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Playlist: SPECIALS

Compiled By: Maureen McMurray

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DEBATE: Will Video Games Make Us Smarter?

From Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates | Part of the Intelligence Squared U.S. series | 54:00

As video games gain prominence, some game creators are turning to global issues, such as poverty alleviation, international diplomacy, and combating climate change, for inspiration. Will video games soon provide innovative solutions to our most pressing social, political and economic challenges? Or is the impact of gaming overrated and potentially destructive? With Daphne Bavelier, Elias Aboujaoude, Asi Burak, and Walter R. Boot.

Videogamesdebate_0_small As video games gain prominence, some game creators are turning to global issues, such as poverty alleviation, international diplomacy, and combating climate change, for inspiration. Playing these socially minded games, they argue, allows users to build tangible skills in combating crisis and solving critical problems. But others see the multibillion-dollar gaming industry, dominated by portrayals of crime and war, as a threat that desensitizes its users to violence and encourages anti-social behavior.  Will video games soon provide innovative solutions to our most pressing social, political and economic challenges?  Or is the impact of gaming overrated and potentially destructive?

MOTION
Video Games Will Make Us Smarter

PANELISTS

FOR

 

Daphne Bavelier, Professor of Brain and Cognitive Science, University of Geneva & Co-Founding Advisor, Akili Interactive; Asi Burak, Chairman, Games for Change & CEO, Power Play

 
AGAINST

 

Elias Aboujaoude, Director, Stanford University OCD and Impulse Control Disorders Clinics & Author, Virtually You; Walter R. Boot, Director, Florida State University Attention and Training Lab

HV018- Stars and Bars

From Hearing Voices | Part of the Hearing Voices series | 54:00

Celebrating America with flags, fireworks and summer festivals, featuring recitations and reflections on The Pledge” of Allegiance, the annual Rainbow Family migration into the forest on July Fourth, a town that covets their title of the “Armpit of America”, and Mississippi moonshine, barbecued goat and old-time Fife & Drum at Otha Turner’s Afrosippi Picnic.

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Host: Larry Massett of HearingVoices.com

Celebrating America with Flags and Festivals, featuring:

Recitations and reflections on “The Pledge” of Allegiance” and “War vs. Peace” (by Joe Frank).

The annual “Rainbow Family” migration into the Montana forest on July Fourth — their day of prayer for peace (produced by Barrett Golding, photos by Chad Harder).

A town that covets their title of the “Armpit of America” — host Larry Massett welcomes you to Battle Mountain, Nevada.

Mississippi moonshine, barbecued goat and old-time Fife & Drum at “Otha Turner’s Afrosippi Picnic” with producer Ben Adair.

HV011- Road Trip

From Hearing Voices | Part of the Hearing Voices series | 54:00

International travelers’ tales of touring the Republic of Georgia with ex-KGB friend of a friend, a cross-country hitchhiking expedition, and travel tunes and stories from the bands Lemon Jelly and Richmond Fontaine.

011roadtrip200_small This is an episode in the series Hearing Voices from NPR now being offered as a standalone special.

Host: Larry Massett of Hearing Voices

Summary: Host Larry Massett spends a "Long Day on the Road" with ex-KGB in the Republic of Georgia. Scott Carrier starts in Salt Lake and ends on the Atlantic in this cross-country "Hitchhike." Lemon Jelly adds beats to the life of a "Ramblin' Man." The band Richmond Fontaine sends musical postcards from the flight of "Walter On the Lam." And Mark Allen tells a tale of a tryst with a "Kinko's Crackhead."

Listener info and links:
http://hearingvoices.com/news/2009/05/hv011-road-trip/

0:15 On-Air Promo Text: This week on Hearing Voices: "Road Trip," Travelers’ Tales, it's a Road Trip, with ex-KGB in the Republic of Georgia, and a cross-county hitchhike.

Bridge For Sale: Deception In America [rebroadcast]

From BackStory with the American History Guys | Part of the BackStory with the American History Guys: Full Episodes series | 54:00

America has a long and colorful history of confidence men and counterfeiters. On this episode of BackStory, we go back to the time when fake money and fly-by-night banks dominated the economy, and uncover the origins of the lie detector test, known as “the truth compelling machine.” We’ll also try to sell you the Brooklyn Bridge.

Feejee-mermaid-600x343_small America has a long and colorful history of confidence men and counterfeiters. On this episode of BackStory, we go back to the time when fake money and fly-by-night banks dominated the economy, and uncover the origins of the lie detector test, known as “the truth compelling machine.” We’ll also try to sell you the Brooklyn Bridge.

Banned: A History of Censorship [rebroadcast]

From BackStory with the American History Guys | Part of the BackStory with the American History Guys: Full Episodes series | 54:00

Americans have sought to censor all kinds of expression: political speech, music, radio, TV, film, even books. In this episode, Peter, Ed, and Brian mark the annual Banned Books Week with an uncut account of censorship in American politics, media, and culture. We look at efforts to prevent the discussion of controversial subjects from slavery to sex, Hollywood’s production code and how the line between free speech and censorship has changed over time.

Censorship_small Americans have sought to censor all kinds of expression: political speech, music, radio, TV, film, even books. In this episode, Peter, Ed, and Brian mark the annual Banned Books Week with an uncut account of censorship in American politics, media, and culture. We look at efforts to prevent the discussion of controversial subjects from slavery to sex, Hollywood’s production code and how the line between free speech and censorship has changed over time.

Sound Opinions Remembers Chuck Berry

From Sound Opinions | Part of the Sound Opinions Specials series | 59:00

Chuck Berry, one of the architects of rock ‘n’ roll, died on March 18, 2017 at age 90. Hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot reflect on the life, music, and enduring legacy of the legendary guitarist, lyricist, and singer.

Chuckberry_web_small Chuck Berry died on March 18th at the age of 90. Jim and Greg celebrate the life of Berry by looking at his iconic tracks, as well as his vast influence on future artists. They also talk about his work in later years and what it was like to share a stage with the guitar legend.

Sound Opinions Presents: 1967 – Rock & Roll Comes of Age

From Sound Opinions | Part of the Sound Opinions Specials series | 59:00

In this FREE, EVERGREEN one-hour program, Sound Opinions celebrates one of the most significant years in rock and roll. 1967 was the year that the recording studio as an instrument changed the way music is created; that the album as a united concept changed the way it is heard; that the festival experience remade the way music is celebrated live. Pop music became big business.

1967_logo_square_small If rock and roll was born in the 1950s, then by 1967-for better or worse-it had grown up. Sound Opinions celebrates this influential year in a one hour special: 1967: Rock & Roll Comes of Age.  Perhaps no year saw more pivotal changes that continue to resonate today. 1967 was the year that the recording studio as an instrument changed the way music is created; that the album as a united concept changed the way it is heard; that the festival experience remade the way music is celebrated live. Pop music became big business.

Tune in as Sound Opinions hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot explore landmark releases by The Beatles, Pink Floyd, Love and the Velvet Underground. Out went the teen-driven single...in came the album as art. They also look back at the historic Monterey International Pop Festival-a coming out party for Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and Otis Redding that said to the world, "Rock and roll is here to stay." It's two renowned critics talking about one of the most important years in music. Guests include Elektra Records founder Jac Holzman, British invasion producer Joe Boyd and Monterey historian Harvey Kubernick.

So whether you are a casual music fan who remembers this era fondly, or an underground maven who wants to understand where it all started, join us for 1967: Rock & Roll Comes of Age.

This Sound Opinions EVERGREEN special is available free to all stations with current PRX memberships, even if they aren't signed up to get the show weekly. Learn how to get the show weekly at prx.org/soundopinions.


Sound Opinions Presents: Music of the Civil Rights Movement

From Sound Opinions | Part of the Sound Opinions Specials series | 54:00

Sound Opinions explores the music of the Civil Rights Era. From Bob Dylan to Odetta to the Staples Singers, hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot remark upon the impact music made on the fight for civil rights in the 1960s.

Mlk_small Professional music critics Jim and Greg discuss influential and game-changning music from the 1960s that provided a soundtrack to the civil rights movement. They analyze tracks by artists like Sam Cooke, The Staple Singers, Bob Dylan, Nina Simone and more. They also chat with former Chicago WVON DJ Herb Kent.

Sound Opinions Remembers David Bowie

From Sound Opinions | Part of the Sound Opinions Specials series | 59:00

This is your quintessential hour on rock's famous chameleon David Bowie. Hosts and critics Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot explore Bowie's long career and its musical highlights. Included are excerpts with legendary producers and Bowie collaborators Brian Eno and Tony Visconti.

Bowie_small This is your quintessential hour on rock's famous chameleon David Bowie. Hosts and critics Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot explore Bowie's long career and its musical highlights. Included are excerpts with legendary producers and Bowie collaborators Brian Eno and Tony Visconti.

Poison

From WHYY | Part of the The Pulse Specials series | 50:29

What’s in your backyard, in your water, in your food? The Pulse hunts for the hidden poisons in the environment and finds them everywhere — even in our medical treatments. In Alabama residents say an expanding landfill threats their way of life. Out West, we profile a toxic plant that’s killing big game. The show ends with a history lesson: a government researcher who intentionally poisoned people to ultimately make food safer for the rest of us.

Playing
Poison
From
WHYY

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Program Details:

Alabama landowners seek environmental justice

Ashurst Bar/Smith in central Alabama is a longtime mostly African American community. Landowners there have been fighting a municipal landfill since the 1990s. They say the dump has brought not just household trash, but stench, traffic, and worries about water pollution to the area. And that, they say, has devalued their land and their quality of life. Irina Zhorov speaks with residents who’ve asked the local government, the state, and the EPA for help — without satisfaction.

Spate of animal deaths may come down to yew

A drop dead gorgeous shrub is killing big game in the Rocky Mountain West. Hunting and wildlife watching is big business in Iowa and Montana, but there’s nothing like a giant carcass to create distrust in the quality of wildlife and the local ecosystem. Brie Ripley profiles the prime suspect, a plant native to Asia and a favorite in American backyards.

Holy Water: reclaiming a Jewish ritual

Since ancient times, Jewish women have immersed themselves in a ritual bath each month to mark the end of menstruation. Today, some cancer survivors are looking to the mikvah for a very different reason: spiritual cleansing after toxic chemotherapy. Abigail Holtzman joins Rachell Goldberg as she prepares her body for the most meaningful immersion of her life.

Mr. Yuk’s origin story

A scowling-faced sticker was born to help panicked parents when their kids sip that delicious-looking, apple-green dish detergent. Margaret J. Krauss speaks with the Pittsburgh Poison Center’s medical director.

The Poison Squad boys voluntarily ate tainted chipped beef

In the early 1900s, a government chemist used some very unorthodox — and perhaps ruthless — methods in his quest to make America’s food supply safer. Sruthi Pinnamaneni leads the history lesson.

Interviews with host Maiken Scott

Both poison and cure

Chemotherapy, the suite of drugs used to treat cancer, can come at a big cost: nausea, hair loss, heart problems, and, in some cases, additional cancers years later. Oncologist and American Cancer Society Chief Medical Officer Otis Brawley explains how he and his patients weigh the benefits with the potential harm.

Go organic or choose conventional?

Grocery shopping is full of decision-making. But perhaps no aisle of the supermarket is more fraught with choices than the produce aisle. There's local, organic, and conventional to choose from when you select your zucchini, blueberries and carrots. Each one carries a price, and some have traces of pesticide remaining from the growing process. One shopper and one scientist give us their opinion on what’s best.