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Playlist: Laura Stoehr's Portfolio

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Natural Selections (Series)

Produced by North Country Public Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

Why do cats like to hang out in boxes?

From North Country Public Radio | Part of the Natural Selections series | 04:38

Natselect_small Of all the places a cat can hang out, why do do many of them want to hang out in boxes? According to researchers, cats that spend time in close confines are measurably less stressed than those remaining in the open. As Curt Stager tells Martha Foley, it's not just house cats who feel this way.

Sign of Science (Series)

Produced by Finger Lakes Productions

Most recent piece in this series:

Sign of Science July 2 - 6, 2012

From Finger Lakes Productions | Part of the Sign of Science series | 07:30

Sos_copy_small A 90-second daily feature produced by Finger Lakes Productions, Sign of Science focuses on all areas of science and how it impacts our daily lives.  Many segments include the words of an expert in the field. Currently heard daily around the world on radio networks and stations as well as a podcast, the show is free to stations: contact info@flpradio.com for more registration information. This week's pieces are:

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Mon., 7/2-Bacteria in ice: Bacteria frozen in Antarctic ice for hundreds of years show signs of life when thawed.  

 

Tue., 7/3-No photosynthesis: Most basic life on earth relies on photosynthesis to survive, but sunlight doesn’t reach a freshwater lake beneath two miles of ice. 

 

Wed., 7/4-This internship isn’t for everyone: An undergraduate student was intrigued with a posting for an internship in Antarctica. 

           

Thu., 7/5-Cold-weather camping:  A five-week camping trip in one of the coldest places on earth may not be what most people have in mind when they hear “cold-weather camping.”   

 

Fri., 7/6-Penguin census: Scientists at the University of Minnesota used satellite imagery to get an accurate count of penguins in Antarctica. 

Our Ocean World (Series)

Produced by Finger Lakes Productions

Most recent piece in this series:

Our Ocean World July 2 - July 6, 2012

From Finger Lakes Productions | Part of the Our Ocean World series | 07:30

Owlogo_web_small Our Ocean World is a 90-second daily feature produced by Finger Lakes Productions, highlighting the wonders of, and issues confronting, our oceans. Each piece includes the words of an expert in the field. Currently heard daily around the world on radio networks and stations as well as a podcast, the show is free to stations: contact info@flpradio.com for more registration information. This week's pieces are:

Mon., 7/2-Tagging Weddell seals:
The large size and diving habits of these seals make them ideas for collecting data. 

           

Tues., 7/3-Whale song: Whales from different oceans sing different songs.  But while migrating, one group of whale immigrants gave singing lessons and the resident whales changed their tunes.

 

Wed., 7/4-Coral sunscreen: Corals need warm water and sunlight.  But since too much sunlight can be deadly, corals have a natural sunscreen.

 

Thurs., 7/5-Long line fishing: Sea birds are being wiped out by the practice of running thousands of baited hooks along miles of line in the open sea.

 

Fri., 7/6-Arctic char: Arctic char live most of their lives in freshwater streams, leaving only to feed in the ocean.

The Phenology Show (Series)

Produced by Northern Community Radio - KAXE & KBXE

Most recent piece in this series:

Phenology Plus -5-31-2011

From Northern Community Radio - KAXE & KBXE | Part of the The Phenology Show series | 54:23

Phenology_medium_medium_small John Latimer's weekly discussion on the rhythmic fluctuations in nature.

NatureWatch (Series)

Produced by Finger Lakes Productions

Most recent piece in this series:

NatureWatch July 2 - 6, 2012

From Finger Lakes Productions | Part of the NatureWatch series | 07:30

Nwlogo_prx_small A proven audience pleaser, NatureWatch features a creative mix of engaging story telling and pristine natural sounds. This sound-rich series showcases the calls of hundreds of birds and animals, giving listeners an insight into the natural world around them. This week's pieces are:

Mon., July 2- Fire(fly) Works:  Take a break from the fireworks this holiday weekend to watch the lightshow put on by fireflies.

 

Tues., July 3-Chimney Swift: Checked your chimney lately?  You may be unwittingly sheltering a family or two—up the flue.

 

Wed., July 4- Don’t Feed the Animals: We see the signs prominently displayed in park areas across North America:  “Please don’t feed the animals.”  There's good reason.

                         

Thurs., July 5-Sidewinder: The sidewinder makes its home in the Mojave and Sonoran deserts of the American Southwest.

 

Fri., July 6-Birds and Baseball:  People aren’t the only ones who like to attend an evening baseball game.

Radio Ecoshock Show (Series)

Produced by Alex Smith

Most recent piece in this series:

Dark Conspiracies of the Gulf

From Alex Smith | Part of the Radio Ecoshock Show series | 53:00

Jack_alpert_small Around the camp fire, humans tell horror stories. About goblins, and dark conspiracies of death. Soon after the shock of the BP Oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, the cranks rolled out new tales that tell us a lot about the human mind, and how we react to environmental tragedy.

While the deadly rig explosion, the oiled wild-life, and the lost jobs are no joke, I can't resist rating the wildest theories, coming from non-existent mystics, far-out blogs, right-wing radio, and even mainstream TV.

Radio Ecoshock rates the conspiracies that strain the mind - plus a few strange facts that may be too true.

Then a rare radio interview with Dr. Jack Alpert. He helped bring us seat belts, was a corporate trainer in Silicon Valley, and founded his own research institute at Stanford.

Jack calls for radical population reduction. He explains why consumption could lead to more terrorism, and wonders if we are heading into a more violent age, as resources run out.

Most importantly, Jack Alpert discovered a type of blindness in the human brain - something even the brightest people can't compute. This may explain why we don't tackle problems like Peak Oil or climate change. A dynamic interview on key problems, including how to avoid a damaged future. In fact, Alpert says we can all have more "stuff" - if we think it through and act.

Longer transcript with links here:
http://www.ecoshock.org/transcripts/ES_100618_Script.htm

May 2010 - Isla Earth Radio Series (Series)

Produced by Catalina Island Conservancy

Most recent piece in this series:

Better Wind Turbines

From Catalina Island Conservancy | Part of the May 2010 - Isla Earth Radio Series series | 01:30

Isla_earth_inlay With wind turbine blades approaching 90 feet in length whipping around at 150 miles an hour, they’ve been called everything from “raptor-matics” to “cuisinarts of the sky.” But considering all the good windmills do for our environment by providing clean, renewable energy, is the cost in bird deaths worth the price?

North Woods Phenology (Series)

Produced by WTIP

Most recent piece in this series:

Early March observations

From WTIP | Part of the North Woods Phenology series | 05:44

Photo2_small This time of the year is the beginning of the transition from winter to spring. There's lots of activity starting up in the woods, but there's still cold weather and snow. Naturalist Chel Anderson shares some of her recent observations in this edition of North Woods Phenology.

The EnvironMinute (Series)

Produced by Finger Lakes Productions

Most recent piece in this series:

The EnvironMinute July 2 - 6, 2012

From Finger Lakes Productions | Part of the The EnvironMinute series | 05:00

Emlogo_web_small The EnvironMinute is FLPI's longest-running feature and provides your listeners with tips to reduce their impact on the environment, clues for environmentally-responsible consumption, and how to know when something is truly "green."  For more information contact info [at] flpradio.com. This week's pieces are:

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Mon., Jul. 2-A Financial Reason to Invest in Eco-Friendly Technologies:  Green technologies aren’t always too expensive for use in the developing world – often, the long-term expense is less than existing alternatives.

 

Tues., Jul. 3-Resolving the Potable Water Issue: How can environmental entrepreneurs help bring potable water to the developing world?

 

Wed., Jul. 4-Tracking Fish: By learning about the movements of ocean creatures, we can help keep fisheries sustainable.

 

Thurs., Jul. 5-Bats Could Help Restore Rainforest: Scientists working on rainforest restoration are recruiting the help of some unusual farmers.

 

Fri., Jul. 6-Manure Products: Researchers have found a new use for the sterile fiber generated by methane digesters.

Moth Radio Hour Spring 2010 Season (Series)

Produced by The Moth

Most recent piece in this series: