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Playlist: Music

Compiled By: Lisa Tinsley

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A Bad Rap: Brad Paisley and L.L. Cool J’s “Accidental Racist”

From New Visions, New Voices | Part of the My Mic is Hot with Michael Eric Dyson series | 03:59

In Brad Paisley and L.L. Cool J's recent collabo, "Accidental Racist," a sophisticated understanding of history and race is the ultimate casualty.

Brad-llcoolj_small Country music singer Brad Paisley and hip-hop legend L.L. Cool J sparked a firestorm of controversy after the release of their collaboration, “Accidental Racist.” The song features noteworthy lyrics from both Paisley and L.L., including the rapper’s line, “If you don’t judge my gold chains, I’ll forget the iron chains.” While the motivation for the partnership between Paisley and L.L. may be admirable, says Dyson, what’s lacking is a sophisticated understanding of history and race.

HOB Radio: Missy Andersen

From Ben Manilla | Part of the House of Blues Radio Hour series | 59:00

Missy Andersen keeps old school Soul and R&B alive!

Missyandersen_photo03_small The House of Blues Radio Hour is a weekly syndicated program hosted by Elwood Blues (a.k.a. Dan Aykroyd).  In this episode, Elwood is joined by soul singer Missy Andersen, whose self-titled debut album takes a fresh approach to the classic R&B sounds of the 60's.  Includes music by Etta James, James Brown, Aretha Franklin, Sharon Jones, and more.

HOB Radio: Jimi Hendrix, West Coast Seattle Boy

From Ben Manilla | Part of the House of Blues Radio Hour series | 59:01

Elwood celebrates the new Hendrix anthology

6293954_tml_small The House of Blues Radio Hour is a weekly syndicated program hosted by Elwood Blues (a.k.a. Dan Aykroyd).  In this episode, Elwood features previously un-released recordings from Jimi Hendrix, part of the new four CD box set, West Coast Seattle Boy.  Includes rare interview footage with Jimi Hendrix himself, as well as clips from his sister Janie and author John McDermott. And of course, tons of great music!

HOB Radio: Valleys Of Neptune, A Tribute To Jimi Hendrix

From Ben Manilla | Part of the House of Blues Radio Hour series | 59:01

An exclusive look at the new Jimi Hendrix album, "Valleys Of Neptune"

Jimi-hendrix_small The House of Blues Radio Hour is a weekly syndicated program hosted by Elwood Blues (a.k.a. Dan Aykroyd).  In this episode, Elwood takes an exclusive look at the new album of never-before-heard Jimi Hendrix studio recordings, Valleys Of Neptune.  Includes an interview with Jimi's sister, Janie Hendrix.

HOB Radio: Jimi Hendrix, "Valleys Of Neptune"

From Ben Manilla | Part of the House of Blues Radio Hour series | 59:00

An exclusive look at the new Jimi Hendrix album, "Valleys Of Neptune"

Jimi_hendrix_-_valleys_of_neptune240w_small The House of Blues Radio Hour is a weekly syndicated program hosted by Elwood Blues (a.k.a. Dan Aykroyd).  In this episode, Elwood takes an exclusive look at the new album of never-before-heard Jimi Hendrix studio recordings, Valleys Of Neptune.  Includes an interview with Jimi's sister, Janie Hendrix. 

HOB Radio: Robert Randolph

From Ben Manilla | Part of the House of Blues Radio Hour series | 59:01

The young pedal-steel master has a new album produced by T-Bone Burnett

Medium_robert-randolph-revival_small The House of Blues Radio Hour is a weekly syndicated program hosted by Elwood Blues (a.k.a. Dan Aykroyd).  In this episode, Elwood sits down with young Robert Randolph to talk about the new record, We Walk This Road produced by T-Bone Burnett, and the roots of its sound in the sacred steel tradition of the Pentacostal church.

HOB Radio: Tribute To The Mississippi Sheiks

From Ben Manilla | Part of the House of Blues Radio Hour series | 59:00

A tribute to the legacy and influence of the 1930’s band, the Mississippi Sheiks.

277006_small The House of Blues Radio Hour is a weekly syndicated program hosted by Elwood Blues (a.k.a. Dan Aykroyd).  In this episode, Elwood sits down with Steve Dawson, producer of Things About Comin' My Way, a new tribute album and DVD dedicated to the music of the influential 1930's band, the Mississippi SheiksIncludes music by Jack White, the North Mississippi Allstars, Howlin' Wolf, John Hammond, and more.

HOB Radio: Buckwheat Zydeco

From Ben Manilla | Part of the House of Blues Radio Hour series | 59:01

The crème de la crème of shake-your-moneymaker Louisiana funk!

Buckwheatzydeco-smaller-and-cropped_small The House of Blues Radio Hour is a weekly syndicated program hosted by Elwood Blues (a.k.a. Dan Aykroyd).  In this episode, Elwood talks with Buckwheat Zydeco about his new album, "Lay Your Burden Down" and his unique blend of R&B and traditional Louisiana Zydeco. 

HOB Radio: Chicago Blues

From Ben Manilla | Part of the House of Blues Radio Hour series | 59:00

Where the blues went electric! A tribute to Chicago Blues.

Chicago1_small The House of Blues Radio Hour is a weekly syndicated program hosted by Elwood Blues (a.k.a. Dan Aykroyd).  In this episode, Elwood is your guide to Chicago Blues; past, present, and future!  Includes music by Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf, Nick Moss, and more.

Still Singing the Blues: New Orleans and South Louisiana

From Richard Ziglar | Part of the Still Singing the Blues series | 55:00

Still Singing the Blues: New Orleans and South Louisiana features musicians in New Orleans and South Louisiana who continue to perform the blues—often despite poverty, ill health, and the impacts of natural disasters like Hurricane Katrina. We have included two versions, one with a billboard and one without a billboard. The billboard version is 55 minutes long. The one without the billboard is 53 minutes and 59 seconds long. Timing and cues are given for the billboard version.

Franprx_small Still Singing the Blues features musicians in New Orleans and South Louisiana who continue to perform both traditional blues and rhythm-and-blues—often despite poverty, ill health, and the impacts of natural disasters like Hurricane Katrina. The hour-long, music-rich documentary burrows into the lives of three outstanding older performers: Carol Fran of Lafayette, Harvey Knox of Baton Rouge, and Little Freddie King of New Orleans. Listeners will travel with these musicians to recording sessions, street corners, birthday celebrations, and neighborhood taverns.

Also interviewed are blues pianist and singer Marcia Ball; blues-and-funk guitarist Ernie Vincent; and Bethany Bultman, president of the New Orleans Musicians Clinic.

Producers Richard Ziglar and Barry Yeoman have been interviewing older Southern blues and R&B musicians for the past 18 months. Their last documentary, Truckin' My Blues Away, was commissioned and distributed by AARP's Prime Time Radio and broadcast on 325 stations. The current, independently-produced project, Still Singing the Blues, is sponsored by Filmmakers Collaborative and funded, in part, by a generous grant from the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities, a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Accompanying this documentary is a web site, http://stillsingingtheblues.org, which features additional audio clips, photographs, a blog, and links for readers who want to obtain CDs, find music venues, and learn more about non-profit organizations that promote Louisiana's music and support its musicians. The producers will add audio and photos to the site throughout the coming year.

Project director Richard Ziglar is an audio documentarian whose credits include Oprah Winfrey’s Harpo Productions; AARP’s Prime Time Radio; American Public Media’s “The Story”; and the North Carolina Arts Council. Reporter Barry Yeoman, a former Louisianan, is a freelance journalist who writes for O, The Oprah Magazine; AARP The Magazine; Audubon Magazine; and Good Housekeeping. His radio program Picking Up the Pieces, about the parents of injured veterans, won the 2009 Gracie Allen award for outstanding mid-length documentary. Ziglar and Yeoman can be reached at info@stillsingingtheblues.org.

This is the first of a two-part series about the blues in New Orleans and South Louisiana. Part 2 will be released later this summer, but the two hours can be broadcast separately and independently. 

Blue Dimensions F18: Jazz from the South Side, rising star jazz pianist Alexis Lombre

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Music and conversation with Chicago jazz pianist Alexis Lombre whose debut album "Southside Sounds" came out this year.

Lombre_small Blue Dimensions F18 Has Been Published on PRX:  In this hour of Blue Dimensions, music from a rising star, 20-year-old pianist Alexis Lombre from Chicago. We'll hear songs from her debut album "Southside Sounds", informed by her experience as a teenager playing jazz, and from a 2016 album "Coming Of Age" with a band she played in, The Young Masters Quartet, a group of young musicians mentored by Chicago saxophonist and "jazz activist" Ernest Dawkins - - and, we'll talk with Alexis - - about her music, playing jazz with and for young people, and living in Chicago on the South Side. Alexis also named some of her favorite pianists and greatest influences, and we'll hear music from some of them, including Wynton Kelly, and the player she calls her "samurai" pianist, McCoy Tyner. Music and conversation with pianist Alexis Lombre, in this hour of Blue Dimensions.

promo included: Promo-F18

Blue Fimensions F19: Nicholas Payton's Afro-Caribbean Mixtape

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

featuring Nicholas Payton's new album "Afro-Caribbean Mixtape" along with new Afro-Caribbean sounds from Trombone Shorty, blues from Taj Mahal and Keb' Mo' and more

Payton_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions - - trumpeter Nicholas Payton came of age in the time of mixtapes on cassettes, and has entitled his new album "Afro-Caribbean MixTape." It's a mix of rhythms and textures from the African diaspora in the Caribbean region, the northernmost part of which, says Payton is his native New Orleans. We'll also check out Payton in a band led by Kevin Eubanks, on Eubanks's new album "East West Time Line," and also from New Orleans, we have new music from Trombone Shorty, who, much like Payton, draws on Afro-Caribbean rhythms while updating the Crescent City's brass band tradition. We'll hear new blues that carries social commentary from John Primer and Bob Corritore, and from Taj Mahal and Keb' Mo', and a bluesy jazz nocturne from pianist Alexis Lombre, a rising star on Chicago's jazz scene, from her debut album "Southside Sounds."

promo included: promo-F19

Rumba and the radio

From KALW | Part of the Crosscurrents series | 07:00

If you happen to walk by the Radio Habana Social Club on Valencia Street on a Sunday afternoon, you might hear Rumba, the music of Cuba. Radio Habana is a place where neighbors and old friends have been coming for over a decade to talk politics and music over plates of frijoles. It’s a piece of Cuba in San Francisco--and a place where some people recognize the Mission they used to know.

Playing
Rumba and the radio
From
KALW

Rumbapic_small If you happen to walk by the Radio Habana Social Club on Valencia Street on a Sunday afternoon, you might hear Rumba, the music of Cuba. Radio Habana is a place where neighbors and old friends have been coming for over a decade to talk politics and music over plates of frijoles. It’s a piece of Cuba in San Francisco--and a place where some people recognize the Mission they used to know.

John Coltrane’s “Offering: Live at Temple University”

From Mark Gunnery | 04:58

Marc Steiner Show producer Mark Gunnery shares an appreciation and review of the latest John Coltrane release, Offering: Live at Temple University. The recording documents one of Coltrane’s final concerts on November 11, 1966, and offers a glimpse of where he was heading musically in the final months of his life.

Coltranegunnery_small

Marc Steiner Show producer Mark Gunnery shares an appreciation and review of the latest John Coltrane release, Offering: Live at Temple University. The recording documents one of Coltrane’s final concerts on November 11, 1966, and offers a glimpse of where he was heading musically in the final months of his life.

“Naima”

In November of 1966, John Coltrane was at a creative turning point. He was breaking new ground in jazz, making challenging music that would divide his fans. Constantly practicing, he pushed his saxophone to the edges of its register. Coltrane was studying music from around the world, including African drumming, Indian ragas, and European composers like Stravinsky. He was deeply engaged in Hindu, Buddhist and African spiritual practice, and experimenting with LSD. All these elements converge in the recently released album, Offering: Live at Temple University. It captures one of Coltrane’s last concerts. Just seven months later, he would pass away at the age of forty.

The quartet that recorded such classic albums as Crescent,  A Love Supreme, and Live At the Village Vanguard disbanded in 1965, and Coltrane was playing with a quintet that included pianist Alice Coltrane. Rashied Ali played drums, Pharaoh Sanders played tenor sax, and Sonny Johnson was on bass. The sound they created was big, resonant, and complicated. They were experimenting with free rhythm, and reinterpreting Coltrane standards in shocking new ways. Check out Alice Coltrane’s solo on the Rodgers and Hammerstein classic “My Favorite Things.”

“My Favorite Things”

Another addition to Coltrane’s band was a trio of percussionists playing congas, bata, and tambourines. Umar Ali, Algie DeWitt, and Robert Kenyatta were part of a twice weekly drum circle that met in a church near Coltrane’s house. They saw their drumming as a means of promoting African culture and building Black community in Philadelphia. Coltrane dropped in a few times with his saxophone and jammed. On the percussion solo on Leo, you can hear the trio playing with drummer Rashied Ali.

“Leo”

That was Coltrane singing. He sings and chants three times on this recording, sometimes beating on his chest to achieve a tremolo effect. His vocal performances are stunning, strange and surprising. And so his horn playing. Inspired by the avant-garde and free jazz of people like Sun Ra, Ornette Coleman, and Archie Shepp, Coltrane’s later work was, and is, controversial. Some people love the direction he took, and some can’t stand it. Village Voice jazz critic  Francis Davis attended the concert documented on Offering: Live at Temple University, and years later wrote that: “The walkouts began 15 minutes or so into the evening’s first tune . . . What was shocking about the exodus was that these were Coltrane addicts presumably undaunted by the turbulence and complexity of his music to that point, but grief-stricken by what they were hearing now . . . To many of Coltrane’s fans, including some who looked as though they wanted to leave but sat rigid with disbelief, this concert and others like it amounted to a breach of trust for which he still hasn’t been completely forgiven.”

“Crescent”

The music here is not always easy to listen to, but for Coltrane fans, it is a real gift to get a hint of the direction he and his band were heading in the last months of his life. The name of the album, Offering, is telling. This is an offering from John Coltrane. It’s not necessarily an easy offering to receive, but I’m grateful that he gave it to us. Offering: Live at Temple University is available from Resonance Records. For the Marc Steiner Show and WEAA 88.9 FM, the voice of the community, I’m Mark Gunnery.

“Offering”

City of Bloomington Celebrates Black History Month, Part 3

From WFHB | Part of the Standing Room Only series | 57:35

On February 4, music industry pioneer Logan Westbrooks spoke with the community about his work advancing black music and causes as a record executive for CBS. As one of the first black executives for a major music label, he was able to promote black artists and influence the music industry as whole.

Badge-wo-tagline_small On February 4, music industry pioneer Logan Westbrooks spoke with the community about his work advancing black music and causes as a record executive for CBS. As one of the first black executives for a major music label, he was able to promote black artists and influence the music industry as whole. Co-chair of the Black History Month Steering Committee William Hosea began this episode of Standing Room Only by introducing Ethnomusicology Professor Dr. Portia Maultsby so that she could introduce Logan Westrbooks for Standing Room Only on WFHB.

26: Gennett Records

From Everything Sounds | Part of the Everything Sounds series | 20:09

Indiana was a hotbed for KKK activity in the 1920's, but during that time Richmond was the home of a record label that helped pioneer the recording of jazz and blues music.

5_-_gennett_small The early recorded history of jazz, blues, and country music in America usually isn’t associated with a place like Richmond, Indiana. However, for a brief period early in the 20th century the Gennett record label based in Richmond recorded music from artists such as Gene Autry, Charley Patton, Blind Lemon Jefferson, and Hoagy Carmichael. Learn about the history of the label from Rick Kennedy, the author of Jelly Roll, Bix, and Hoagy.

Henry "Red" Allen

From Guy Rathbun | Part of the the Club McKenzie: Your 1920s Jazz Speakeasy series | 58:59

New Orleans musician who's work had a profound effect on the early development of jazz.

Red_small Henry "Red" Allen is one of the jazz immortals. He left New Orleans in the early 1920's. Allen's unique style provided direction for big band trumpet soloists and, and, in the 1960's, he became the elder statesman of jazz.  His early recordings influenced musicians of the 1930's.

Blues File: James Brown's Blues Recordings

From WXPN | Part of the Blues File series | 03:14

James Brown's blues recordings

Brownjblues_small The Godfather Of Soul, James Brown, will always be remembered more as the Founder Of Funk than a blues artist, but he made some great blues recordings-- some of which were hidden away as "deep" tracks on albums, some unissued for many years after being cut. This Blues File is a look at some of James Brown's blues.

"Going Black: The Legacy of Philly Soul Radio" Companion Pieces (Series)

Produced by Mighty Writers

Most recent piece in this series:

Jerry Blavat

From Mighty Writers | Part of the "Going Black: The Legacy of Philly Soul Radio" Companion Pieces series | 04:29

Jerry_blavat_small This is one of the short non-narrated pieces that are standalone companion pieces to the documentary special, "Going Black: The Legacy of Philly Soul Radio ." Starting in the 1950s, Black radio stations around the country became the pulse of African-American communities, and served as their megaphone during the Civil Rights and Black Power movements. A generation of Black disc jockeys across the nation rapped and rhymed on the radio and played the hippest records that you couldn't hear on mainstream radio. In Philadelphia, there were two Black radio stations at the far right end of the dial that had a sound you couldn't hear anywhere else: WDAS and WHAT.

Like with the documentary special, these sound-rich companion pieces explore the legacy of Black radio in Philadelphia — which is actually the story of Civil Rights, the story of Black music, and the story of how media has changed in the last century.

This installment in the series features Jerry Blavat, the Geator with the Heator. Early in his career, Blavat was a disc jockey at WHAT, one of the two Philadelphia Black AM radio stations at the far right end of the dial. Here, the Geator with the Heator, still rockin’ the big tick-tock today, talks about how he ended up in radio and the influence pioneering disc jockeys like Jocko and Georgie Woods had on his radio style.

The HipHop Chronicles

From Mike Middleton | 01:56:23

This is the HipHop Chronicles Mixtape featuring New and classic music from the best hip hop artist

Hhc_pic_1_small The Hip Hop Chronicles is a two-hour public radio program that blends hip hop culture, history, and current events with music from the 70's, 80's, 90’s, and NOW. The Hip Hop Chronicles offers two-hour programs on Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday each week. Monday and Wednesday programming is available upon request.

The HipHop Chronicles 10-25-16

From WEAA | Part of the HipHop Chronicles series | 01:53:09

In this edition of the Hip Hop Chronicles Mike Nyce highlights "And You Don't Stop Radio" with ChuckD, Wildman Steve and Flatline plus Rap Station news with Kylie Eustace and The Hip Hop Chronicles Old School Block party featuring classic hip hop from the 90's and early 2000's

Hhc_tuesday_small The Hip Hop Chronicles is a two-hour public radio program that blends hip hop culture, history, and current events with music from the 70's, 80's, 90’s, and NOW.

HipHop Chronicles (Series)

Produced by WEAA

Most recent piece in this series:

HipHop Chronicles (The BIG Story Edition)

From WEAA | Part of the HipHop Chronicles series | 01:56:49

Bigbrooklyn_small n this edition of the HipHopchronicles, we celebrate the Life, times and Rhymes of the Notorious BIG May 21, 1971 - March 9, 1997. Hear his story via music and documentaries.