Warrior Poets

From Salt Institute for Documentary Studies | 05:11

In 2009, the Portland Police Department faced down a daunting task: writing poetry.

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In 2009, the Portland Police Department faced down a daunting task: writing poetry.

"Autobiography" by Joe Brainard

From This Land Press | Part of the Poetry to the People series | 03:30

In his poem "Autobiography," Joe Brainard tells us who he is. Some of the things that make him unique challenge the status quo of 1950s Tulsa, where Brainard spent his childhood. In this edition of Poetry to the People, readers share their thoughts and experiences with homosexuality and the struggle of being a minority. Full text below.

Autobiography_photo_small "Autobiography," by Joe Brainard 

----I was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1942.
----No, I wasn’t. I was born in Salem, Arkansas in 1942. I always say I was born in Tulsa tho. Because we moved there when I was only a few months old. So that’s where I grew up. In Tulsa, Oklahoma.
----A lot has happened between then and now, but somehow, today, I just don’t feel like writing about it. It doesn’t seem all that interesting. And it’s just too complicated.
----What’s important is that I’m a painter and a writer. Queer. Insecure about my looks. And I need to please people too much. I work very hard. I’d give my right arm to be madly in love. (Well, my left.) And I’m optimistic about tomorrow. (Optimistic about myself, not about the world.) I’m crazy about people. Not very intelligent. But smart. I want too much. What I want most is to open up. I keep trying.
 

Twin Cities' Slam Poets

From KFAI | Part of the 10,000 Fresh Voices series | 04:54

Each month, slam poets take the stage at bars around the Twin Cities to compete for local acclaim and audience approval. Each year, a handful of locals compete against teams from across the nation, and consistently return home from the National Slam with high rankings and national prominence. Three young poets recently took their work on the road. KFAI producers Mark Koerner and Allegra Oxborough caught up with the men behind The Good News Poetry.

2012slamteam_small Each month, slam poets take the stage at bars around the Twin Cities to compete for local acclaim and audience approval. Each year, a handful of locals compete against teams from across the nation, and consistently return home from the National Slam with high rankings and national prominence. Three young poets recently took their work on the road. KFAI producers Mark Koerner and Allegra Oxborough caught up with the men behind The Good News Poetry.

Louder Than a Bomb 2012 (Series)

Produced by WBEZ

Chicago Public Media (WBEZ-Chicago) presents the latest series of studio recordings featuring finalists from the 2012 Louder Than a Bomb Teen Poetry Festival and Competition. The annual teen poetry slam engages schools and community organizations from all over the Chicago area.

Most recent piece in this series:

Dear First Grade Teacher by AJ Tran

From WBEZ | Part of the Louder Than a Bomb 2012 series | 02:38

Ltab2012_aj_small Poet AJ Tran, 18, is a senior at Northside College Prep. This is the second year she has represented her school at Louder Than a Bomb, which advanced to the Final round of competition in the 2012 Festival. Dear First Grade Teacher is AJ's poetic commentary on gender, how our society teaches young children what 'girls' can do and what 'boys' can do, without leaving enough room for those who may think otherwise.

Poetry Bus

From Jake Warga | 04:54

A short ride on the "poetry bus".

Playing
Poetry Bus
From
Jake Warga

Pb4_small On assignment: ride the "poetry bus" http://www.poetrybus.com/ Aired 12/8/2006 http://www.studio360.org/episodes/2006/12/08

Poetry Happens

From Paul McDonald | 02:04

Poetry is just as combustible and wild an art form as it always has been. An interesting commentary on poetry's past and future.

Kerouac_small Two minutes, four seconds. Straight Commentary.

Poetry to the People (Series)

Produced by This Land Press

Poetry to the People gets poetry off the page and takes it to the street.

Most recent piece in this series:

"thrtthr whthrrthms" by Maria Damon

From This Land Press | Part of the Poetry to the People series | 05:31

534399042_f02cab2ac8_b_small Poetry transforms this space. friendly takeover?

What is Poetry?

From Hearing Voices | Part of the Wandering Jew stories series | 03:36

Sandburg on poetry

Bgpoetry_small Carl Sandburg reads poems and talks poetry, to the (original) music of Skyward.

A Large, Well-Rounded Head

From Michelle Legro | Part of the Storyville series | 03:01

The strange journey of Walt Whitman's brain, both inside his head, and out.

Walt-whitman-brady_small The author of Leaves of Grass was an avid fan of phrenology, the study of the shape of the human skull. When he died, a group of Philadelphia surgeons rushed to his bedside in order to get at the poet's brain, with disastrous results. 

A Prohibition

From Terin Mayer | 04:27

Three students reflect on what it means to be "Black" at Carleton College.

Playing
A Prohibition
From
Terin Mayer

Terinandkayeen_small Originally curated for a temporary museum installation at Carleton College, "A Prohibition" is a poetic contemplation of campus race relations. What do you mean when you say the word "black"? Why can't you say the word "nigger"? Three African American students navigate the language of identity.


Interstitials (Under 2:00)

Radio

From David Weinberg | Part of the Random Tape series | :51

A poem by Alec Hershman.

Playing
Radio
From
David Weinberg

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This poem appears in the October, 2011 issue of SOFTBLOW     

Alec Hershman lives in St. Louis where he teaches at St. Louis Community College and at the Center for Humanities at Washington University. His poems can be found in upcoming issues of Denver Quarterly, The Journal, The Burnside Review, Sycamore Review, Juked, and online at Transom , Anti- , Sixth Finch and The Fiddlehead . He is currently poetry editor for The White Whale Review .

At Klipsan Beach

From David Weinberg | Part of the Random Tape series | :38

A Poem by James Arthur.

Random_tape_logo_600x600_small James Arthurr's poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The New Republic, Poetry, Ploughshares, The Southern Review, New England Review, and Narrative. He has received the Amy Lowell Traveling Poetry Scholarship, a Wallace Stegner Fellowship in Poetry. His book Charms Against Lighting was recently published by Copper Canyon.

James Earl Jones Reads Shakespeare's Sonnet #55

From National Endowment for the Arts | Part of the Literary Moments series | 01:26

Actor James Earl Jones reads Shakespeare's Sonnet #55.

Shakesmoments_small This Literary Moment is part of the NEA's Shakespearean Moments. Shakespearean Moments highlight the NEA initiative Shakespeare in American Communities. Shakespeare in American Communities is the largest tour of Shakespeare in American history, having brought new Shakespeare productions and special in-school programs to more than 1,200 communities, military and civilian, across all 50 states.

Poetry Off the Shelf (Series)

Produced by Curtis Fox

Poetry Off the Shelf is a production of The Poetry Foundation. It features audio of contemporary poems read by poets and by actors, along with suggested intros and outros. The poems range from :30 to 2:30.

Most recent piece in this series:

Chicagoans Consider Their Road Not Taken

From Curie Youth Radio | 01:53

Robert Frost's famous poem helps Chicagoans reflect on their own paths.

Aic_small Chicagoans recite Frost's  "The Road Not Taken" and talk about their choices, regrets, and victories.

1989 Joanne Kyger - Springtime Adonis Poem

From Naropa University | Part of the Jack Kerouac Disembodied School of Poetics series | 01:52

One of the few Beat-era women writers reads her work.

Default-piece-image-0 Joanne Kyger is one of the still-living poets from the Beat era. Her writing focuses on the environment and contemplative themes. This heartful piece comes from an 89 reading at Naropa University. This piece is from Naropa University Archive's Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics collection. Allen Ginsberg founded the Kerouac School, a writing program, in 1974, and for 30 years he brought a group of counter culture writers, artists and thinkers to Boulder for a Summer Program. Naropa's Audio Archive is digitizing 2000 hours of readings, lectures and panel discussions, several hundred hours of which is available for free at www.archive.org. Click through 'audio' to 'naropa' and browse. Kyger is a frequent visiting instructor at the Summer Writing Program. The piece has never been broadcast - you will be among the first to make this rare recording available to listeners.

Short List #2

From David Green | Part of the Short Lists series | :49

A collaborative “Short List” poem which sheds light on the thoughts, secrets, senses of humor and lives of eight and nine-year-olds. Can you figure out what a blender, shrunken heads and anchovies have in common before you are told at the end? Check out all of the Short List pieces!

Playing
Short List #2
From
David Green

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As part of a two week, all-school (K-12) Poetry Festival at North Shore Country Day School in Winnetka, IL, Third Grade Audio produced our first “Short Lists” for one of the poetry assemblies.

We first learned about Short Lists from producer Jay Allison during his keynote speech at the 2007 Third Coast International Audio Festival Conference.

As part of a two week, all-school (K-12) Poetry Festival at North Shore Country Day School in Winnetka, IL, Third Grade Audio produced our first “Short Lists” for one of the poetry assemblies.

We first learned about Short Lists from producer Jay Allison during his keynote speech at the 2007 Third Coast International Audio Festival Conference.

What is a Short List? “It's a list you create from your experience or research or daily life. You read it out loud for about 60 seconds and then tell us at the end what the list WAS." (transom.org)

Here at Third Grade Audio, we think of them as a combination of a list poem and a riddle. We wrote Short Lists of all kinds and then took some of our favorite topics written by individual third graders and created group Short Lists – writing, recording and producing them jointly.

Each Spring, a new set of third graders adds to our Short List series.

Third Grade Audio
"See" the world through third grade ears

"Youth, Day, Old Age, & Night" by Walt Whitman, recited by 6-yr.-old Gareth

From Aaron Sanders | :48

Six-year-old Gareth has a voice made for poetry. He recites Walt Whitman's "Youth, Day, Old Age & Night."

Lumberyardwelcomesquare_small Six-year-old Gareth has a voice made for poetry. He recites regularly for a radio magazine called "The Lumberyard." Listening to these classic poems recited by a child is like hearing them for the first time. In this series, Gareth recites two poems by William Blake, "The Little Boy Lost" and "The Chimney Sweeper"; Walt Whitman's, "Youth, Day, Old Age and Night"; and an excerpt from Walden by Henry David Thoreau. These are engaging, enchanting poetic moments, perfect for National Poetry Month.

Prison Poetry Workshop (Series)

Produced by Nick Szuberla

Sending radio waves through prison walls we reach an audience with content that may change their life. The Prison Poetry Workshop is the only national radio series linking prisoners to the outside world through the power of poetry. Each program has an interactive writing exercise lead by a nationally renowned poet that invites all listeners to submit a poem to the Prison Poetry Workshop.

Sit in any prison classroom or recreation room and ask: How many writers are in the room? How many people are writing rhymes or poems? Carefully-folded pieces of paper come out of pockets – words written in tightly stylized hand-writing. As we listen to these poems we realize they hold a deep significance to our understanding of American culture and its tradition of democratic arts.

Most recent piece in this series:

PPW - Indiana: Etheridge Knight

From Nick Szuberla | Part of the Prison Poetry Workshop series | 54:09

Etheridge-knight_small Prison Poetry Workshop 
Indiana: Etheridge Knight

Host: Rend Smith 
Producer: Andrew Parsons and Nick Szuberla 

Segment - A: Early Days
Knight spent his boyhood days on a farm in Corinth Mississippi. There, he lived the idyllic life, working and playing alongside a large brood of brothers and sisters, we learn from Knight’s surviving siblings. But he also pined for adventure, stealing off  to rowdy pool halls whenever he had the chance.  In such establishments, Knight would’ve found men “telling toasts” (performing memorized, African-American folk poems), a skill he picked up and mastered. By 16, Knight was off on a more fraught adventure, as he enlisted to fight in the Korean war.

Segment - B:PRISON & A WORKSHOP

Taped to the wall of my cell are 47 pictures: 47 black
faces: my father, mother, grandmothers (1 dead), grand-
fathers (both dead), brothers, sisters, uncles, aunts,
cousins (1st and 2nd),  

Returning from the war, Knight began what he called his “mad years.”  We hear about how, having picked up a heroin addiction in the army, the veteran found himself  in and out of trouble with police.  In 1960, Knight was convicted of armed robbery and sentenced to 10-25 years in prison. While behind bars, his love for telling toasts grew into a general appreciation for poetry. Knight wrote prolifically, was discovered by Pulitzer Prize winning poet Gwendolyn Brooks, and released not long after he published his first book.  Former Michigan poet laureate Norbert Krapf considers Knight’s story inspirational, and crafts a writing exercise for listeners based on a poem dedicated to him.

SEGMENT C THE FAMOUS ETHERIDGE KNIGHT

We meet Dwayne Betts. If Etheridge Knight has a young literary heir, it might be him. Betts went to prison at 16 after being convicted of carjacking, but has since launched a successful writing career. He, like some other poets we hear from, credits Knight as a strong influence. We also meet Francis Stoller, who spent time with the poet during his last days. “I will write well. I will be a famous writer. I will work hard and my work will be good. I will be a famous writer. My voice will be heard and I will help my people,” Knight once wrote. The voices we hear prove he succeeded.

 

Broadcast Window Begins 01/13/14

The First Season of Prison Poetry Workshop will be available beginning January 13, 2014, on PRX without charge to all public radio stations, and may be aired an unlimited number of times prior to January 13, 2015. The program may be streamed live on station websites but not archived. Excerpting is permitted for promotional purposes only.

Prison Poetry Workshop is produced by Nick Szuberla and Andrew Parsons, with host Rend Smith.  Visit www.prisonpoetryworkshop.org for useful tools and ways to get your audience involved.  Major funding for PPW is from the National Endowment for the Arts.  Contact Nick Szuberla for more information: nick@workingnarratives.org
 

 

 

The Nightfly #2015.15 - Poetry Month Special - April 13-19, 2015

From WERU | Part of the UpFront Soul (formerly The Nightfly with Sanguine Fromage) series | 01:57:59

We'll hear poets- many from the Harlem Renaissance and Black Arts Movements- reading their work, along with poetry set to music, and hip-hop. We'll hear from Nikki Giovanni, Langston Hughes, Gil Scott-Heron, and many more!

Nikki_giovanni_small We'll hear poets- many from the Harlem Renaissance and Black Arts Movements- reading their work, along with poetry set to music, and hip-hop... poetry with a beat. We'll hear from Nikki Giovanni, Langston Hughes, Gil Scott-Heron, and many more!

The Nightfly #2015.15
Hour 1
Joan Armatrading "Back to the Night"
 Blackalicious "Ego Tripping by Nikki Giovanni"
 Margaret Walker "For My People"
 Reuben Wilson "Inner City Blues"
 The Last Poets with Bernard Purdie "Blessed Are Those Who Struggle"
 Ballad Of Birmingham "Jerry Moore"
 Claude McKay "If We Must Die"
 Yusef Lateef "Russell And Eliot"
 Arrested Development "Freedom"
 Cassandra Wilson "Strange Fruit"
 Countee Cullen "Heritage"
 Miles Davis "Once Upon A Summertime"
 Maya Angelou "Africa"
 Kim Weston "Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing"
 Langston Hughes "I Too"
 Eddie Harris "1974 Blues"
 Peabody & Sherman "They've Always Known"
 Gil Scott-Heron "Whitey On The Moon"
 Nina Simone "Backlash Blues"
 Nikki Giovanni "Beautiful Black Men"
 Harlem Underground Band "Fed Up (Instrumental)"
Hour 2
 Sweet Honey In the Rock "On Children"
 Nikki Giovanni & The New York Community Choir "Like a Ripple on a Pond"
 Sterling Brown "Ma Rainey"
 Bobby Broom "D's Blues"
 Grandmaster Flash & the Furious Five "I Am Somebody"
 Oscar Brown Jr "40 Acres and a Mule"
 Arna Bontemps "The Daybreakers"
 Horace Silver "Doodlin'"
 Gwendolyn Brooks "Song of the Front Yard"
 Duke Ellington "C Jam Blues"
 A Tribe Called Quest "After Hours"
 Intelligent Hoodlum "Black and Proud"
 Jasmine Mans "Birmingham"
 Nikki Giovanni "The Rose That Grew From Concrete"
 Lecrae "Welcome to America"
 Sonia Sanchez "When Ure Heart Turns Cold"
 Brand Nubian "Love Vs. Hate"
 Lauryn Hill "Final Hour"
 Sam Cooke "Havin' a Party"