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Playlist: World AIDS Day

Compiled By: PRX Editors

 Credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/pressthebuttononthetop/">Danny Williams</a>
Image by: Danny Williams 
Curated Playlist

World AIDS Day is Dec. 1.

Below are picks chosen by PRX editorial staff. You can see all potential pieces for World AIDS Day by using our search.

Featured Pieces

These three pieces may be of particular interest to your station.

Dying Words: The AIDS Reporting of Jeffrey Schmalz

From Kerry Donahue | 53:59

Twenty-five years ago, New York Times reporter Jeffrey Schmalz ended up in the middle of one of the biggest stories of our time: He had AIDS. His writing about the disease changed journalism and himself.

Schmalz_headprx350_small

Dying Words, hosted by Rachel Maddow, is about Jeff Schmalz and the groundbreaking reporting he did on AIDS for the New York Times even as he was dying of the disease in the early 1990s. Through Jeff's story, it also describes the experiences of gay and lesbian journalists during a much less tolerant time in major news organizations.

Jeff Schmalz was a prodigiously talented, fast-rising editor at the New York Times - he stayed closeted from the newsroom management, especially A.M. "Abe" Rosenthal, a brilliant but homophobic executive editor. In late December 1990, Jeff had a seizure at his desk. He was soon diagnosed with AIDS - his T-cell count was two and he had PML, a AIDS related brain infection usually fatal within months. Astonishingly, Jeff responded well to AZT and was able to return to work within the year. When he did, he returned on a mission: to report and write a series of deeply felt articles about the human toll of the AIDS epidemic. He pushed the Times' boundaries and changed journalism. 

Jeff died in 1993, just a month before his 40th birthday, and over the years since then, Sam Freedman's own mission has been to preserve Jeff's story for posterity. That effort has taken the form of this public radio documentary and a companion book by the same name, published by CUNY Journalism Press, December 1, 2015. Sam Freedman is the author of seven non-fiction books, a former reporter for the New York Times, and an professor for more than two decades at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. 

The documentary features archival audio from interviews with Jeff Schmalz by ABC News in the first half of 1993, as well as other archival materials provided by Jeff's sister, Wendy Schmalz including interviews with President Bill Clinton and Magic Johnson. Other key sources heard in the documentary include best-selling author Anna Quindlen, New Yorker writer Michael Spector, New York magazine editor Adam Moss, New York Times reporters Adam Nagourney and David Dunlap, former New York Times reporters Richard Meislin and Michael Norman, former New York Times News Editor Allan Siegal, AIDS activist Mary Fisher, journalist and historian Eric Marcus, and Jeff's sister Wendy Schmalz and her husband Michael Wilde.

LiveHopeLove

From Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting | 53:00

Poet and writer Kwame Dawes travels to Jamaica to explore the experience of people living with HIV/AIDS and to examine how the disease has shaped their lives. Dawes' poems, inspired by their stories, take this documentary into deep realms of the heart.

Aids_small HIV/AIDS is defined by people: their complex lives, their bravery, their fear, their sadness, their need, their laughter, their inconsistencies--basically, their rich humanity. LiveHopeLove looks at the universal problems faced by people with HIV/AIDS, through the specific lens of Jamaica, where almost no one is unaffected by the disease. What are the unique realities of this small island state that set its HIV/AIDS sufferers apart from those in the rest of the world? Poet and writer Kwame Dawes travels to Jamaica to explore the experience of people living with HIV/AIDS and to examine how the disease has shaped their lives. Dawes' poems, inspired by their stories, take this documentary into deep realms of the heart.

LiveHopeLove: HIV/AIDS in Jamaica is the second of two multimedia reporting initiatives undertaken by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting with support from the MAC AIDS Fund.

Visit LiveHopeLove.com to explore the interactive website with rich photography, the complete set of Kwame's poems, short video documentaries and musical interpretations of the poems.

The radio documentary is produced by Stephanie Guyer-Stevens and Jack Chance of Outer Voices, in association with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.

Thembi's AIDS Diary

From Radio Diaries | 27:09

South Africa has the largest number of people with HIV/AIDS in the world. More than five million South Africans are HIV-positive. Thembi was one of them. For a year, she carried a tape recorder and kept an audio diary of her struggle to live with AIDS. A beautiful animation of this piece was made by CalArts student Jisoo Kim. Grab the embed code and put it on your website as a companion to airing the piece.

Thembipicture_small South Africa has the largest number of people with HIV/AIDS in the world. More than five million South Africans are HIV positive. Thembi is one of them. For the past year, she has been carrying a tape recorder and keeping an audio diary of her struggle to live with AIDS. For photographs, background information, and the AIDS Action Toolkit, visit: http://www.radiodiaries.org/?p=319 


Hour (49:00-1:00:00)

HV Special: Portrait of a Plague (AIDS Awareness)

From Hearing Voices | Part of the Hearing Voices series | 59:00

Stories of AIDS Awareness. Free to stations.

Redribbon220_small PORTRAIT OF A PLAGUE, a FREE one-hour (((HearingVoices))) Special for the week of World AIDS Awareness Day (Friday December 1 2002) Hosted by Joe Richman (from RadioDiaries.org). PORTRAIT OF A PLAGUE, Stories of AIDS Awareness: It's "Just Another Day At the Biggest Hospital In the World" in Soweto -- 2000 patients check in daily, half are HIV positive, host Joe Richman follows Sister Agnes Ramishiga on her shift. American RadioWorks' producers Stephan Smith and Stephanie Curtis give tape-recorders to three HIV-Positive teens in "The Positive Life." Dave Isay's "Letters to Butchie" are a dying mother?s letters to a son she'll never see. We hear selections from "And Trouble Came: An African AIDS Diary," a musical narrative by composer Laura Kaminsky. There's a poem by Lisa Buscani, an essay by Krandall Kraus, and we look inside the Memory Box Project for AIDS orphans.

AIDS These Days

From Outright Radio | Part of the Outright Radio Series 2004 series | 59:00

AIDS These Days is a comprehensive look from 2004 at HIV/AIDS in the gay community including how the new treatments are seen as maintenance drugs and has fostered a rise in new infection rates.

*Some statistics mentioned may have changed since the date of production.

Aidsskyatmaitriicon_small AIDS These Days ? a comprehensive look in 2004 at HIV/AIDS in the gay community including how the new treatments are seen as maintenance drugs and has fostered a rise in new infection rates. We also hear about some of the side effects of the anti-virals and examine the issues of crystal use as a co-factor in sero-conversion. We also examine unsafe sexual practices, and the changing prevention messages.

Shattering the Stigma: Women Confront HIV/AIDS in Africa

From A World of Possibilities | Part of the Women's History Month Special series | 55:00

The HIV/AIDS pandemic continues to sweep across Africa and, unlike in the early phases of the disease, its primary victims are now women. Hear stories of mothers living with HIV, women watching their families die, and women who reveal their HIV-positive status in order to break the stigma that prevents effective action to halt this devastating scourge.

*Some statistics mentioned may have changed since the date of production.

Wpxs_small The HIV/AIDS pandemic continues to sweep across Africa and, unlike in the early phases of the disease, its primary victims are now women. Join us for the stories of mothers living with HIV, women watching their families die, and women who reveal their HIV-positive status in order to break the stigma that prevents effective action to halt this devastating scourge.

WVR - Show 355 (One Hour) - Somalia and K'naan

From World Vision Report | Part of the World Vision Report - Weekly One Hour series | 01:50:25

Two clerics in Syria -- one Muslim, one Christian -- talk openly about a subject rarely discussed in public -- HIV-AIDS. They're working to change attitudes toward the disease so people will seek detection and treatment. This week the World Vision Report also takes you to China where authorities only recently admitted that AIDS was the leading cause of death there. Those stories, tribal radio in Pakistan, selling water by the sip in Morocco, and a lot more -- all coming up this week on the World Vision Report.

Wvus_podcast_logo_300x300-upd-font_small 0:00 - 0:59 - Billboard
1:00 - 5:59 - No Audio
6:00 - 6:29 - Music Bed

Segment A
6:30 - Harpas
12:07 - Ling Ling
19:00 - 19:59 - Music Bed

Segment B
20:00 - Tribal Voices
25:00 - Success without Aid
31:34 - K'naan Music

39:00 - 39:59 - Music Bed

Segment C
40:00 - Water Seller
44:12 - Saafwater
54:21 - Saturday Night

58:59 - End

Treating the Rainbow Nation: AIDS in South Africa

From WFUV | 57:11

Visited hospices, orphanages and treatment centers, speak with those treating the disease, as well as those suffering from it. This documentary explores the roadblocks that stand in the way of stamping out the disease, namely fundamental misconceptions about HIV/AIDS among the country's poorer sects. It also looks at the challenges of treating such a large-scale pandemic.

*Some facts and statistics mentioned may have changed since the date of production.

Africa275_small This summer, I spent five weeks in South Africa gaining a first-hand account of the country's AIDS pandemic. I visited hospices, orphanages and treatment centers, and spoke with those treating the disease, as well as those suffering from it. My documentary explores the roadblocks that stand in the way of stamping out the disease, namely fundamental misconceptions about HIV/AIDS among the country's poorer sects. It also looks at the challenges of treating such a large-scale pandemic. HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa has been a prominent issue this year, thanks to high profile work done by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Bono and others. This documentary presents an in-depth look at treating the disease on the ground level. - - - - - Note: Shortly after the documentary was finished, the South African government revised its official position on HIV/AIDS, and now unequivocally views HIV as the cause of AIDS. It also now says that antiretroviral medication needs to be the focal point of treatment efforts. Health Minister Manto Tshabalala-Msimang and her herbal remedies have been marginalized.


Half-Hour (24:00-30:00)

The Green Planet Monitor - Edition # 11

From David Kattenburg | Part of the The Green Planet Monitor -- Smart Solutions for a Developing World series | 30:00

What is health, anyway? The absence of illness, for sure. It’s also the result of having a home, being safe, fed and loved. Fran Lenhardt of Newmarket, Ontario rediscovered this simple truth while visiting HIV/AIDS orphans in a town in the Kenyan Rift Valley, three hours outside of Nairobi, in east Africa.

Children_and_yankuba_bojang_ham_it_small What is health, anyway? … the absence of illness, for sure …. It’s also the result of having a home, being safe, fed and loved. Fran Lenhardt – of Newmarket Ontario – rediscovered this simple truth while visiting HIV-AIDS orphans in a town in the Kenyan Rift Valley, three and a half hours out of Nairobi, in east Africa. Back from her trip, Lenhardt now devotes all her spare time fundraising for the home and its 74 young residents. GPM producer Victoria Fenner brings us the story.

Thinking about the diseases that afflict humans the most … malaria actually kills more people than HIV. Upwards of a million die each year from the protozoal infection – mostly infants, small children and pregnant women. Awash Teklehaimanot is an Ethiopian with a long-time interest in this scourge. He worked for years with the World Health Organization’s Roll Back Malaria program, helping to coordinate malaria control work in sub-Saharan Africa, where the disease is most prevalent. In 2000, he joined old colleague Jeffrey Sachs at Columbia University’s Earth Institute, teaching malaria epidemiology and helping to tackle the United Nations Millenium Development Goals regarding the Big Three: tuberculosis, malaria and HIV. GPM producer Dave Kattenburg spoke with Professor Awash Teklehaimanot in his office at Columbia University, in upper Manhattan.

And on the topic of malaria … Knowledge and a few practical measures can go a long way towards reducing the prevalence of this killer disease. An education group in the tiny west African nation of Gambia is promoting malaria awareness – aided by a few Nova Scotians. GPM producer Norma Jean MacPhee has more.

Steve Moore: Tears of a Clown

From Charles McGuigan | Part of the A Grain of Sand series | 28:41

AIDS survivor Steve Moore was one of the first comedians in the international limelight to bring laughter to this devastating illness.

Stevemoore_104ma24735665-0001_small Steve was born in Danville, Virginia to Skeets and Wilma, both factory workers. Steve was gay in a community that had trouble accepting his orientation. Again and again he was surprised by the love of his parents and brother Dale. Skeets and Wilma even began to challenge their own Southern Baptsit beliefs. Steve studied theatre, pursued acting in New York then headed out to L.A. where he became a comedian. Just as his career was blossoming, Steve was diagnosed with HIV. His world came to a stand still and he moved back to Virginia where he rented a travel trailer on a mountain lake. He hatched out a plan that would propel into the international limelight.

Bridget Ramasodi (South Africa's Promise)

From My Lens Media | 29:24

Bridgette had to leave her home, South Africa in 1991, during one of the most dynamic periods in that nation’s history. She left just one year after Nelson Mandela was released from political captivity — a time when people around the world were optimistic about that nation’s multi-racial political future. She tells 'Home, from Home' why she left, and how she maintains ties with her homeland by helping women and children in South Africa affected by HIV and AIDS.

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“When you think of South Africa, most people think of Mandela, Miriam Makeba, Hugh Masekela, all the wonderful artists in our political history. Specifically of Mandela. But behind that, was the struggle of day to day existence.”

Those are the words of Bridgette Ramasodi, a South African living in Los Angeles. Bridgette left South Africa in 1991, during one of the most dynamic periods in that nation’s history. It was the year after Nelson Mandela was released from political captivity — a time when people around the world were optimistic about that nation’s multi-racial political future. Today, Bridgette maintains strong ties with her homeland. Through her organization, Advantage Foundation, she helps women and children in South Africa affected by HIV and AIDS.

Click on the show link to find out more about her extraordinary story, how she has adapted to life in the United States, and her advocacy for women and children in South Africa.

HfH Song of the Month: “Everything (…Is Never Quite Enough)” by Wasis Diop. Bridgette says this song reminded her that no amount of money can make you happy. Bridgette says, “happiness is a decision that I have to make.”

WVR - Show 355 (Half Hour) - AIDS in Damascus and China

From World Vision Report | Part of the World Vision Report - Weekly Half Hour series | 28:00

Two clerics in Syria -- one Muslim, one Christian -- talk openly about a subject rarely discussed in public -- HIV-AIDS. They’re working to change attitudes toward the disease so people will seek detection and treatment.
This week the World Vision Report also takes you to China where authorities only recently admitted that AIDS was the leading cause of death there.
Those stories, tribal radio in Pakistan and the simple pleasures of a Saturday night in Cuba.
It’s all coming up this week on the World Vision Report.

Wvus_podcast_logo_300x300-upd-font_small 0:00 - Billboard
0:29 - Harapas
6:04 - Ling Ling
12:27 - Tribal Voices
17:08 - Success Without Aid
23:43 - Saturday Night
28:00 - End

World Vision Report - Show 288 (Half Hour)

From World Vision Report | 28:00

It’s an unusual alliance in Syria -- a Catholic priest and a Muslim cleric working together to spread the word about HIV-AIDS. That’s because the disease is growing in that region by 300% a year.

Wv_podcast_icon_sm_small



Full Show

0:00 - Billboard
0:57 - Harpas
6:19 - Ling Ling
12:44 - Knife Sharpener
16:38 - Wedding
19:56 - Hartbeat
25:02 - Displaced Farm Workers
27:38 - Credits and Music
28:00 - End


Segments (9:00-23:59)

There were ghosts everywhere: AIDS in Provincetown

From Sarah Yahm | 12:13

An oral history of AIDS in Provincetown Massachusetts

Provincetowneastend_small From Memorial Day to Labor Day Provincetown Massachusetts is one of the world's largest and most well known gay vacation meccas.  This small fishing village is festooned with pride flags, drag queens, and gay couples of all ages holding hands and ice cream cones.  But in the late 80's and 90's, while the party continued, 10 percent of Provincetown's year round population was dying of AIDS. And most of the remaining 90 percent were tending to them. This piece is about what it was like to live and die in this small town in the midst of this epidemic and the surreal mix of celebration and devastation.  

An Interview with Zackie Achmat: A World AIDS Day Special Report

From The Stanley Foundation | 11:40

South Africa has some of the highest HIV/AIDS infections rates in the world. And the country's ruling party, the African National Congress, and former President Thabo Mbeki spent years denying a connection between HIV and AIDS. But South Africa also has Zackie Achmat, a world renowned activist who has mobilized thousands of volunteers from America and elsewhere in the fight against AIDS.

Zackieachmatprx_small South Africa has some of the highest HIV/AIDS infections rates in the world. And the country's ruling party, the African National Congress, and former President Thabo Mbeki spent years denying a connection between HIV and AIDS. But South Africa also has Zackie Achmat, a world renowned activist who has mobilized thousands of volunteers from America and elsewhere in the fight against AIDS. Correspondent Kristin McHugh recently sat down with Achmat in his home for a candid discussion on the struggle against AIDS in South Africa and his own personal battle with the disease.


Cutaways (5:00-8:59)

We Are Still Here: Voices of HIV+ Youth

From Julia Applegate | 05:52

A audio collage of voices of HIV-positive youth.

Groupphoto_small The Ohio AIDS Coalition held its first Positive Leadership Summit for HIV+young adults in January of 2007. The three day Summit brought together participants from counties throughout Ohio to begin a much needed dialogue about living with HIV as a young adult. Workshop and group discussions centered on stigma, treatment, and the barriers preventing young positive Ohioans from taking their first steps towards becoming leaders in the AIDS epidemic. Tyler TerMeer, Director of Programming for the Ohio AIDS Coalition said, "When I learned I was HIV positive at the age of 21, I needed more than anything to have a social support system of peers who truly understood what I was going through. In developing this Summit, it was my hope that we would provide an atmosphere that was safe and confidential from the outside world. It took great courage for these young adults to travel across the state, but it takes immense bravery to return to a community confident, educated, and empowered." This audio piece was compiled from interviews with Summit participants.

We Are Strong Women

From Julia Applegate | 05:24

An audio collage of voices of HIV-positive women in the United States.

Default-piece-image-2 Excerpts from HIV+ Women from all over Ohio. Audio clips from different women are arranged to explore themes common to HIV+ women. In the end the stories of seven become the story of one, and in turn reflect common experiences of HIV+ women in the United States.


Drop-Ins (2:00-4:59)

That's My Song: Under Pressure

From outLoud Radio at Youth Radio | Part of the That's My Song series | 04:04

One boy's bittersweet association with a David Bowie song.

Uprahenhancedcd_small Max Hsing, a high-schooler from San Francisco, tells the story of an uncle who died of AIDS, and why the song "Under Pressure" (by David Bowie and Queen) reminds him to "give love one more chance." September 5: Freddy Mercury's birthday (lead singer of Queen) December 1: World AIDS Day

Brandon and His Meds

From Jamie Courville | 02:58

After living with HIV for many years, Brandon recently had to start taking medication. He has advice for those who are in the same boat.

Dsc_5567_small After living with HIV for many years, Brandon recently had to start taking medication. He has advice for those who are in the same boat. Brandon passed away November 9, 2012.

The Silent AIDS Epidemic in Bolivia

From Ruxandra Guidi | 03:41

The South American country of Bolivia has the lowest HIV/AIDS prevalence in the region. But its mix of tradition and cultural diversity are proving to be major challenges when it comes to fighting AIDS there.

Sida08-04-07_small Bolivia has the lowest HIV/AIDS prevalence in the region — even though the epidemic is growing rapidly. The country faced its AIDS problem later than many of its neighbors, including Brazil. Only in the last three years, has the Bolivian government made a concerted effort to educate the public about the disease, and provide free AIDS drugs who those who need it. But Bolivia’s mix of tradition and cultural diversity are proving to be major challenges when it comes to fighting AIDS there.

Losing a Friend to AIDS

From Youth Radio | 01:57

Hearing that her friend has had unprotected sex with an HIV-positive person leads Youth Radio’s Leah Chapple-Stingley to reflect on another time and place.

Default-piece-image-0 Hearing that her friend has had unprotected sex with an HIV-positive person leads Youth Radio’s Leah Chapple-Stingley to reflect on another time and place. Thinking back to her family friend she, “can’t forget the anger, the confusion. To watch a man in his early thirties die of pneumonia, because his immune system couldn’t fight back.” (Aired locally in SF Bay Area)

"Baby Girl" by Jeffery Lewis

From WBEZ | Part of the Louder Than a Bomb 2005 series | 03:00

Chicago teen Jeffery Lewis speaks powerfully about the impact of HIV/AIDS.

Ltablogo_small Louder Than a Bomb brings you the 2005 finalists from this nationally-renowned teen poetry slam, hosted by Young Chicago Authors. Featuring remarkable work about identity, race relations, gun violence, police brutality, relationships with parents, God, Islam, cancer, HIV/AIDS, and gentrification these young writers hold very little back. Each piece included in the series is a titled performance piece. Without introduction, a template for host-introduction is offered here (under additional materials). These pieces would work well aired independently or as a series in locally produced programming that is looking to add a youth perspective. This is debut series. The Young Chicago Authors - Louder Than a Bomb teen poetry slam is now in it’s fifth year, bringing poets ages 13-19 years-old together in a safe space that emphasizes community building, education, and youth empowerment. By carrying on the rich tradition of oral storytelling and the spoken word, the 2005 Louder Than a Bomb teen poetry slam engaged over 400 youth participants representing over 30 schools and community organizations. The eight teams that were invited to the final round, each presenting one group piece and two individual pieces, are presented here. Louder Than a Bomb is produced by Breeze Luetke-Stahlman and distributed directly to public radio stations through PRX.