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Playlist: 2018 Possible New Programs

Compiled By: KRPS

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The Pulse (Series)

Produced by WHYY

Most recent piece in this series:

343: Do Less Harm, 7/10/2020

From WHYY | Part of the The Pulse series | 58:59

3000x3000_itunes_thepulse_1_small In sharp contrast to abstinence-only education or “Just Say No,” America has been moving toward a public health approach that doesn’t hinge on moral absolutes. It’s called harm reduction, an approach that prioritizes safety, care, and meeting people where they are. The resulting policies can be controversial — from supervised injection sites to needle exchanges, or safe sex education for teenagers — but they can also save lives. On this episode of The Pulse, we trace the growth of harm reduction, from its scrappy roots into its blossoming present. We hear stories about bringing practicality to the fight against COVID-19, lessons learned from Canada’s safe injection sites, and one woman’s mission to get naloxone into the hands of everybody — even those selling drugs.

Climate One (Series)

Produced by Climate One

Most recent piece in this series:

2020-06-12 Will Climate Matter in the Election?

From Climate One | Part of the Climate One series | 58:59

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Guests: 
Vanessa Hauc, Journalist, Telemundo
Jeff Nesbit, Executive Director, Climate Nexus  
Nathaniel Stinnett, Founder and Executive Director, Environmental Voter Project

Additional interviews:
Antony Leiserowitz  Director, Yale Program on Climate Change Communication 
Natasha Kennedy, graphic designer in Seattle

With America in turmoil amid protests and a pandemic, is anyone still thinking about climate in this November’s election?

“There is a climate voter right now,” says Jeff Nesbit, Executive Director of Climate Nexus. “Our polls have shown it, lots of other polls have shown it, even now in the middle of this pandemic and what's going on in the streets.”

Nesbit is optimistic that voters who list climate as among their top issues will come out in November. He’s also encouraged by polling in the wake of the pandemic that shows a residual trust in experts that cuts across all party lines.

“There is a real trust in experts because [voters] know that those experts are responsible for saving our lives,” he explains. “That carries over into the climate issue that if we need to be prepared for a pandemic or something right now, well, climate change is just over the horizon we should trust the experts there as well.”

A bigger problem may be that no matter how many people claim that climate matters to them in the election, a huge number of them don’t actually vote.

“10.1 million already-registered-to-vote environmentalists stayed home for the 2016 presidential election,” notes Nathaniel Stinnett, Founder and Executive Director of the Environmental Voter Project, an organization dedicated to changing nonvoting environmentalists into voters.

“These people care so deeply about climate and the environment that it's their number one priority,” says Stinnett, “and if we’re able to actually get them out to the polls that can have an enormous impact politically, but also on policymaking.”

Another constituency with a potentially big impact is the Latino community. In 2016 about half of the 27 million eligible Latino voters did not vote. But Vanessa Hauc, a journalist at Telemundo, expects to see significant Latino turnout this fall.

“It has to do with dignity and respect for a community that is here that is working that is giving their best to this country, says Hauc, “and there is not a minimum of respect for what we do.”

Hauc leads the environmental investigation unit at Telemundo and believes Latinos put high priority on climate issues as well. “We have the special relationship with the environment it’s in our DNA,” she says.”[I] try to bring those stories home to my community to make sure that they have the knowledge, the tools, and the information to live a sustainable life.”


RELATED LINKS

Climate Nexus
Environmental Voter Project
Planeta Tierra (Telemundo)

A Way with Words (Series)

Produced by A Way with Words

Most recent piece in this series:

Queen Bee (#1550)

From A Way with Words | Part of the A Way with Words series | 54:00

16545241268_1dacf2cde9_w_small The Orange County Museum of Art commissioned Los Angeles artist Alan Nakagawa to do a project he called "Social Distancing, Haiku, and You," in which he invited the public to write haikus about the experience of living through the Covid-19 pandemic.


Melissa in Grand Prairie, Texas, hails from a family in New Jersey that refers to red pasta sauce with meat in it as gravy. Her family has Italian roots, and in their local dialect, the word for "sauce" can also be translated as "gravy." Sicilian-Americans do this as well. In his book The New York Times Food Encyclopedia, Craig Claiborne says that sauce and gravy mean the same thing. The Sopranos Family Cookbook uses the word gravy in the same way, a usage also immortalized in a famous scene from the hit TV show.


Emily in San Diego, California, wonders about the phrase to dog, meaning "to close and secure" as in to dog a door. In a nautical context, the phrase dog the hatches means to secure them with a bolt or handle designed for that purpose. This phrase probably derives from the idea of securing the hatch as tightly as a tenacious dog locking something in its jaws. To undog a door or hatch is to open it.


Quiz Guy John Chaneski is puzzling over homographs, words that are spelled the same but have different meanings and sometimes different pronunciations. For example, what two words that are spelled the same are suggested by the following clue? An artist is commissioned to paint a picture of the planets, but the patron wants him to get rid of the imaginary lines about which the planet rotates. At that point, the patron would have to wait while the artist does what?  


Angela in Dallas, Texas, remembers her mom's admonition to wash your granny beads, meaning clean the dirt off your neck. Country music star Randy Houser sings about his own granny-beaded neck in his song "Boots On."


The art project called "Social Distancing, Haiku, and You," includes a poem that articulates gratitude to health-care workers on the front lines of the global pandemic.


Sean, who is originally from Ireland, wonders if the term narrowback is considered a slur against the Irish. He also references an earlier conversation of ours about the term skinnymalink and shares a rhyme he remembers from childhood that includes that word. There are many other versions of that rhyme, including one in the book The Lore and Language of Schoolchildren by Iona and Peter Opie.


Our discussion about the phrase Go sit on a tack! prompted a listener to send us a math-minded version, Go divide 22 by 7!.


A North Carolina listener wonders about her mother's comment in response to complaining or pestering: Go dry up and bust! Since the mid-1800s, the slang phrase Dry up! has meant  Stop talking! In the theater world, the term dry up can mean to forget one's lines.


The terms Cuddle death, piping, tooting, quacking, drone comet, and waggle dance are all part of the parlance of beekeepers. The book Queenspotting by Hilary Kearney details these and other bee-related terms. Kearney's website, Girl Next Door Honey, has much more about all things apiary. 


The threat I'm going to cloud up and rain all over you goes back to at least 1911.


Julia in Norfolk, Virginia, wants a verb that denotes the act of making something simple unnecessarily complicated, particularly in a work setting. Some possibilities: complexify, befoul, bemuddle, and embrangle.


A haiku from artist Alan Nakagawa's collection of poems about social distance celebrates the kind of companionship that plants provide.


Dallas, who lives in Eugene, Oregon, wonders why we use number one and number two as euphemisms for "pee" and "poo."


Artist Alan Nakagawa's project involving haikus about social distancing includes a funny take on just how blurred boundaries can become while under lockdown.


This episode is hosted by Grant Barrett and Martha Barnette.

Music 101 (Series)

Produced by KUNC & The Colorado Sound

Most recent piece in this series:

Mx101 Ep104: The Roland TR-808, 7/9/2020

From KUNC & The Colorado Sound | Part of the Music 101 series | 56:59

Music_101_recent_small Simply put, the Roland 808 changed the way music sounded. Prior to its creation, using a drum machine was expensive and they were pretty complicated to program. The Roland 808 was affordable and gave a more "electronic" sound than prior drum machines, which suited the music aesthetic of the 1980s. This week, we'll explore the Roland 808 from the earliest uses to today.

Ozark Highlands Radio (Series)

Produced by Ozark Highlands Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

OHR129: OHR Presents: Black Americana, 8/3/2020

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Dom_flemons_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

In honor of Black History Month, OHR pays tribute to African Americans’ profound contribution to American music.  Forged into the roots of blues, jazz, pop, rock, soul, hip-hop, country, old-time and traditional folk, the influence of African American culture on the American musical landscape cannot be overestimated.  This week, we’ll present songs from a variety of modern world class African American performers of traditional American music, recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas.

Featured on this special episode are Jerron “Blind Boy” Paxton of PBS’ “American Epic,” Amythyst Kiah of Our Native Daughters (recorded live at Oxford American’s South on Main in Little Rock, AR,) Smithsonian Folkways recording artist Dom Flemons, blues and roots music legend Taj Mahal, Carolina Chocolate Drops and Our Native Daughters member Leyla McCalla, and Lela Mae Smith of the Jake Leg Stompers.

In this week’s guest host segment, renowned traditional folk musician, writer, and step dancer Aubrey Atwater explores “The African American Banjo,” illuminating the African roots of this enduring musical instrument.  Aubrey takes us back to the source of the banjo with music and enlightening commentary.

Earth Eats (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

EE 20-28: Emergency Meals On Campus And Handcrafted Fishing Nets In Oregon, 7/10/2020

From WFIU | Part of the Earth Eats series | 29:00

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“I have young fisherman coming to say, ‘You might not remember me, I met you in the eighties, I’ve always wanted to be able to order one of your nets.’”

This week on the show we meet net makers in the commercial fishing industry on the Oregon coast, we hear about a campus emergency summer meal project, Harvest Public Media has a story on large scale sustainable agriculture and a piece about farmers and mental health. 


Folk Alley Weekly (Series)

Produced by WKSU

Most recent piece in this series:

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio (Series)

Produced by Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

421: Machete Makes Tacos: Actor Danny Trejo on Prison, Hollywood and Nachos, 7/9/2020

From Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio | Part of the Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio series | 53:58

Msl_radio_logo_cobrand_prx_small Hollywood star and restaurateur Danny Trejo shares his culinary inspirations and his best stories—for example, how he used to act out The Wizard of Oz to help him stay sane in solitary confinement. Plus, Gena Renaud of Yume Confections teaches us about the art of wagashi; Alex Aïnouz dives into the world of meatballs; and we roast a chicken the Nigella Lawson way.

Reveal Weekly (Series)

Produced by Reveal

Most recent piece in this series:

629: American Rehab: Cowboy Conman, 7/18/2020

From Reveal | Part of the Reveal Weekly series | :00

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With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes (Series)

Produced by With Good Reason

Most recent piece in this series:

Presenting: Transcripts (half)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 29:00

Transcripts-art-380x380_small Even though transgender-themed TV shows like Transparent and Pose have achieved mainstream popularity, trans people still face huge barriers to employment, housing, and safety. In fact, many trans people of color say that their lives are harder than ever before. Transcripts, a new podcast hosted by Myrl Beam and Andrea Jenkins, investigates how trans activists are trying to change that.

Are We Alone?

From Philosophy Talk | Part of the Philosophy Talk series | 53:59

If there is intelligent life beyond Earth, how would that change life ON Earth?

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News that life might exist or have existed on Mars or somewhere else in our universe excites many. But should we really be happy to hear that news? What are the philosophical implications of the possibility of extraterrestrial life? If life can blossom in our own cosmic backyard, then that means that the universe is most likely saturated with life forms. And if that’s the case, why haven’t we found any evidence of other civilizations? Is it because all civilizations are prone to suicidal destruction at a certain point in their development? If so, how might we avoid this fate? The Philosophers search for life with Paul Davies from Arizona State University, author of The Eerie Silence: Renewing Our Search for Alien Intelligence.

Planetary Radio (Series)

Produced by Mat Kaplan

Most recent piece in this series:

To Pluto and Beyond with Alan Stern

From Mat Kaplan | Part of the Planetary Radio series | 28:50

False_color_pluto_small_small It has been 5 years since the New Horizons probe revealed beautiful, surprising Pluto, and 18 months since it showed us the odd little body now known as Arrokoth. Principal Investigator Alan Stern shares the latest science, and tells us what the spacecraft is up to now as it races toward the edge of our solar system. Have you seen the new comet? Bruce Betts tells you where and how to look in this week’s What’s Up. Learn more at https://www.planetary.org/multimedia/planetary-radio/show/2020/0708-2020-alan-stern-new-horizons.html

Living Planet 05/04/2018

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

LLiving Planet: Walk the Walk -

On the show this week: Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

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Living Planet: Walk the Walk

 

Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

 

 

Katowice: A coal town that wants to go green

 

The upcoming COP24 climate summit will be held in Katowice, deep in Poland's industrial and coal mining heartland. Its air quality is among the worst in Europe. But the town is trying to clean up its act. And if Katowice can go green, perhaps anywhere can.

 

Canada's First Nations vs. tar sands pipeline

 

Canadian President Justin Trudeau has been vocal about his commitment to climate protection. But now, he's coming to blows with environmentalists and the provincial government of British Columbia over a massive oil pipeline

Can reflective roads help LA keep its cool?

Los Angeles has the greatest density of cars in the US — and a massive network of roads. In summer the asphalt absorbs sunlight and heats up, warming the air above it, an effect that will be exacerbated by climate change. But cool paving could change all that.

 

 

Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

Living Planet 07/03/2020

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

Lp1_small This week on the show: Splish, splash, comeback! - We hear about how some aquatic animals are undergoing a revival: Record numbers of sea turtles have nested on the Odisha coast in India, while corals in the Red Sea get a break from people. In Yorkshire, beavers are returning to streams — and, caring for crocodiles in Belize.

Tara Austin

From KUMD | Part of the Radio Gallery series | 04:40

This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm.

An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

Playing
Tara Austin
From
KUMD

Tara_austin_5_small This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm. An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

ClassicalWorks (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

CLW 200714 11PM: ClassicalWorks (Episode 308), 7/14/2020 11:00 PM

From WFIU | Part of the ClassicalWorks series | 59:00

Classicalworks_logo_-_luann_johnson_small ClassicalWorks (Episode 308)

Jazz with David Basse (Series)

Produced by Jazz with David Basse, LLC.

Most recent piece in this series:

1589.3: Jazz with David Basse 1589.3, 7/10/2020 2:00 AM

From Jazz with David Basse, LLC. | Part of the Jazz with David Basse series | 59:53

Thumbnail_copy_small Jazz with David Basse

Open Source with Christopher Lydon (Series)

Produced by Open Source

Most recent piece in this series:

Reparations and the Wealth Gap

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source with Christopher Lydon series | 59:00

Screen_shot_2020-07-09_at_5 Forty acres and a mule was the promise made to black slaves, even before the Civil War was over. General Sherman of the Union Army drew up the plan, and Congress took a good look. The price-tag in 1865 would have been roughly $400-million; by today, the black stake in land ownership would have grown ten-thousand-fold by compound interest to several trillion dollars. But the promise, you know, was never kept. As Ida B. Wells put it later, emancipation "left us free, but it also left us homeless, penniless, ignorant, nameless, and friendless.” And there was worse to come in the neo-slavery of Jim Crow.  The debts for slave labor have never been paid. The black and white wealth gap has never begun to close. 

Reparations means payback – in the case of slavery and its aftermath in America, it means payback for irreparable damage, which is to say: it may be practically impossible and morally required. Our history of paying down the debt for slavery is one of promises broken – like the famous offer of 40 acres and a mule to slaves liberated by war; also the short-lived Reconstruction of the South with full citizenship, equality and freedom for black citizens – all of it undone after “seven mystic years,” in W. E. B. Du Bois’s phrase. We have a history also of what looked like good intentions – New Deal benefits in the 1930s, the Federal housing loans that built suburbia after World War 2, but were designed not to include black families.  Reparations is a cause that sleeps but never dies. And it is back full force in a comprehensive book from the University of North Carolina, From Here to Equality: Reparations for Black Americans in the Twenty-First Century. We’re honored to welcome the co-authors this hour: William A. Darity Jr, historian trained as an economist; and Kirsten Mullen, co-writer and lecturer on race, art, history, and politics. 

Blue Dimensions (Series)

Produced by Bluesnet Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

Blue Dimensions I28: Maceo! James Brown's former right-hand man's latest album "Soul Food - Cookin With Maceo"

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Parker_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, new music from the great saxophonist, and singer, Maceo Parker, who was James Brown's right-hand man on stage, and worked with Parliament Funkadelic and many others. "Soul Food Cookin With Maceo" is Parker's first new album in eight years. We'll play several tracks from it. Also: singer Dena DeRose, a new album that includes some stunning duets with Sheila Jordan — we'll hear one of those — and we have new music from two pianists, Christian Sands, his captivating album "Be Water," and Canada's Zen Zadravec, plus the latest from powerful singer Ruthie Foster and her Big Band live in Austin, Texas, singing an anthem of the civil rights movement.

promo included: promo-I28

Blue Dimensions G43: A Trinity Of "Presence"

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Three recent albums all entitled "Presence," from Orrin Evans & The Captain Black Big Band, John Petrucelli, and Brad Whitely.

Evans_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, we are surprised to note that three jazz albums entitled "Presence" have come out in 2018, and we've decided to draw music from all three of them - - one from pianist Orrin Evans & The Captain Black Big Band, some high-energy stuff recorded in concert at two jazz clubs in Philadelphia, one from pianist Brad Whitely, a strong studio recording, and another live one, a double album from saxophonist and composer John Petrucelli with lots of strings and a scallop shell used as an instrument as well. Three engaging and very different albums, all called "Presence," coming up in this hour of Blue Dimensions.

promo included: promo-G43

Feminine Fusion (Series)

Produced by WCNY

Most recent piece in this series:

S04 Ep46: Today's Teachers: Composers, Part 2, 7/18/2020

From WCNY | Part of the Feminine Fusion series | :00

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Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

DWF 19-26: Kissingen Summer, 3/23/2020

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts series | 01:57:56

J_rvi_small We train the microphone on one of today's most exciting conductors and on a brilliant young Russian singer: Paavo Järvi and Julia Lezhneva both perform and share their thoughts on this program from the festival Kissingen Summer.

High Country Celtic Radio (Series)

Produced by High Country Celtic Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

High Country Celtic Radio 119 - Independence Day

From High Country Celtic Radio | Part of the High Country Celtic Radio series | 59:00

High-country-celtic-240x240_medium_small

It's Independence Day in the US, commemorating the separation of the American colonies from the British Empire. As the young nation muscled its way westward, desperate people watched from across the Atlantic and saw the US as a promise of freedom and opportunity. Irish immigrants flocked across the ocean in a bid to gamble on a better life; in this week's show, Katie and Joe play songs and tunes about those who emigrated in search of hope and freedom.

This week, we play Déanta, Burning Bridget Cleary, Caitlín & Ciarán, De Danann, Karan Casey, Danú, Mick Moloney & Athena Tergis, Yvonne Casey, Niall Keegan, Steph Geremia, Reeltime, Frank Harte & Donal Lunny, Grey Larsen & André Marchand, and John Doyle.

Our FairPlé Score this week: 57
 

406: Celebrating the Birthday of Bucky Pizzarelli, 1/1/2019

From KCUR | Part of the 12th Street Jump Weekly series | 59:00

(Air Dates: December 31 - January 8) On this week's archive episode of 12th Street Jump, we celebrate the music of Bucky Pizzarelli with Bucky himself and his long time music partner Ed Laub. We'll play a game of "So, What's Your Question" with Ed and talk to Bucky about what gives him the blues.

Bucky-pizzarelli-08_small

Public Radio's weekly jazz, blues and comedy jam, 12th STREET JUMP celebrates America's original art form, live from one of its birthplaces, 12th Street in Kansas City. That is where Basie tickled and ivories and Big Joe Turner shouted the blues. Each week, host Ebony Fondren offers up a lively hour of topical sketch comedy and some great live jazz and blues from the 12th STREET JUMP band (musical director Joe Cartright, along with Tyrone Clark on bass and Arnold Young on drums) and vocalist David Basse. Special guests join the fun every week down at the 12th Street Jump.

Latin Jazz Perspective (T-5)

From Tony Vasquez | Part of the Latin Perspective - Latin Jazz Hour (weekly) series | 59:01

A weekly radio show featuring the best in classic and contemporary Latin Jazz music. Hosted by Tony Vasquez.

Yvettei_small A weekly radio show featuring the best in classic and contemporary Latin Jazz music. Hosted by Tony Vasquez.
This week edition is a special presentation on the Latin Jazz Flute.
Featuring Latin /Latin Jazz flautists from the past and present who where a major force
in the historical continuum of the music.

Notes from the Jazz Underground #44 - Jazz in Chicago, 2019

From WDCB | Part of the Notes from the Jazz Underground series | 58:00

With all of the internationally lauded Jazz coming out of Chicago these days, Notes from the Jazz Underground takes a look - and a listen - to some of the shining stars of the Chicago Jazz scene.

Nftju_logo_small_small With all of the internationally lauded Jazz coming out of Chicago these days, Notes from the Jazz Underground takes a look - and a listen - to some of the shining stars of the Chicago Jazz scene.