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Playlist: 2018 Possible New Programs

Compiled By: KRPS

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The Pulse (Series)

Produced by WHYY

Most recent piece in this series:

329: Mental Health in Times of Crisis, 4/3/2020

From WHYY | Part of the The Pulse series | 58:59

3000x3000_itunes_thepulse_1_small The COVID-19 outbreak is creating increased demand for mental health services — lots of people are feeling anxious, or are getting depressed. At the same time, traditional mental health services have been disrupted. In-person sessions are not possible at the moment, nor are group sessions. How are providers and their clients adjusting? We take a look at mental health services and what people are doing to stay well during these difficult times. We also hear stories of families affected by serious mental health issues, and why they say the system fails too many people.

Climate One (Series)

Produced by Climate One

Most recent piece in this series:

2020-04-03 COVID-19 and Climate: Human Response

From Climate One | Part of the Climate One series | 58:59

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Guests: 
Peter Atwater, Adjunct Professor of Economics, College of William & Mary
Susan Clayton, Whitmore-Williams Professor of Psychology, College of Wooster
Robert H. Frank, Henrietta Johnson Louis Professor of Management, Cornell SC Johnson College of Business

Additional interviews:
Shannon Osaka, Climate Reporter, Grist

This program was recorded at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on March 24, 2020, 

How do human beings respond to invisible threats like the coronavirus and carbon pollution? One threat is personal, direct, and close – touch an infected surface or talk too close to someone and you could be deathly sick in a matter of days. The other is impersonal, indirect, and far away– driving your car contributes in some tiny way to future melting glaciers, rising seas, and scorching heat waves. And yet responding to both requires a similar shift in mindset and behavior.

The idea that we need some way to restrain what we ourselves do individually to secure a better outcome for the collective, for us generally, is a deep similarity between the two cases,” says Robert Frank, Professor of Management at the Cornell School of Business. “What's expeditious for an individual to do is often just a horrible thing for the community if people do it.”

As the world reacts to the novel coronavirus by demanding individual action for the collective good, some are asking when the climate threat will inspire similar action.

”Disease is a lot more immediate, a lot more scary than the idea that were gradually destroying or harming the atmosphere and the ecosystem,” says Susan Clayton, Professor of Psychology at the College of Wooster. She further notes how the public messaging about the coronavirus amplifies this impression.

“We don't have a lot of people who are very prominent talking about how scary climate change is. But we do have a lot of people talking about how scary COVID-19 is.”

The pandemic has dominated and changed the conversation about everything – including climate.

“Even just a few weeks ago a few months ago you saw this extraordinary energy around climate change that I'm worrying now has been evaporated,” says Peter Atwater, who teaches Economics at the College of William & Mary, “because we've gone from an us, everywhere, forever mindset to a me, here, now, mindset.”

A Way with Words (Series)

Produced by A Way with Words

Most recent piece in this series:

Singing Sand (#1546)

From A Way with Words | Part of the A Way with Words series | 54:00

6333325441_0da863a31f_w_small Paternoster lakes are circular lakes formed in a series along a valley, also known as a glacial stairway. From above, paternoster lakes resemble rosary beads on a string. Paternoster is another word for "rosary," deriving from the Latin pater noster, or "Our Father," the two words that usually begin the rosary prayer. The term paternoster lakes is one of hundreds of terms about the natural world described in Homeground: A Guide to the American Landscape, edited by Barry Lopez and Debra Gwartney.


Matt from Waukesha, Wisconsin, has been discussing the words barely and nearly with his 10-year-old son Simon. They know the two words are nearly alike, but how exactly?


Jacob in Dallas, Texas, remembers his grandfather used to talk about someone having a come apart, meaning "having a breakdown" or "freaking out." It's not a common phrase, but it's widespread enough that it appears in newspaper archives at least as far back as the 1980s to refer to "losing one's cool" or "falling to pieces."


Lucy, a middle-school student in San Diego, California, is puzzled by a phrase her mother uses when something is not quite up to snuff or falls short of the mark: close, but no tomato. It appears to be a variant of close, but no cigar, a phrase adopted from the patter of old-time carnival barkers.


Quiz Guy John Chaneski's puzzle is about common bonds that connect three things. For example, what's the one word that links the following trio of terms? A report card, USDA inspected beef, and an incline.


Cark is a noun meaning "worry" or "trouble." As a verb, cark means "to cause worry or distress," as in to have carking doubts. This word derives from a Latin word for "burden," which also produced charge, as in a "load" to carry, and car, a vehicle that carries.


An editor with a large database company is tussling with colleagues over the proper use of the words comprise and composed of. She believes the correct usage would be: The alphabet comprises 26 letters or The alphabet is composed of 26 letters. She's right. The use of the phrase is comprised of is widespread, even though it's traditionally considered incorrect. When possible, it's best to find an alternative entirely, such as consists of.


Singing sand refers to the roaring noise or boom produced by vibrations in sand dunes. Barking sand, which makes yipping noises when you drag your feet along it, is found along coastlines in Hawaii and elsewhere. These terms are discussed in more detail in Homeground: A Guide to the American Landscape, edited by Barry Lopez and Debra Gwartney.


When Therese moved from New England to Petersburg, Alaska, she heard a rich mixture of language that arose from the Tlingit people who live there part of the year, the Norwegians who immigrated there, and a thriving fishing industry. So you might hear residents borrowing the fishing term to be corked, that is "to be interfered with," or referring to the Norwegian Christmastime practice of going julebukking, or wandering business to business, enjoying Norwegian food and perhaps an adult beverage along the way. Speech arising from such a mixture of languages is called contact language. Trade language arises when parts of languages combine specifically for use in trade. A pidgin develops as the result of two or more languages combining grammatical and lexical features that develops into something still more sophisticated, with syntactical rules and vocabulary that are passed on from parents to children, sometimes over many generations. 


If you're happy as a boardinghouse pup, you're elated indeed. Food in a boardinghouse can't compare with home-cooked meals, which works to the advantage of a canine waiting around to be tossed some scraps.


Isabel Wilkerson's magnificent history, The Warmth of Other Suns, chronicles the Great Migration of American blacks from the Southern United States starting in the era of Jim Crow. In it, Wilkerson quotes someone who says of another person: You must be smelling yourself. This saying describes someone "conceited" or otherwise full of himself.


Andres from San Diego, California, wonders: Why do we refer to jail as the pokey? The term, along with its variant pogie, likely goes back to a word for workhouse, a prison where people worked as part of their sentence, much like debtors' prison.


The slang term kittenball is used in parts of the American Midwest for the sport of softball. According to The Dickson Baseball Dictionary, a fire company Minneapolis, Minnesota, first applied the term kittenball to softball, and called its first team the Kittens.


Omar in Wilmington, North Carolina, says that when he was growing up in Pakistan, he and fellow cricket players referred to their team captain as the skipper. The term skipper, or skip, originated in seafaring terminology and now applies to the leader of various types of teams, such as curling or cycling.
 
According to Homeground: A Guide to the American Landscape, edited by Barry Lopez and Debra Gwartney, the Navajo term tsegi means "rock canyon." This term was adapted into French as the name for the spectacular spot in Arizona known as Canyon de Chelly.


Jason from De Pere, Wisconsin, was surprised to see that among the spelling words his twin second-graders were studying was the contraction this'll. Is a term like this'll really appropriate for a second-grade spelling test?


The Latin word latibulum means a "refuge or hiding place of animals." It derives from the same root that gives us the English word latent, meaning "hidden." A 17th-century dictionary defines the now-rare English word latibulate as "privily to hide oneself in a corner."


This episode is hosted by Grant Barrett and Martha Barnette.

Music 101 (Series)

Produced by KUNC & The Colorado Sound

Most recent piece in this series:

Mx101 Ep90: Rock Meets Classical, 4/2/2020

From KUNC & The Colorado Sound | Part of the Music 101 series | 57:00

Music_101_recent_small Did you know that a lot of rock songs actually have their basis in classical music melodies? That's what we'll explore this week on Music 101.

Ozark Highlands Radio (Series)

Produced by Ozark Highlands Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

OHR113: OHR Presents: JT Trawick, 4/13/2020

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Jt_trawick_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s historic 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Portland, Oregon based singer-songwriter, square dance enthusiast, and Ozark original JT Trawick of the famed folk music family the Trawicks, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas.  Also, interviews with JT.  JT is joined in this performance by champion fiddler Alex Sharps and bassist & multi-instrumentalist Bill Nesbitt.

Being of the legendary Trawick folk music family of the Ozarks, JT Trawick grew up immersed in traditional music.  Specializing in guitar, vocals and mandolin, JT has performed and worked with some of the premier musicians of our generation.  Two-time Grand North American Fiddle Champion - Calvin Vollrath, seven-time World Champion Fiddler - Jim "Texas Shorty" Chancellor, National Flatpick Champion - Tyler Grant, world famous mandolinist - Evan Marshall, Grand National Champion - Dale Morris Jr., three-time Grand Master Fiddle Champion - Matthew Hartz, Canadian Fiddle Queen - April Verch, and World Champion Fiddler - Ricky Boen are just a few of the artists Jonathan has worked with.

While calling Portland, Oregon his home base, JT Trawick remains involved with Fiddlin Arkansas, the Arkansas fiddle community outreach he started in 2010.  Today, the organization remains a lighthouse for all things Arkansas fiddle.  Continuing in the footsteps of his musical heroes, JT delivers authentic American roots music, traditional and original western swing, bluegrass and classic country to the people everywhere he goes. - https://www.jttrawick.com 

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1981 archival recording of legendary Ozark balladeer Almeda Riddle, performing the traditional tune “From Jerusalem to Jericho,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.  In this rare recording, Almeda, who normally performs a cappella, is accompanied by guitarist Jim Lansford.

Author, folklorist and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  In this episode, Charley speaks with members of a nomadic recreational vehicle community on the question “What’s Worth Keeping” from our past in the rapidly evolving culture of our present.

Earth Eats (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

EE 20-14: School Lunches When Schools Are Closed, 4/3/2020

From WFIU | Part of the Earth Eats series | 29:00

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This week on our show we talk with Hattie Johnson from our local school district’s Nutrition Services, about providing take-out lunches during the school building closures. 

And, I’ve got a simple meal idea to last your household a couple of days in quarantine. 


Folk Alley Weekly (Series)

Produced by WKSU

Most recent piece in this series:

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio (Series)

Produced by Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

314: The Greek Makeover: Diane Kochilas Freshens Up Greek Cooking, 4/2/2020

From Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio | Part of the Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio series | 53:56

Msl_radio_logo_cobrand_prx_small Chef Diane Kochilas talks real Greek yogurt, how to make great dishes with stale bread and the magical Greek island of Ikaria. Plus, we explore the art and nostalgia of Jell-O molds; we present a fresh new take on Spaghetti Puttanesca; and Dan Pashman untangles the legal definition of a sandwich.
(Originally aired May 9, 2019. Available for rerun April 2-9, 2020.) 

Reveal Weekly (Series)

Produced by Reveal

Most recent piece in this series:

614: Essential Workers, 4/4/2020

From Reveal | Part of the Reveal Weekly series | :00

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With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes (Series)

Produced by With Good Reason

Most recent piece in this series:

Music Matters (half)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 29:00

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We all know that teenagers would rather die than hang out with their parents, right? Not so, says Jon Lohman. The Old Fiddlers Convention in Galax, Virginia, brings young and old together to share traditions and songs. But how are musicians faring now, during the coronavirus crisis? Plus: The studio comes alive with song when Steve Rockenbach and Gregg Kimball bring their banjos in to share the instrument’s storied history in America. They reflect on how the banjo’s transformation has affected song styles to this day. 


Later in the show: When the first settlers came to America from England and Scotland they brought with them a rich tradition of ballad-singing. Cece Conway traces the singing families and their songs from the UK to the Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina, where they influenced modern performers from Joan Baez to the Carolina Chocolate Drops.


Are We Alone?

From Philosophy Talk | Part of the Philosophy Talk series | 53:59

If there is intelligent life beyond Earth, how would that change life ON Earth?

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News that life might exist or have existed on Mars or somewhere else in our universe excites many. But should we really be happy to hear that news? What are the philosophical implications of the possibility of extraterrestrial life? If life can blossom in our own cosmic backyard, then that means that the universe is most likely saturated with life forms. And if that’s the case, why haven’t we found any evidence of other civilizations? Is it because all civilizations are prone to suicidal destruction at a certain point in their development? If so, how might we avoid this fate? The Philosophers search for life with Paul Davies from Arizona State University, author of The Eerie Silence: Renewing Our Search for Alien Intelligence.

Planetary Radio (Series)

Produced by Mat Kaplan

Most recent piece in this series:

The Next 10 Years: Continuing our Solar System Tour

From Mat Kaplan | Part of the Planetary Radio series | 28:50

Lucy_artist_concept_nasa_small_small Our survey of the solar system in anticipation of the next planetary science decadal survey continues with Mars, the big outer planets, and the smaller bodies that share the neighborhood. Three more great scientists share their looks ahead. Staying responsibly stuck at home is easier when you can look up at a gorgeous night sky. Bruce Betts is here to help with another fun edition of What’s Up and a Random Space Fact or two.  There’s much more of Bruce and our guests, along with links for further exploration,  at  https://www.planetary.org/multimedia/planetary-radio/show/2020/0401-2020-next-10-years-part-2.html

Living Planet 05/04/2018

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

LLiving Planet: Walk the Walk -

On the show this week: Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

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Living Planet: Walk the Walk

 

Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

 

 

Katowice: A coal town that wants to go green

 

The upcoming COP24 climate summit will be held in Katowice, deep in Poland's industrial and coal mining heartland. Its air quality is among the worst in Europe. But the town is trying to clean up its act. And if Katowice can go green, perhaps anywhere can.

 

Canada's First Nations vs. tar sands pipeline

 

Canadian President Justin Trudeau has been vocal about his commitment to climate protection. But now, he's coming to blows with environmentalists and the provincial government of British Columbia over a massive oil pipeline

Can reflective roads help LA keep its cool?

Los Angeles has the greatest density of cars in the US — and a massive network of roads. In summer the asphalt absorbs sunlight and heats up, warming the air above it, an effect that will be exacerbated by climate change. But cool paving could change all that.

 

 

Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

Living Planet 03/27/2020

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

Lp1_small This week on the show: A rare breed - We hear stories about different species in the animal kingdom: nutria, pangolins, the golden lancehead pit viper. According to the United Nations, one million animal and plant species are threatened with extinction, many within the coming decades. But as famed primatologist and conservation advocate Jane Goodall explains, animals aren't so different from us humans.

Tara Austin

From KUMD | Part of the Radio Gallery series | 04:40

This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm.

An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

Playing
Tara Austin
From
KUMD

Tara_austin_5_small This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm. An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

ClassicalWorks (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

CLW 200405 11PM: ClassicalWorks (Episode 271), 4/5/2020 11:00 PM

From WFIU | Part of the ClassicalWorks series | 58:56

Classicalworks_logo_-_luann_johnson_small ClassicalWorks (Episode 271)

Jazz with David Basse (Series)

Produced by Jazz with David Basse, LLC.

Most recent piece in this series:

1564.3: Jazz with David Basse 1564.3, 4/3/2020 2:00 AM

From Jazz with David Basse, LLC. | Part of the Jazz with David Basse series | 59:53

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1564.3 Ray Charles sets the stage with two, A Fool for You / Crying Time. With this, we have set a high bar & given room for anyone, if good, to try anything. I lead with Alex Wintz, the guitarist’s Locust Avenue is superb followed by the King of the tenor saxophone, James Carter, taking us to church with Duke’s Come Sunday. Off to Pittsburgh, steel town of musicians with steel chops. Leechburg Road, the song, and Chicken on the Hill with Will, the album, are obviously inside messages to those who know. Drummer, Louis Hayes, plays Silver, Kenny Garrett, plays in French, Jocelyn Medina, Slows it Down and  Melody Gardot, tells us about The King of 52nd Street. Leading us all to want to, Get Out of Town, with Champian Fulton. Jazz with David Basse 1684.3

Open Source with Christopher Lydon (Series)

Produced by Open Source

Most recent piece in this series:

Profits or People

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source with Christopher Lydon series | 59:00

Finlogo_small Week 4 was when dollar signs kept turning up, and up, astonishingly: price-tags on the virus’s damage, price-tags on fighting it. The bailout of bailouts came in at $2.2 trillion of disaster relief and, it’s fair to say, a pipeline of money to Wall Street, to the Boeing Company, and the airline industry.  Who’d have expected Republican conservatives would bail out people, too: “four-figure checks” in mailboxes within three weeks, Mitch McConnell promised. The mantra is official now: don’t sweat the debt. Governor Cuomo in the virus’s bullseye of New York sounded desperate for hospital beds, but he also thought the spiky curve of cases was flattening.  

For an immeasurable public health disaster, Washington has come up with unheard of relief, about double what the federal government budgets for all spending in a whole year.  And the case loads and death toll of the coronavirus keep rising, unevenly, unpredictably, and by far the worst in New York, city and state. Mark Blyth is our almost reflexive call: our political economist at Brown University, eagle-eyed and irreverent on those places where money and power mix and mingle and make rules for the world. He can sound like the noisiest know-it-all in a Glasgow pub, but people always say he has a gift for making sense where they hadn’t seen it.  

Blue Dimensions (Series)

Produced by Bluesnet Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

Blue Dimensions I14: Three Songs from the trio Gilfema's album "Three"

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

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In this hour of Blue Dimensions, colorful and melodic new music from the album "Three" from the trio Gilfema, guitarist Lionel Loueke, bassist Massimo Biolcati, and drummer Ferenc Nemeth. These three players have worked together for much of this century, since meeting each other at Berklee College Of Music. They have worked as  the Lionel Loueke Trio and as Gilfema; the last album release as Gilfema was in 2008.  Also: saxophonist/flutist/clarinetist Jimmy Greene has a new album called "While Looking Up" - - and we'll look up with him. Robby Krieger, who was the guitarist of the Doors and is a co-writer of "Light My Fire", has a new album called "The Ritual Begins At Sundown," and we'll share a couple of great tunes from it. Plus, music from saxophonist Benjamin Boone recorded in Ghana where he was studying music on a Fulbright scholarship, with a group now called The Ghana Jazz Collective.

promo included: promo-I14

Blue Dimensions G43: A Trinity Of "Presence"

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Three recent albums all entitled "Presence," from Orrin Evans & The Captain Black Big Band, John Petrucelli, and Brad Whitely.

Evans_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, we are surprised to note that three jazz albums entitled "Presence" have come out in 2018, and we've decided to draw music from all three of them - - one from pianist Orrin Evans & The Captain Black Big Band, some high-energy stuff recorded in concert at two jazz clubs in Philadelphia, one from pianist Brad Whitely, a strong studio recording, and another live one, a double album from saxophonist and composer John Petrucelli with lots of strings and a scallop shell used as an instrument as well. Three engaging and very different albums, all called "Presence," coming up in this hour of Blue Dimensions.

promo included: promo-G43

Feminine Fusion (Series)

Produced by WCNY

Most recent piece in this series:

S04 Ep31: Award Winners, 4/4/2020

From WCNY | Part of the Feminine Fusion series | :00

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Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

DWF 19-26: Kissingen Summer, 3/23/2020

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts series | 01:57:56

J_rvi_small We train the microphone on one of today's most exciting conductors and on a brilliant young Russian singer: Paavo Järvi and Julia Lezhneva both perform and share their thoughts on this program from the festival Kissingen Summer.

High Country Celtic Radio (Series)

Produced by High Country Celtic Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

High Country Celtic Radio 105 - Women All-Ireland Winners

From High Country Celtic Radio | Part of the High Country Celtic Radio series | 59:00

High-country-celtic-non-branded-240x240_small Women's History Month is drawing to a close, so we took the opportunity for one more show featuring women artists of Irish and Celtic music. What's special about today's show is that most of these artists were All-Ireland champions in their chosen instrument at the Comhaltas Fleadh. We do sneak in a couple of phenomenal musicians who have not won an All-Ireland title, but they don't have to.

This week, we feature the following powerful women: Louise Mulcahy, Liz Carroll & Jake Charron, Liz & Yvonne Kane, Eimear Arkins, Zoë Conway, Natalie MacMaster, Ursula Byrne, Gráinne Hambly, Mary Bergin, Joanie Madden, Mary Dillon of Déanta, Niamh Parsons & Graham Dunne, and Nuala Hehir with Aoibheann & Pamela Queally.

Our FairPlé score this week: 100

406: Celebrating the Birthday of Bucky Pizzarelli, 1/1/2019

From KCUR | Part of the 12th Street Jump Weekly series | 59:00

(Air Dates: December 31 - January 8) On this week's archive episode of 12th Street Jump, we celebrate the music of Bucky Pizzarelli with Bucky himself and his long time music partner Ed Laub. We'll play a game of "So, What's Your Question" with Ed and talk to Bucky about what gives him the blues.

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Public Radio's weekly jazz, blues and comedy jam, 12th STREET JUMP celebrates America's original art form, live from one of its birthplaces, 12th Street in Kansas City. That is where Basie tickled and ivories and Big Joe Turner shouted the blues. Each week, host Ebony Fondren offers up a lively hour of topical sketch comedy and some great live jazz and blues from the 12th STREET JUMP band (musical director Joe Cartright, along with Tyrone Clark on bass and Arnold Young on drums) and vocalist David Basse. Special guests join the fun every week down at the 12th Street Jump.

Latin Jazz Perspective (T-5)

From Tony Vasquez | Part of the Latin Perspective - Latin Jazz Hour (weekly) series | 59:01

A weekly radio show featuring the best in classic and contemporary Latin Jazz music. Hosted by Tony Vasquez.

Yvettei_small A weekly radio show featuring the best in classic and contemporary Latin Jazz music. Hosted by Tony Vasquez.
This week edition is a special presentation on the Latin Jazz Flute.
Featuring Latin /Latin Jazz flautists from the past and present who where a major force
in the historical continuum of the music.

Notes from the Jazz Underground #44 - Jazz in Chicago, 2019

From WDCB | Part of the Notes from the Jazz Underground series | 58:00

With all of the internationally lauded Jazz coming out of Chicago these days, Notes from the Jazz Underground takes a look - and a listen - to some of the shining stars of the Chicago Jazz scene.

Nftju_logo_small_small With all of the internationally lauded Jazz coming out of Chicago these days, Notes from the Jazz Underground takes a look - and a listen - to some of the shining stars of the Chicago Jazz scene.