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Playlist: 2013 Feb-Mar

Compiled By: PRX Remix

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The Broad Experience 12 - Kenyan entrepreneurs

From Ashley Milne-Tyte | Part of the The Broad Experience series | 12:35

Lily--clean
Appropriate for day, afternoon, evening
No credit needed
*Out of all episodes, this one had the best interviews.

Img_2278_small Africa's economies are growing fast, and this is partly linked to entrepreneurship. Women make up a large number of African entrepreneurs, so when I went to Kenya in January I was keen to interview a couple. Find out why Kenyan men are apparently chilling out as Kenyan women do more and more in the workforce, and meet the young woman who is putting the youth from Africa's largest slum on the filmmaking map.

The Broad Experience 11: Women of a Certain Age

From Ashley Milne-Tyte | Part of the The Broad Experience series | 14:30

Lily--clean
No intro needed
Appropriate for day, afternoon, evening
*Host and interview audio uneven throughout.

Tbe_r1podcasticons_r2-01_small How does a woman's age affect her life at work? Hillary Clinton may be going gangbusters at 65, but can the rest of us hope for a fruitful career later in life? Tune in to hear from one successful executive who's navigating the sometimes choppy waters of life as an 'older woman' at work, and find out why it's never too late to decide to do something new with your life.

The Broad Experience 10: selling stereotypes

From Ashley Milne-Tyte | Part of the The Broad Experience series | 18:30

Lily--"bitch" at 06:33, pre-bleeped at 12:03
No intro needed
Appropriate for afternoon, evening
Note: discussion on female sexuality
*Host and interview audio uneven throughout.

Tbe_r1podcasticons_r2-01_small In this episode we look at the way women come across in the media (where else can you wear a cocktail dress in the middle of the day?) and how that affects the way young women think about what they're capable of in life.

The Broad Experience 9: Ambition and Power

From Ashley Milne-Tyte | Part of the The Broad Experience series | 08:27

Lily--clean
No intro needed
Appropriate for day, afternoon, evening
*Audio decent.

Tbe_r1podcasticons_r2-01_small Are women ambitious? Will they be judged harshly if they admit it? The latest episode of The Broad Experience explores women's relationship with ambition and power, and asks if they even have the same meaning for women that they do for men.

The Broad Experience 8: The Good Girls Revolt

From Ashley Milne-Tyte | Part of the The Broad Experience series | 09:19

Lily--clean
No intro needed
Appropriate for day, afternoon, evening
*Audio decent. Likable interviewee.

Goodgirls_small Working at Newsweek in the sixties was fun, if not exactly glamorous, and the young women there felt lucky to have good jobs. There was just one problem: company policy said women couldn't be writers. That was a man's role. Most of the women accepted it as 'just the way things were' until 1970, when they decided to shake things up. Tune in to hear ex-Newsweek writer and veteran journalist Lynn Povich talk about the class action lawsuit that changed the workplace for women in the media and many other industries.

The Broad Experience 6: will Gen Y women change everything?

From Ashley Milne-Tyte | Part of the The Broad Experience series | 08:42

Lily--clean
No intro needed
Appropriate for day, afternoon, evening
*Audio decent--likable/relatable interviewee.

Tbe_r1podcasticons_r2-01_small In this show we hear from Amanda Pouchot, 20-something co-founder of the Levo League, whose mission is to help Generation Y women get to the top.

The Broad Experience 7: Non-white and female at work

From Ashley Milne-Tyte | Part of the The Broad Experience series | 12:01

Lily--clean
No intro needed
Appropriate for day, afternoon, evening
*Audio decent. Likable interviewee.

Tbe_r1podcasticons_r2-01_small In this show we talk to a guy who did not think of himself as an obvious candidate for diversity training (he survived and thrived). Then there's the young reporter whose first job, for a prestigious global publication, pitted her against an office full of white men who, she felt, had no idea where she was coming from. Oh, and she was frequently mistaken for the tea lady when on assignment.

The Broad Experience, episode 5: female entrepreneurship

From Ashley Milne-Tyte | Part of the The Broad Experience series | 10:50

Lily--clean
No intro needed
Appropriate for day, afternoon, evening
*Host & interview audio uneven throughout.

Tbe_r1podcasticons_r2-01_small There's a lot of buzz around the topic of female entrepreneurship right now. But the statistics on female business owners haven't changed much lately, and women's firms are far less likely than men's to grow and make large amounts of money. In this episode of The Broad Experience, we look at what's real about female entrepreneurship and what's hype.

The Broad Experience, episode 4: getting ahead

From Ashley Milne-Tyte | Part of the The Broad Experience series | 11:51

Lily--clean
No intro needed
Appropriate for day, afternoon, evening
*Host audio levels uneven throughout piece.

Tbe_r1podcasticons_r2-01_small There is no glass ceiling. So says Financial Times columnist Mrs. Moneypenny. If women aren't getting to the top, she says, they have no one to blame but themselves. But McKinsey & Company recently released a body of research on women and work that suggests otherwise. McKinsey director Joanna Barsh talks about her findings, and how she belatedly realized the ways in which she hurt her own progress over the years.

The Broad Experience, episode three - women in tech

From Ashley Milne-Tyte | Part of the The Broad Experience series | 07:56

Lily--clean
No intro needed
Appropriate for day, afternoon, evening
*Host audio and interview audio, very uneven levels.

Broadexperiencephoto_small Public radio reporter Ashley Milne-Tyte brings you a podcast about women, the workplace and success. In episode three, we ask why so few women work in tech, and why it matters. With Gina Trapani, Vivek Wadhwa and Adda Birnir.

The Broad Experience, episode two

From Ashley Milne-Tyte | Part of the The Broad Experience series | 09:38

Lily--clean
No intro needed
Appropriate for day, afternoon, evening

Broadexperiencephoto_small Public radio reporter Ashley Milne-Tyte brings you a podcast on women, the workplace and success. In episode two: what men have to gain from equality (a better love life, among other things), and which qualities make for a good leader.

The Broad Experience, episode one

From Ashley Milne-Tyte | Part of the The Broad Experience series | 10:11

Lily--clean
No intro needed
Appropriate for day, afternoon, evening
*Interview audio considerably lower volume than host audio.

Broadexperiencephoto_small Public radio reporter Ashley Milne-Tyte brings you a smart, provocative conversation about women and the workplace. Influential guests talk about the issues that affect women at work every day. Almost 60 percent of women between 22 and 64 are in the workforce, but fewer than four percent of CEOs are female. Women have complicated lives, certainly, and not everyone wants the top job. Still, in 2012 many women continue to struggle with problems like how and when to speak up (and when to tone it down for fear of being labeled 'too aggressive'), how to ask for more money and how to manage work, family, and other people, to name a few.

Albert Appel

From You're U.S. | Part of the You're U.S. series | 09:16

Lily--clean
No intro needed
Appropriate for day, afternoon, evening

Playing
Albert Appel
From
You're U.S.

Albert_appel_med_copy_2_small


Albert Appel by Emile B. Klein
Oil on Canvas on Panel, 9.5" x 11" 
 

As the crow flies, Albert Appel’s farm in Elmer, New Jersey is a scant 30 miles from Philadelphia, his urban birthplace. He began as a city boy, but for almost seven decades now he’s been chief cook and bottle washer of his own promised land.

 

He’s a man who respects and identifies with children, especially the rabble rousers. “They should have the experience of doing it wrong and it didn’t kill you. It keeps you from being really angry at everybody.” So many children, including his own, have gone off from this farm to play music, make art, grow and cook good food, craft things with their hands, and try out life for themselves. He’s is so proud of the children, and the music.

Albert Appel was born between the world wars, when everything was changing, especially for the Jews. His parents gave their son violin lessons, and sent him to a fine academic high school (where, he says, he mostly slept). While other high-achieving sons of immigrants were flocking into business and the professions, young Albert was moved, instead, by a spirit of practical idealism.

So, when it was time for him to set out into the world, Albert Appel left home with a dream in his pocket and a violin. His dream was to become a farmer, and become a farmer he did. But it was the violin that changed everything.

While World War II was raging, Albert studied and worked other people’s land until, at the age of 22, he was able to buy his own farm. He and his first wife, a young refugee pianist, started a family. Friends brought their children to the farm to play music and taste the freedom of the countryside. In 1960 the idea came to him: Start a summer music and arts camp for children. So Albert Appel took a chicken farm and a violin and built a world.

Now, Albert is in his 10th decade of life. The summer camp has grown into a year-round music, arts, and farm center. He lives with his wife across the country road.  He reads, listens to music, plays with kittens, remembers stories, forgets names. “I know I’m privileged,” he says. “I’ve gotten to do what I like.”

He says other people do all the work now. As for him, he plays his violin every day in a big, sunny room. He’s not practicing. He’s living. He says the music has another kind of feeling when you’ve heard it so many times before. The violin is his old friend, the music a pentimento of sounds, more beautiful for all the memories it carries.

Albert Appel is a man who knows how to grow a dream. You work hard, you make it as beautiful as you can, and you invite everyone.  And you have a really good time. Appel Farm: Albert Appel built it, and the people came.

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Biography by Lorelei Sontag

Life on the Party Line

From Andrew Bales | Part of the Into It series | 02:07

Today's privacy concerns with cell phones seem trivial when we look back at the world of open telephone wires.

Party-line-2_small Today's privacy concerns with cell phones seem trivial when we look back at the world of open telephone wires.

Time Zones: a World History

From Andrew Bales | Part of the Into It series | 01:53

Time zones reflect a history of our changing politics, commerce, and technology.

Worldtimezone-sarong-map0_small Time zones reflect a history of our changing politics, commerce, and technology.

Dance Until the World Ends

From Andrew Bales | Part of the Into It series | 02:19

A look at the odd trend of "doomsday" music that took over the pop charts leading up to the Mayan end date.

Britney-spears-1_small A look at the odd trend of "doomsday" music that took over the pop charts leading up to the Mayan end date.

The Mysterious Life of the Rubber Ducky

From Andrew Bales | Part of the Into It series | 01:54

Rubber Duckies aren't just an old fashioned bathtub toy.

Ducky_trail_small Rubber Duckies aren't just an old fashioned bathtub toy.

Imaginary Island of California

From Andrew Bales | Part of the Into It series | 01:45

The Island of California appeared on maps for over a century.

California_island_small The Island of California appeared on maps for over a century.

Melissa's Diary, Part 1: Teen Mom

From Radio Diaries | Part of the Teenage Diaries series | 29:20

Melissa didn't mean to get pregnant. After 12 years of living in the foster care system, she's trying to build the family she never had. "The funny thing about a having a baby, especially a boy, is that he always pisses on me. Always. Any time I change him, he's always peeing on me. I don't know why. He's marking his territory. Like he says, 'This is mine.'"

Melissa first recorded with Radio Diaries in the late 1990's. Now 16 years later we're giving her a microphone again to hear what's happened since and how much has changed. Audio here includes her original diary and our recent podcast, where we meet the Melissa of today.

This story is part of the Teenage Diaries series produced by Radio Diaries for NPR.

Td_melissa_004_l_small Melissa didn't mean to get pregnant. But now, after 12 years of living in the foster care system, she's trying to build the family she never had. "The funny thing about a having a baby, especially a boy, is that he always pisses on me. Always. Any time I change him, he's always peeing on me. I don't know why. He's marking his territory. Like he says, 'This is mine.'"

This story is part of the Teenage Diaries series  produced by Radio Diaries for NPR. Since 1996, Executive Producer Joe Richman has been giving tape recorders to young people around the country to document their lives. In December of 2012, Radio Diaries will revisit five of the original diarists 16 years after their first recordings. The series is broadcast on NPR's All Things Considered.

 

Juan's Diary, Part 1: Looking at the Rio Grande

From Radio Diaries | Part of the Teenage Diaries series | 24:32

Juan crossed the Rio Grande illegally into Texas four years before he first recorded with Radio Diaries. At the time of his original diary, Juan and his family lived in a poor community just this side of the US-Mexican border.

This story is part of the Teenage Diaries series produced by Radio Diaries for NPR.

*Podcast with Juan's Teenage Diary also included.

Juan_small Juan and his family crossed the Rio Grande illegally into Texas four years ago. Now they live in a poor community just this side of the US-Mexican border.

This story is part of the  Teenage Diaries series  produced by Radio Diaries for NPR. Since 1996, Executive Producer Joe Richman has been giving tape recorders to young people around the country to document their lives. In December of 2012, Radio Diaries will revisit five of the original diarists 16 years after their first recordings. The series airs on NPR’s  All Things Considered    

Juan's Diary, Part 1: Looking at the Rio Grande

From Radio Diaries | Part of the Teenage Diaries series | 24:32

Juan crossed the Rio Grande illegally into Texas four years before he first recorded with Radio Diaries. At the time of his original diary, Juan and his family lived in a poor community just this side of the US-Mexican border.

This story is part of the Teenage Diaries series produced by Radio Diaries for NPR.

*Podcast with Juan's Teenage Diary also included.

Juan_small Juan and his family crossed the Rio Grande illegally into Texas four years ago. Now they live in a poor community just this side of the US-Mexican border.

This story is part of the  Teenage Diaries series  produced by Radio Diaries for NPR. Since 1996, Executive Producer Joe Richman has been giving tape recorders to young people around the country to document their lives. In December of 2012, Radio Diaries will revisit five of the original diarists 16 years after their first recordings. The series airs on NPR’s  All Things Considered    

Segregation Now, Segregation Forever: The Infamous Words of George Wallace

From Radio Diaries | Part of the Audio History Project series | 10:23

On the 50th anniversary of Wallace’s inaugural speech as the Governor of Alabama, Radio Diaries tells the story behind those infamous words, and the man who delivered them.

Wallace_t_small

It was just a single line in an inauguration speech given 50 years ago. But Alabama Governor George Wallace’s ‘Segregation Now, Segregation Tomorrow, Segregation Forever’ is remembered as one of the most vehement rallying cries against racial equality in American history.
 
The year was 1963. Civil rights activists were fighting for equal access to schools and the voting booth, and the federal government was preparing to intervene in many southern states. In Montgomery, Alabama, newly elected governor George Wallace stepped up to a podium to deliver his inaugural address.
 
On the speech’s fiftieth anniversary, Radio Diaries looks back at the story behind those famous words, and the man who delivered them.
 
In his later years, George Wallace embarked on an apology tour, paying amends to civil rights activists and appearing in black churches to ask forgiveness. In his last election as governor of Alabama, in 1982, he won with more than ninety percent of the black vote.
 
This story is part of our Audio History Project and was produced by Samara Freemark, with help from Joe Richman, Sarah Kramer, Ben Shapiro, Nellie Gilles, and edited by Deborah George.

Josh's Diary, Part 2: First Kiss

From Radio Diaries | Part of the Teenage Diaries series | 18:11

In Josh's second diary, he packs his tape recorder for his first summer away from home. "What I have here is an envelope on which this girl Nicole wrote down instructions on how to kiss. It says: 'pucker lips, slowly open mouth, slowly slide tongue in, repeat steps 1, 2, and 3.' She made that list for me because I made out with her and she said I was doing it wrong. So I guess that's the main thing I learned this summer."

This story is part of the Teenage Diaries series produced by Radio Diaries for NPR.

Td_josh_002_l_small In Josh's second diary, he packs his tape recorder for his first summer away from home. "What I have here is an envelope on which this girl Nicole wrote down instructions on how to kiss. It says: 'pucker lips, slowly open mouth, slowly slide tongue in, repeat steps 1, 2, and 3.' She made that list for me because I made out with her and she said I was doing it wrong. So I guess that's the main thing I learned this summer."

This story is part of the Teenage Diaries series produced by Radio Diaries for NPR. Since 1996, Executive Producer Joe Richman has been giving tape recorders to young people around the country to document their lives. 

Juan's Diary, Part 2: Back to Mexico

From Radio Diaries | Part of the Teenage Diaries series | 25:51

In Juan’s second audio diary, he travels back to Mexico to visit his dying grandfather. This is his first time back since he immigrated to the United States.

“I search in my pockets and I find, you know, some money and I say, ‘Well, you know, now I can help out, you know.’ And he just laugh. And I say, ‘Why are you laughing?’ He says, ‘Well, I never expect you to give me some money, ’cause it’s like it was yesterday when you were a kid, and everything.’ And then, I still remember the smile on his face. He kept saying that he was proud of me. He was proud, you know?”

Juan first recorded his audio diary with us 16 years ago. In a recent podcast, we hear from Juan today as he reflects back on his life now and the past 16 years.

This story is part of the Teenage Diaries series produced by Radio Diaries for NPR.

Td_juan_003_l_small

In Juan’s second audio diary, he travels back to Mexico to visit his dying grandfather. This is his first time back since he immigrated to the United States.

“I search in my pockets and I find, you know, some money and I say, ‘Well, you know, now I can help out, you know.’ And he just laugh. And I say, ‘Why are you laughing?’ He says, ‘Well, I never expect you to give me some money, ’cause it’s like it was yesterday when you were a kid, and everything.’ And then, I still remember the smile on his face. He kept saying that he was proud of me. He was proud, you know?”

This story is part of the  Teenage Diaries series  produced by Radio Diaries for NPR. Since 1996, Executive Producer Joe Richman has been giving tape recorders to young people around the country to document their lives. In December of 2012, Radio Diaries will revisit five of the original diarists 16 years after their first recordings. The series airs on NPR’s  All Things Considered  

 

Miss Subways

From Radio Diaries | Part of the Audio History Project series | 08:26

Beauty pageants promote the fantasy of the ideal woman. But for 35 years, the Miss Subways contest in New York City celebrated the everyday working girl.

Subway_003_t_small

Beauty pageants promote the fantasy of the ideal woman. But for 35 years, one contest in New York City celebrated the everyday working girl.

Each month starting in 1941, a young woman was elected “Miss Subways,” and her face gazed down on transit riders as they rode through the city. Her photo was accompanied by a short bio describing her hopes, dreams and aspirations. The public got to choose the winners – so Miss Subway represented the perfect New York miss. She was also a barometer of changing times.

Miss Subways was one of the the first integrated beauty pageants in America. An African-American Miss Subways was selected in 1948 – more than thirty years before there was a black Miss America. By the 1950s there were Miss Subways who were black, Asian, Jewish, and Hispanic – the faces of New York’s female commuters.

Meet the Miss Subways in this radio story, produced by Samara Freemark.

Episode 1: Introductions

From WXAV 88.3FM | 26:56

On the first episode of Veteran Matters, host Peter Hilton introduces the Veterans that will be on the next four episodes of Veteran Matters and the themes of each episode. The veterans also discuss why they enlisted in the service, and where they served.

Veteranmatters_small On the first episode of Veteran Matters, host Peter Hilton introduces the Veterans that will be on the next four episodes of Veteran Matters and the themes of each episode. The veterans also discuss why they enlisted in the service, and where they served.

Shelf Discovery: Above Suspicion by Helen MacInnes

From Kristin Dreyer Kramer | Part of the Shelf Discovery series | 03:00

On this week's Shelf Discovery, Kristin sets out on a classic spy mission with the 1941 thriller Above Suspicion by Helen MacInnes.

Sdpic_cropped_small Each week on Shelf Discovery, host Kristin Dreyer Kamer offers listeners a brief look inside the pages of a new book. From mysteries to memoirs, classics to chick lit, busy readers are sure to find plenty of picks to add to their shelves. On this week's show, Kristin sets out on a classic spy mission with the 1941 thriller Above Suspicion by Helen MacInnes.

Charles Mingus

From KUT | Part of the KUTX Liner Notes series | 02:38

Charles Mingus is considered one of the most creative and original voices in American jazz. Uniquely sensitive to the plight of the dispossessed, he challenged his musical ensembles to be improvisatory acts of collective inspiration — responding to the matters of the moment.

Playing
Charles Mingus
From
KUT

Mingus_small The music that Mingus wrote was rooted in standard musical forms and grounded in the blues, yet he challenged these conventions with new perspectives and unorthodox juxtapositions, encouraging his bands to do the same. In this short feature Rabbi Neil Blumofe examines at how interpretation of these forms in performance might bring about the transformation of a musician, a listener, and potentially, the world.

Turkey Party

From Brian Bahouth | Part of the Short Audio Fiction series | 13:06

A trendy catering idea lurches off the ground in this thoughtfully contemporary short story first published in the literary magazine 971 Menu. Written and produced by Brian Bahouth.

Turkey-party-prx_small A trendy catering idea lurches off the ground in this thoughtfully contemporary short story first published in the literary magazine 971 Menu. Written and produced by Brian Bahouth.

Ambrosia

From Brian Bahouth | Part of the Short Audio Fiction series | 06:40

This poignant, sound rich short story is set near Lake Tahoe and was first published in the literary magazine Prime Number. Written and produced by Brian Bahouth.

Playing
Ambrosia
From
Brian Bahouth

Ambrosia-prx_small This poignant, sound rich short story is set near Lake Tahoe and was first published in the literary magazine Prime Number. Written and produced by Brian Bahouth.

Gonzo Starion

From Brian Bahouth | Part of the Short Audio Fiction series | 07:19

Gonzo Station is a sound rich short short story set on an aircraft carrier stationed in the Indian Ocean. Written and produced by Brian Bahouth and first published in Chamber Four literary magazine.

Gonzo-prx_small Gonzo Station is a sound rich short short story set on an aircraft carrier stationed in the Indian Ocean. Written and produced by Brian Bahouth and first published in Chamber Four literary magazine.

India's Shifting Gender Roles: One Girl's Tale

From Rhitu Chatterjee | 11:03

India has come under close scrutiny lately for its poor treatment of women and girls. Yet, this is a time when a growing number of women are enjoying unprecedented opportunities. More and more women are getting educated and joining the work force. So how are girls and women in the country seeing themselves and their future? To find out, The World's Rhitu Chatterjee spent some time with one girl in a remote corner of the country. (Multimedia elements available for embedding at http://www.theworld.org/2013/03/indias-shifting-gender-roles-one-girls-tale/)

Sarita_prx_medium_small

The recent gang rape and murder of a 23-year-old physiotherapy student in the Indian capital of New Delhi sparked unprecedented demonstrations across the country. It also fueled discussions about the status of women in India. But the recent spike in violence against women also parallels an increase in the number of women in public spaces, a fact that reflects the changing role of women in the society.

These changes have even trickled down to some of the remotest and most conservative parts of India.

But how do these changes play out in an individual’s life? How do old and new ways interact and clash in a family, and in a community? And who and what helps a girl learn what is expected of her what she can and cannot do?

The World’s Rhitu Chatterjee answers some of these questions through a look at the life of 12 year-old Sarita Meena, who lives in a remote village in Northwestern India.

Sarita looks like a boy. She is skinny, and wears her hair very short. People in the village call her father's son. In a region, where most girls and women are quiet and shy with strangers, Sarita never hesitates to strike up a conversation. She is fearless, outspoken and likes hanging out with the boys at school.

She is the youngest of three daughters. Her two older sisters live in a small town an hour away and are among the first girls to leave the village for higher studies. Sarita wants to follow in her sisters’ footsteps and eventually get a job teaching school kids.

But she is also a dutiful, obedient daughter. She is eager to help her mother with housework and help her father on his farm. She worries about who will look after her parents once she and her sisters are married and living with their in-laws.

The contradictions in Sarita’s personality reflect a larger reality in Indian society. As women have more and more opportunities, they  have to decide for themselves how much they want to push back against tradition.

This story takes a close look at how one young girl is making those decisions and choices, and why. 

Brandon and His Meds

From Jamie Courville | 02:58

After living with HIV for many years, Brandon recently had to start taking medication. He has advice for those who are in the same boat.

Brandon passed away November 9, 2012.

Dsc_5567_small After living with HIV for many years, Brandon recently had to start taking medication. He has advice for those who are in the same boat. Brandon passed away November 9, 2012.

Corn Mo Portrait

From Jamie Courville | 03:59

Corn Mo has had an amazing career as a performer but still continues to fly under the radar.

Corn_mo_small Corn Mo has had an amazing career as a performer but still continues to fly under the radar.