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Playlist: 2018 Possible New Programs

Compiled By: KRPS

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The Pulse (Series)

Produced by WHYY

Most recent piece in this series:

318: New Problems , 1/17/2020

From WHYY | Part of the The Pulse series | 58:59

3000x3000_itunes_thepulse_1_small In the decades after the Civil War, the nation was changing rapidly. Cities were industrializing, the railroad was expanding, business was booming in many places, people were busy! Life in the fast lane seemed to have an impact; a condition that soon became known as Neurasthenia. Some of the symptoms were fatigue, irritability, and digestion problems. We would probably call this stress, or burnout today. Each time period has its own problems that people try to name, and get under control. Often, new inventions come with unintended consequences. On this episode, we look into the new problems of our times, and what we’re doing about them. Is vaping still a good strategy to quit smoking? Can clunky electronic health records be fixed? We also find out what therapists know about helping people who need to be online for their jobs, and are targeted by trolls.

Climate One (Series)

Produced by Climate One

Most recent piece in this series:

2020-01-17 Exploring Climate Psychology / Getting Outside in the Digital Age

From Climate One | Part of the Climate One series | 58:56

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Host: Greg Dalton

Guests:
Part One:
Renee Lertzman, Climate Engagement Strategist; Author, Environmental Melancholia: Psychoanalytic Dimensions of Engagement (Routledge, 2016)
Leslie Davenport, Psychotherapist; Author, Emotional Resiliency in the Era of Climate Change: A Clinician’s Guide (Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2017)
Bryant Welch, Clinical Psychologist; Author, State of Confusion: Political Manipulation and the Assault on the American Mind (2018)

Part Two:
Phil Ginsburg, General Manager, San Francisco Recreation and Parks
Rebecca Johnson, Co-Director, Citizen Science at the California Academy of Sciences
Nooshin Razani, Pediatrician and Founder/Director of the Center for Nature and Health at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland

We all know about the environmental effects of climate change. But what about its impact on our mental health? Therapists report that their patients are exhibiting symptoms of what they call “climate anxiety” – loss of sleep, changes in appetite, feelings of grief, anger and hopelessness. One way to cope with the stress and depression brought on by global warming is to get out into the natural world. Two discussions from the past year explore the psychology of climate change and the importance of reconnecting with nature to maintain physical and mental well-being.

 

Part One was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on November 29, 2018, and originally aired on December 16, 2018.
Part Two was recorded at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on March 15, 2019, and originally aired on March 22, 2019.

We all know about the environmental and physical effects of climate change. But what about its impact on our mental health?  According to some psychologists, their patients who report trouble sleeping, changes in appetite, feelings of dread or hopelessness, could be suffering from climate anxiety.

 

“I’m starting to notice in my practice that sometimes people come in with ambient anxiety,” reports clinical psychotherapist Leslie Davenport. “They’re just more distressed, even if they haven't always connected the dots about why.”

 

Davenport likens her patients’ feelings about climate change to the five stages of grief.

“Really what we're talking about is any kind of loss,” she says. “Loss of identity, loss of lifestyle, loss of environment…the degradation we’re talking about can trigger a very similar process.

There are ways to cope with stress and depression brought on by climate change. One very simple form of therapy? Close the laptop, turn off your phone and get into nature. Research has shown that all the benefits engaging more deeply with nature are enhanced when people leave their screens behind.

“If you take an urban person and you put them in the forest, within a few minutes you’ll see improvement in heart rate in blood pressure,” says Nooshin Razani, Director of the Center for Nature and Health at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland. “Around 20 minutes you’ll see improvements in attention span…[within] 90 minutes they've shown that depression goes down.”

As General Manager of San Francisco’s Parks Department, Phil Ginsburg has made it his mission to ensure that every child has a nature-based experience every day. “The generation of children that are growing up today is the most sedentary generation of kids in our history,” he laments. “The impact to mental health, the impact on creativity, relationship building – all these things happen easier in nature without a phone.”

Like Razani, Ginsburg works with underserved communities to ensure that the city’s park system is more equitable and inviting to an increasingly urbanized population. “Nature is not about the once a year trip to Yosemite or to Glacier [National Park],” Ginsburg emphasizes, “nature is in your city, it’s in your backyard, it’s where we are.”

Related Links:

Emotional Resiliency in the Era of Climate Change: A Clinician’s Guide (Leslie Davenport)

Environmental Melancholia: Psychoanalytic Dimensions of Engagement (Renee Lertzman)

State of Confusion: Political Manipulation and the Assault on the American Mind (Bryant Welch)

iNaturalist – A Community for Naturalists

Center for Nature and Health at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital

David Strayer: Restore Your Brain with Nature (TEDx)

 

San Francisco Cities Teen Outdoor Experience

A Way with Words (Series)

Produced by A Way with Words

Most recent piece in this series:

Tiger Tail (#1540)

From A Way with Words | Part of the A Way with Words series | 54:00

5543641666_6b83f7cdd6_w_small This episode is supported in part by Yabla, language immersion through engaging videos and patented learning technology, for Spanish, French, Italian, German, Chinese and English. Stream real TV shows enjoy and learn at the same time! For a free trial, visit yabla.com/awaywithwords.
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You may have a favorite word in English, but how about one from another language? Martha likes the Spanish term ojala because it's handy for expressing hopefulness, and has an interesting history, deriving from inshallah, Arabic for "God willing." Grant tells a story about a Cuban radio personality named Jorge Jueves.


Terese from Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania, wants to popularize the word yipka, a term a friend uses for "old clothes you wear around the house."
 
Bundu is a Bantu word meaning "a largely uninhabited wild region far from town." It was adopted into South African slang and ultimately into British English, and appears in the phrase  out in the bundus, with the same meaning. Although it sounds like out in the boondocks, these two phrases are completely unrelated etymologically.


Stephanie in Green Bay, Wisconsin, was puzzled when a colleague used the expression like grabbing a wolf by the ears to describe an impossible task. Like the idiom to have a tiger by the tail, it suggests the paralyzing difficulty of having hold of a dangerous beast. The Roman playwright Terence expressed the same idea with auribus teneo lupum, or "I have a wolf by the ears." Thomas Jefferson used the phraseWe have a wolf by the ears in a letter about slavery.


Author, poet, and historian Jennifer Michael Hecht has observed that although medical advice even from 100 years ago can be wildly outmoded, expressions of love written two millennia ago can have deep resonance, creating what she calls a "clatter of recognition." That, she says, is why she turns to art, not science, for answers to life's most profound questions.


Quiz Guy John Chaneski presents a terminal deletion game popular among fellow members of The National Puzzlers' League. A terminal deletion involves dropping the first and last letters of a word to form a new one. For example, the word ample is a terminal deletion of sampled. So If you terminally delete the word for a large wooden box, you'll get a large rodent. What's the word?


Jolene is originally from Trinidad, and recalls that when she wanted to ask her friends to get together for some loosely organized socializing, she'dinvite them to go lime or liming. No one's sure of the etymology, although the Dictionary of the English/Creole of Trinidad & Tobago suggests the term may derive from limey, a derogatory name for British and later U.S. servicemembers. Another possibility is that liming originated with the idea that everyone who didn't get invited to a party might instead get together on their own, metaphorically sucking limes -- a kind of citrus-flavored version of sour grapes.


Sometimes children misunderstand language with hilarious results. But sometimes even adults can be tripped up by homonyms. Working behind the seafood counter in a supermarket, John from San Diego, California, had some embarrassing miscommunications when customers were looking for crab crackers and lox.


Deanna from Whitefish, Montana, has a dispute with her husband over the definition of potpie. She says it's a type of soup with dumplings; he says it can't be called a pie if it doesn't have a crust. The Pennsylvania Dutch version with chicken and noodles is known as Bot Boi.


Robert from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, was surprised to find when working in Siberia that children there are taught to use different words to say the sound an animal makes. For example, English speakers say cock-a-doodle-doo, but children in Siberia are taught the sound is more like koh-kock-a-ree. In fact, renderings of animal sounds vary from language to language.


A listener writes in with a story about her toddler wailing that he was King Wet, which puzzled her until the little guy clarified just how wet: I'm So King Wet!


The poem "Abide" by Ellen Birkett Morris offers elegant advice about slowing down and paying attention. The poem appears in the anthology Running with Water, published by V Press LC and is read with permission of the author.


Mary Gordon in Austin, Texas, shares a delightful story about her elderly father and a handful of vegetables, which raises the question: what's the plural of squash? Squashes? Or squash?
 
Semby from Los Angeles, California, wants to know about the term saditty, also spelled seditty, which refers to someone who is stuck up or puts on airs. Used almost exclusively among African Americans, this term may be simply a fancy pronunciation of the word sedate. There is also speculation that it derives from the word Saturday, a day of the week when you might be more dressed up than usual.


After Sarah moved from Wisconsin to Iowa, she sparked some momentary confusion when she asked a store clerk where his TYME machine was. In parts of Wisconsin, Florida, and Michigan there are automated teller machines, or ATMs, called TYME machines, TYME being an acronym for Take Your Money Everywhere.


Growing up in Massachusetts, David always used the word bubbler to denote a drinking fountain. So he was flabbergasted during a trip to Southern Indiana when no one had any idea what he meant when he asked where he could find a bubbler. He might not have had that problem had he been wearing a T-shirt from the Wisconsin Historical Society. Wisconsin is one of the few places in the world besides parts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island where people call drinking fountains bubblers. 


This episode is hosted by Grant Barrett and Martha Barnette.

Music 101 (Series)

Produced by KUNC & The Colorado Sound

Most recent piece in this series:

Mx101 Ep81: Arena Rock, 1/16/2020

From KUNC & The Colorado Sound | Part of the Music 101 series | 57:00

Music_101_recent_small In the 70s, a type of music that was designed to play well in large venues became increasingly popular. Some call it Dad Rock but in its heyday, it was called Arena Rock. Think bands like Rush, Queen, Styx, etc... We'll highlight Arena Rock on this episode of Music 101.

Ozark Highlands Radio (Series)

Produced by Ozark Highlands Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

OHR112: OHR Presents: Mandolin Orange, 1/20/2020

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Mandolin_orange_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s historic 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, a very special episode.  Ozark Highlands Radio partners with Oxford American Magazine to bring Chapel Hill, North Carolina based rising contemporary folk and Americana superstars “Mandolin Orange,” recorded live at South on Main in downtown Little Rock, Arkansas.  Also, an interview with Oxford American Literary Project executive director Ryan Harris.  Mandolin Orange are joined in this performance by Eli West on guitar & banjo, Josh Oliver on electric guitar, Clint Mulligan on Bass, and Joe Westerlund on drums.

“The Oxford American is a nonprofit organization with a mission to explore the complexity and vitality of the American South through excellent writing, visual art, and events programming. Our quarterly print magazine was founded in 1992, and, in addition to winning four National Magazine Awards, has helped launch the writing careers of such noted authors as Jesmyn Ward and John Jeremiah Sullivan, while publishing beloved writers like Charles Portis, Nikky Finney, Peter Guralnick, and many others.

“Our concert series at South on Main in Little Rock is an extension of the magazine, creating meaningful opportunities for the community to experience the most culturally significant artists in our region.

“The OA has a longstanding history of curating great music. Our Winter 2018 issue is dedicated to the music of North Carolina. It is our twentieth installment of the series, which the Houston Chronicle calls "the single best music-related magazine of any given year." Each music issue comes with a sought-after CD, curated by the editors to showcase the region's hugely
varied musical legacy.”

More information about Oxford American programming, the magazine, and their mission can be found at
https://www.oxfordamerican.org 

“Mandolin Orange is an Americana/folk duo based out of Chapel Hill, North Carolina.The group was formed in 2009 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina and consists of the group's songwriter Andrew Marlin (vocals, mandolin, guitar, banjo) and Emily Frantz (vocals, violin, guitar). Mandolin Orange has produced five albums of Marlin's original works of American roots music. In the last three years, the group has toured throughout the U.S and Europe, including appearances at Austin City Limits, South-by-Southwest, Telluride Bluegrass Festival, Newport Folk Festival, Pickathon, and Merlefest. They signed to Yep Roc Records in 2013 and have produced four albums under their umbrella, This Side of Jordan, Such Jubilee, Blindfaller and Tides of a Teardrop.”

Learn more about Mandolin Orange at
-  http://www.mandolinorange.com/#home-section 

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1981 archival recording of Ozark originals Pat & Bob Momich performing the traditional tune “Soldier’s Joy,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Earth Eats (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

EE 20-03: Have Sheep, Will Farm--Part III, 1/17/2020

From WFIU | Part of the Earth Eats series | 29:00

Ee_logo_small

This week on our show it’s part three of our series, Have Sheep, Will Farm, the story of Lauren McAllister and Brett Volpp, their family, their flock of sheep and their journey towards a farm of their own. We’ll learn about their dreams for Three Flock Farm and the opportunities and obstacles along the way.


Folk Alley Weekly (Series)

Produced by WKSU

Most recent piece in this series:

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio (Series)

Produced by Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

304: The Ace of Cakes: Duff Goldman Bakes Up The Hogwarts Express, 1/16/2020

From Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio | Part of the Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio series | 53:59

Msl_radio_logo_cobrand_prx_small Former graffiti artist Duff Goldman bakes cakes in the shape of everything from Radio City Music Hall to old sneakers. Plus we explore Korean home cooking with chef Sohui Kim, and J. Kenji López-Alt investigates the science of no-knead bread. (Originally aired January 31, 2019. Available for rerun January 16-23, 2020.)

Reveal Weekly (Series)

Produced by Reveal

Most recent piece in this series:

604: Fancy Galleries, Fake Art, 1/25/2020

From Reveal | Part of the Reveal Weekly series | :00

no audio file

With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes (Series)

Produced by With Good Reason

Most recent piece in this series:

Redlining and Reparations (Half)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 28:59

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The homeownership gap between whites and African Americans has exploded since the housing bust. It’s now wider than it was during the Jim Crow era.  LaDale Winling (Virginia Tech) says this has its roots in the redlining and race-based denial of home loans dating back to the 1930s.  Also: We’re in the midst of a generation change in where we live.  Tim Murray (Virginia Military Institute) says Millennials, saddled with student loans, are delaying home-buying, while Baby Boomers are selling their over-large houses or downsizing.


Are We Alone?

From Philosophy Talk | Part of the Philosophy Talk series | 53:59

If there is intelligent life beyond Earth, how would that change life ON Earth?

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News that life might exist or have existed on Mars or somewhere else in our universe excites many. But should we really be happy to hear that news? What are the philosophical implications of the possibility of extraterrestrial life? If life can blossom in our own cosmic backyard, then that means that the universe is most likely saturated with life forms. And if that’s the case, why haven’t we found any evidence of other civilizations? Is it because all civilizations are prone to suicidal destruction at a certain point in their development? If so, how might we avoid this fate? The Philosophers search for life with Paul Davies from Arizona State University, author of The Eerie Silence: Renewing Our Search for Alien Intelligence.

Planetary Radio (Series)

Produced by Mat Kaplan

Most recent piece in this series:

The MILO Institute: Opening the Solar System for Exploration by All

From Mat Kaplan | Part of the Planetary Radio series | 28:50

Milo_booth_at_2018_iac_-_antonio_stark_small_small Planetary scientist and bestselling author Jim Bell is joined by space entrepreneur Lon Levin to tell us about the MILO Institute, a new collaboration by Arizona State University, Lockheed Martin and other organizations that hopes to make robotic exploration of our solar system much more accessible. Solar System Specialist Emily Lakdawalla takes us to the newly-discovered habitable zone world that’s a mere 100 light years from Earth.

Living Planet 05/04/2018

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

LLiving Planet: Walk the Walk -

On the show this week: Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

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Living Planet: Walk the Walk

 

Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

 

 

Katowice: A coal town that wants to go green

 

The upcoming COP24 climate summit will be held in Katowice, deep in Poland's industrial and coal mining heartland. Its air quality is among the worst in Europe. But the town is trying to clean up its act. And if Katowice can go green, perhaps anywhere can.

 

Canada's First Nations vs. tar sands pipeline

 

Canadian President Justin Trudeau has been vocal about his commitment to climate protection. But now, he's coming to blows with environmentalists and the provincial government of British Columbia over a massive oil pipeline

Can reflective roads help LA keep its cool?

Los Angeles has the greatest density of cars in the US — and a massive network of roads. In summer the asphalt absorbs sunlight and heats up, warming the air above it, an effect that will be exacerbated by climate change. But cool paving could change all that.

 

 

Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

Living Planet 01/10/2020

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

Lp2_small This week on the show: Wildfires and reforestation - We've got trees on the brain in light of devastating wildfires raging across Australia. We look at trees' role in fighting climate change and how we can help trees adapt to a changing climate. On a more seasonal note, we'll also look at how New Yorkers are getting rid of their Christmas trees.

Tara Austin

From KUMD | Part of the Radio Gallery series | 04:40

This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm.

An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

Playing
Tara Austin
From
KUMD

Tara_austin_5_small This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm. An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

ClassicalWorks (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

CLW 200121 11PM: ClassicalWorks (Episode 412), 1/21/2020 11:00 PM

From WFIU | Part of the ClassicalWorks series | 59:00

Classicalworks_logo_-_luann_johnson_small ClassicalWorks (Episode 412)

Jazz with David Basse (Series)

Produced by Jazz with David Basse, LLC.

Most recent piece in this series:

1669.3: Jazz with David Basse 1669.3, 1/17/2020 2:00 AM

From Jazz with David Basse, LLC. | Part of the Jazz with David Basse series | 59:53

Thumbnail_copy_small Jazz with David Basse

Open Source with Christopher Lydon (Series)

Produced by Open Source

Most recent piece in this series:

The Costs of War

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source with Christopher Lydon series | 59:00

Screen_shot_2020-01-16_at_11 A trillion dollars here, a trillion dollars there — pretty soon, as the man said, you’re talking real money. But you’re not even close to counting the costs of the US “forever wars” in the Middle East. The numbers are sky high, the questions are profound: more than $6 trillion paid out since 9/11 for missions to Afghanistan, Iraq ,and Pakistan, one trillion of the six just for interest on a borrowed-money war. Who owns that debt, and who will pay it, when? If you can’t think in trillions, try equivalences and opportunities lost: money for 21st century wars could have retired all student debt five times over; could have built thousands of miles of high-speed rail; could have financed Medicare for most of us. The government doesn’t audit its empire, but scholars do.

The hidden costs of the long, losing war in the Middle East can break your heart when you learn the disproportionate deaths of innocents. They could break the bank when the credit card debt on six trillion dollars’ worth of war comes due. We are getting highlights this hour from a remarkable network of auditors, in effect, on the dangerous downside of empire.  About two dozen independent scholars of history, economics, and warfare are linked in a Cost-of-War project to tell us what the government would like us to ignore – starting with that point that our wars since 9/ll have been financed by borrowing, the main reason our debt exceeds our GNP, meaning we owe more than we produce in a year. Just the interest paid in on the credit-card war era is more than a trillion dollars. 

 

Blue Dimensions (Series)

Produced by Bluesnet Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

Blue Dimensions I03: "The Movement Revisited: A Musical Portrait Of Four Icons" from Christian McBride

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Mcbride_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, Christian McBride's work "The Movement Revisited: A Musical Portrait Of Four Icons." We'll hear several pieces from this mix of music and spoken word celebrating the civil rights movement, and Martin Luther King Jr, Rosa Parks, Muhammad Ali, and Malcolm X, from an album issued this year. The work goes back to 1998, with a major revision/addition in 2010, which added a movement noting the election of Barack Obama as President of the United States in 2008. Also: John Coltrane's music written to the words of Martin Luther King Jr., based on the cadences of King's speech after the bombing of a black church in Birmingham AL in 1963 that killed four girls in the church. Plus: saxophonist Teodross Avery's interpretation of a Coltrane piece about his African roots.

promo included: promo-I03

Blue Dimensions G43: A Trinity Of "Presence"

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Three recent albums all entitled "Presence," from Orrin Evans & The Captain Black Big Band, John Petrucelli, and Brad Whitely.

Evans_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, we are surprised to note that three jazz albums entitled "Presence" have come out in 2018, and we've decided to draw music from all three of them - - one from pianist Orrin Evans & The Captain Black Big Band, some high-energy stuff recorded in concert at two jazz clubs in Philadelphia, one from pianist Brad Whitely, a strong studio recording, and another live one, a double album from saxophonist and composer John Petrucelli with lots of strings and a scallop shell used as an instrument as well. Three engaging and very different albums, all called "Presence," coming up in this hour of Blue Dimensions.

promo included: promo-G43

Feminine Fusion (Series)

Produced by WCNY

Most recent piece in this series:

S04 Ep20: Patchwork Quilt, Part XVIII, 1/18/2020

From WCNY | Part of the Feminine Fusion series | :00

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Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

DWF 19-17: Night Music, 1/20/2020

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts series | 01:57:57

190716_daniil_trifonov_bamberger_symphoniker_jakub_hrusa_c_rmf_ansgar_klostermann_0791_small Nighttime, the time of dreams and fantasies, has always inspired music, notably Antonio Vivaldi, who's the centerpiece of this concert at the Beethovenfest designed by recorder player Dorothee Oberlinger. Revolving around Vivaldi is a colorful kaleidoscope of nighttime pieces from various European countries that tell stories of cradle songs, ghosts, birds of the night and the holiest of all nights.

High Country Celtic Radio (Series)

Produced by High Country Celtic Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

High Country Celtic Radio 094 - Nollaig Na mBan

From High Country Celtic Radio | Part of the High Country Celtic Radio series | 59:00

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Nollaig Na mBan, "Women's Christmas", marks the end of the holiday season in Ireland. It's a time when women get to go out and celebrate while men stay at home, do all the chores, and clean up after the holidays. We celebrate by playing music dominated by women performers; there are some men in the bands, but the women (for once) outnumber and outpower the men on every track.

This week, we play music from NicGaviskey, Síle Denvir, The Friel Sisters, Ruth Keggin, Fiddlers2, Lisa O'neill, Julie Fowlis, Various Artists, The Jammy Dodgers, Niamh Dunne, Lankum, Mari Black, Fódhla, Harem Scarem, and The Poozies.

Our FairPlé score this week: 100

406: Celebrating the Birthday of Bucky Pizzarelli, 1/1/2019

From KCUR | Part of the 12th Street Jump Weekly series | 59:00

(Air Dates: December 31 - January 8) On this week's archive episode of 12th Street Jump, we celebrate the music of Bucky Pizzarelli with Bucky himself and his long time music partner Ed Laub. We'll play a game of "So, What's Your Question" with Ed and talk to Bucky about what gives him the blues.

Bucky-pizzarelli-08_small

Public Radio's weekly jazz, blues and comedy jam, 12th STREET JUMP celebrates America's original art form, live from one of its birthplaces, 12th Street in Kansas City. That is where Basie tickled and ivories and Big Joe Turner shouted the blues. Each week, host Ebony Fondren offers up a lively hour of topical sketch comedy and some great live jazz and blues from the 12th STREET JUMP band (musical director Joe Cartright, along with Tyrone Clark on bass and Arnold Young on drums) and vocalist David Basse. Special guests join the fun every week down at the 12th Street Jump.

Latin Jazz Perspective (T-5)

From Tony Vasquez | Part of the Latin Perspective - Latin Jazz Hour (weekly) series | 59:01

A weekly radio show featuring the best in classic and contemporary Latin Jazz music. Hosted by Tony Vasquez.

Yvettei_small A weekly radio show featuring the best in classic and contemporary Latin Jazz music. Hosted by Tony Vasquez.
This week edition is a special presentation on the Latin Jazz Flute.
Featuring Latin /Latin Jazz flautists from the past and present who where a major force
in the historical continuum of the music.

Notes from the Jazz Underground #44 - Jazz in Chicago, 2019

From WDCB | Part of the Notes from the Jazz Underground series | 58:00

With all of the internationally lauded Jazz coming out of Chicago these days, Notes from the Jazz Underground takes a look - and a listen - to some of the shining stars of the Chicago Jazz scene.

Nftju_logo_small_small With all of the internationally lauded Jazz coming out of Chicago these days, Notes from the Jazz Underground takes a look - and a listen - to some of the shining stars of the Chicago Jazz scene.