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Playlist: MIKE

Compiled By: Luis Madrid

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Peak Phosphorous

From Generation Anthropocene | 12:00

Five things you may not know about phosphorus (but probably should): 1) It’s an essential element to all life on Earth – so it’s a critical ingredient for industrial fertilizers. 2) The vast majority of our phosphorus supply comes from phosphate rock, mined from geologic deposits. 3) Those geologic deposits are concentrated in just 5 countries, and Morocco alone controls 75% of known reserves. 4) The rate at which we’re consuming phosphorus is flat out unsustainable, to say the least. Experts warn that at current rates we may run out of it this century. 5) If all that weren’t enough, many commercial farms over-apply phosphorus-rich fertilizers, which has catastrophic consequences for freshwater and coastal ecosystems around the world. So, wow, right?! Who knew phosphorus was so important? And given that pretty much no one is talking about the issue of peak phosphorus, what are we going to do? Will we be able to better manage the world’s phosphorus supply before we run out and cause widespread environmental damage, all while continuing to feed the billions of people on the planet?

P-mine_small Five things you may not know about phosphorus (but probably should): 1) It’s an essential element to all life on Earth – so it’s a critical ingredient for industrial fertilizers. 2) The vast majority of our phosphorus supply comes from phosphate rock, mined from geologic deposits. 3) Those geologic deposits are concentrated in just 5 countries, and Morocco alone controls 75% of known reserves. 4) The rate at which we’re consuming phosphorus is flat out unsustainable, to say the least. Experts warn that at current rates we may run out of it this century. 5) If all that weren’t enough, many commercial farms over-apply phosphorus-rich fertilizers, which has catastrophic consequences for freshwater and coastal ecosystems around the world. So, wow, right?! Who knew phosphorus was so important? And given that pretty much no one is talking about the issue of peak phosphorus, what are we going to do? Will we be able to better manage the world’s phosphorus supply before we run out and cause widespread environmental damage, all while continuing to feed the billions of people on the planet?

Thanksgiving: From the Outside Looking In

From Syracuse University Broadcast Journalism | 05:52

Thanksgiving is the favorite holiday for many Americans, but what is it like for those who are from other countries and celebrate it too? This piece gives you a glimpse of how special American Thanksgiving is to foreigners.

Turkey_small Thanksgiving is the favorite holiday for many Americans, but what is it like for those who are from other countries and celebrate it too? This piece gives you a glimpse of how special American Thanksgiving is to foreigners.

Music and Noise

From Sheila Cowley | Part of the Resonance series | 11:00

Music-induced hearing loss and the shifting borders between noise and music.

Resonance_headphones_kid_color_small Hearing loss, tinnitus, iPods and earbuds are just part of the shifting borders between noise and music. In this sonically-complex piece, Joshua Hudelson explores the seductive dangers of what is now called "music-induced hearing loss."

Trauma Glossolalia: Synesthesia and Sound

From Sheila Cowley | Part of the Resonance series | 10:09

Award-winning composer Jenny Olivia Johnson explores synesthesia, where sound is perceived as color or touch. Her feature is a work of sound art as well as a compelling look at traumatic memories involving sound.

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Award-winning composer Jenny Olivia Johnson explores synesthesia, where sound is perceived as color or touch. Her feature is a work of sound art and a compelling look at traumatic memories involving sound. "In some ways sounds are the best witnesses. They can know more than we do." 
Listening to women relate stories where traumatic sounds are recalled as vivid color and sensation, Jenny finds that as a synaesthete herself, their painful stories sound disturbingly beautiful to her. 

Spoken Editions #205: Pigments, Vibrations, and Seismographic Bebop

From Ted Wells | Part of the Spoken Editions series | 08:01

Free, audio book excerpt. “Color is a power which directly influences the soul,” wrote Vasily Kandinsky, the Russian painter and theorist credited with creating the first entirely abstract painting over one hundred years ago.

Spokeneditions600x600podcasts_small Like other noted artists, from Vincent Van Gogh to Duke Ellington, Kandinsky had synesthesia—a neurological phenomenon that manifests by blending the senses. Some people with synesthesia experience certain colors in sound. Others, like Kandinsky, experience the reverse—they hear music and see it in color. Although the phenomenon varies from person to person, one thing remains constant—the synesthete experiences the world like very few others do—and this cross wiring of the senses sometimes makes for the creation of some extremely interesting art.

You Are How You Sound

From Hold That Thought | Part of the On Language series | 12:31

How may speech affect your perceived level of intelligence? Dr. John Baugh describes research that sheds light on linguistic profiling.

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Imagine that you're walking down the street and hear someone speaking with a British accent. What assumptions might you make about that person based on his or her voice? Would you come to the same conclusion if that person had a heavy southern drawl or sounded like he or she spoke Spanish as a first language? John Baugh , the Margaret Bush Wilson Professor in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, continues his discussion of linguistic profiling and describes how he hopes his research will lead to policies that increase Americans' acceptance of linguistic diversity.

To hear Baugh's personal story about how first became interested in this line of research, be sure to listen to Linguistic Insights , the first episode in our ongoing series about language.

The Music of Conversation

From Hold That Thought | 12:30

Even casual conversations have surprisingly musical qualities. Linguist Brett Hyde delves into the rhythms behind language and the principles that organize these patterns.

8336977597_f5862d05a5_b_small Whether or not you can play the drums or keep your body in rhythm out on the dance floor, if you're reading this sentence, you're participating in the unheard music of language. In his research at Washington University in St. Louis, linguist Brett Hyde , assistant professor of philosophy, delves into the rhythms behind everyday conversation. By studying the accent patterns of languages around the world, Hyde's goal is to discover the underlying principles that organize these patterns. Feel free to clap along as you hear about the connections between music, poetry, and the distinct beats of every sentence ever spoken.

#66 - Sit With Me

From SALTcast Podcast | 11:13

How can StoryCorps take their features to the next level? This Saltcast offers one example.

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I hope you're sitting down. I'm going to say something heretical. Ready?

I'm kinda tired of StoryCorps.

Let me explain. On so many levels, StoryCorps is genius. It's the nation's largest oral history project -- ever. And, it's peer to peer (mostly) with people interviewing one another. The stories are heartfelt and honest. What could be better on the radio, right?

Problem is, I think the stories are predictable. Not all the time, to be sure, but often.

On this Saltcast, we listen to a story produced at Salt several years ago that, in-house, we called "StoryCorps Plus." Take a listen and let us know if you think the approach to recording and producing this story might be a way for StoryCorps to take their productions to the next level.

# 74 - A Square Meal Regardless

From SALTcast Podcast | 10:15

How the heck do you find a story?! Check out a yard sale.

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“How the heck am I going to find a story?!” Students at Salt ask that question incessantly at the beginning of a semester. And trust me, they don’t always say ‘heck.’

To spark thinking on where to look for a story, for many years we’ve used “50 Places to Shop for Story Ideas” by Gregg McLachlan. I think it’s an excellent starting point.

One thing missing from the list? Yard sales.

Student Jen Nathan found today’s story, “A Square Meal Regardless,” while thumbing through the classified section of a newspaper (which is on the list, by the way).

Have a listen, check out the list, then add number 51 — yard sales.

Is the Earth really running out of water? A better way to measure water scarcity

From WTIP | Part of the The Roadhouse series | 19:12

We've all heard the Earth is running out of water... but how is that measured? Is there a better way to gauge water scarcity? Dr. Kate Brauman thinks so. She's lead scientist for the Global Water Initiative at the Institute on the Environment at the U of MN. She talked with WTIP's Dick Swanson about her ideas on more accurate and useful ways to determine water scarcity.

Roadhousesign_small We've all heard the Earth is running out of water... but how is that measured? Is there a better way to gauge water scarcity? Dr. Kate Brauman thinks so. She's lead scientist for the Global Water Initiative at the Institute on the Environment at the U of MN. She talked with WTIP's Dick Swanson about her ideas on more accurate and useful ways to determine water scarcity.

StoryCorps: Alicia Beltrán-Castañeda and Serena Castañeda

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 01:49

A mother tells her daughter about growing up in California in the late 1960s, and the lesson learned after her mother gave her beloved bed away.

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Alicia Beltrán-Castañeda grew up in Salinas, California, in the late 1960s. Her mother, Beatriz Béltran, was an immigrant from Mexico, and her father, Manuel, worked both as a foreman at a food packing plant and as an overseer of migrant farm workers.

Their family of seven lived in a small trailer, but by working multiple jobs, Manuel was able to save enough money to buy a plot of land on which he built a house. Alicia vividly recalls sitting on a 1950s metal stool in their living room, watching her father paint some of the walls goldenrod, and others Pepto-Bismol pink.

Manuel died when Alicia was 13, leaving their mother to raise the children alone.

Beatriz began working for the Salinas City Elementary School District as a bilingual liaison for Spanish-speaking families and the administration, and later became a coordinator for migrant worker families. Through her job, she saw the poverty many migrant families lived in.

Alicia was not as familiar with the lives of migrant farmworkers until she came home one day to find that her bed was missing--she was furious. With all of her older siblings away at college, Alicia had finally gotten her own room, and she loved her bed, which had a pink cover and lace dust ruffle. When she confronted her mother, Beatriz explained that she had given the bed to a family that had recently arrived in California from Mexico, and Alicia remembers telling her mother that she did not understanding why that was her problem. Without explanation, Beatriz told her to fill shopping bags with canned food from their pantry.

Together they drove to a house where Alicia’s bed now was, a one-room shack with a dirt floor like the ones occupied by so many other migrant worker families. There they met a woman who was laying on Alicia’s bed with her newborn baby surrounded by her four other children.

At StoryCorps, Alicia told her own daughter, Serena, 13, how meaningful that experience was for her.

Originally aired November 18, 2016, on NPR’s Morning Edition.

Our Fashion Footprint

From Generation Anthropocene | 18:44

A trendy outfit has never been cheaper than it is today. Not only that, the fashion industry is churning out new styles so quickly that the entire phenomenon has been dubbed fast fashion. The industry includes retailers like H&M, Forever 21, Zara, and even Target and Walmart. Of course, it’s only natural that we love finding the latest styles at affordable prices. But our clothes have abundant hidden costs for both the environment and people. This week, producer Leslie Chang takes a closer look at the footprint left behind by the fast-moving fashion industry. We hear from journalist Elizabeth Cline, author of ‘Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion,’ as well as UMass Dartmouth Asst. Prof. Nick Anguelov, author of ‘The Dirty Side of the Garment Industry: Fast Fashion and Its Negative Impact on Environment and Society.’

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A trendy outfit has never been cheaper than it is today. Not only that, the fashion industry is churning out new styles so quickly that the entire phenomenon has been dubbed fast fashion. The industry includes retailers like H&M, Forever 21, Zara, and even Target and Walmart. Of course, it’s only natural that we love finding the latest styles at affordable prices. But our clothes have abundant hidden costs for both the environment and people. This week, producer Leslie Chang takes a closer look at the footprint left behind by the fast-moving fashion industry. We hear from journalist Elizabeth Cline, author of ‘Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion,’ as well as UMass Dartmouth Asst. Prof. Nick Anguelov, author of ‘The Dirty Side of the Garment Industry: Fast Fashion and Its Negative Impact on Environment and Society.’

Brightening the Shadows of Dementia

From With Good Reason | Part of the news features series | 03:20

As we approach the shortest days of the year, we take a longing look at the therapeutic aspects of daylight. One researcher found that light therapy dramatically improved symptoms in patients with dementia.

Amos_arcticsun-940x626_small As we approach the shortest days of the year, we take a longing look at the therapeutic aspects of daylight. One researcher found that light therapy dramatically improved symptoms in patients with dementia.

Episode 1: We Are Stardust

From Public Radio Exchange (PRX) | Part of the Transistor series | 16:20

We're closer than ever before to discovering if we're not alone in the universe. The host for this episode of Transistor, astrophysicist Michelle Thaller, visits the NASA lab that discovered that comets contain some of the very same chemical elements that we contain. Then, Michelle talks to a Vatican planetary scientist about how science and religion can meet on the topic of life beyond Earth.

Michelle_thaller_headshot-1_small We're closer than ever before to discovering if we're not alone in the universe. The host for this episode of Transistor, astrophysicist Michelle Thaller, visits the NASA lab that discovered that comets contain some of the very same chemical elements that we contain. Then, Michelle talks to a Vatican planetary scientist about how science and religion can meet on the topic of life beyond Earth.

Episode 13: Bigfoot

From Wyoming Public Radio | Part of the HumaNature series | 19:05

For our 13th episode, we venture off the beaten path to hear about Bigfoot and the scientist who’s on a mission to find him.

Humanature_logo_wpm_2800x2800_small For our 13th episode, we venture off the beaten path to hear about Bigfoot and the scientist who’s on a mission to find him.

Episode 11: Hoofprints On The Heart

From Wyoming Public Radio | Part of the HumaNature series | 21:12

This is the story of a love that spans continents. Jon Dunham set out on the longest, toughest walk of his life. But along the way, he met someone who helped carry the weight.

Humanature_logo_wpm_2800x2800_small This is the story of a love that spans continents. Jon Dunham set out on the longest, toughest walk of his life. But along the way, he met someone who helped carry the weight.

Episode 12: Home On The Waves With A Seafaring Cowboy

From Wyoming Public Radio | Part of the HumaNature series | 19:18

Herb Pownall wanted to see the world. So he boarded a ship bound for Europe…along with 800 cows.

Humanature_logo_wpm_2800x2800_small Herb Pownall wanted to see the world. So he boarded a ship bound for Europe…along with 800 cows.

Glass Ceiling, Ivory Tower (feature)

From With Good Reason | Part of the news features series | 03:48

Women are earning more degrees in higher education than men. So why are there so few women in tenure track or leadership positions in academia?

Artworks-000196223300-lhgqjb-t500x500_small Women are earning more degrees in higher education than men. So why are there so few women in tenure track or leadership positions in academia?

Susie Ballot: Native Harvest crafter

From Northern Community Radio - KAXE & KBXE | Part of the Call of the Wild series | 07:53

Milt Lee talks with Susie Ballot who works with Native Harvest on the White Earth Indian Reservation, preparing corn in the traditional way to make hominy, a favored dish of the Ojibwe people.

Dsc05103_small Milt Lee talks with Susie Ballot who works with Native Harvest on the White Earth Indian Reservation, preparing corn in the traditional way to make hominy, a favored dish of the Ojibwe people.

Sound Opinions presents Tony Visconti on David Bowie

From Sound Opinions | Part of the Sound Opinions Specials series | 07:20

Hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot speak with producer Tony Visconti about his career working with chameleonic rock icon David Bowie. Bowie passed away on January 10, 2016. Visconti discusses meeting Bowie for the first time and the process of recording "Heroes."

Visconti-bowie_small Rock chameleon David Bowie has died at the age of 69. Throughout his long career, one of Bowie's most important collaborators was producer Tony Visconti. Sound Opinions hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot spoke with Visconti in 2008 about his work with the music icon. He described meeting the 22-year-old David Bowie for the first time in 1969 as well as the 1977 recording of "Heroes."

Enough with the "War on Christmas"

From KSFR | Part of the Equal Time with Martha Burk series | 02:30

The so-called “War on Christmas” is in full swing. Militant Christians say the well-known evergreen is a Christian symbol for a Christian holiday, and any attempts to ban it are anti-religion political correctness gone mad. On the other side, folks like a complaining Rabbi in New Mexico say Christmas trees leave out holiday celebrations by other faiths.

Turns out, both sides are wrong.

Podcastphoto_small The so-called “War on Christmas” is in full swing. Militant Christians say the well-known evergreen is a Christian symbol for a Christian holiday, and any attempts to ban it are anti-religion political correctness gone mad. On the other side, folks like a complaining Rabbi in New Mexico say Christmas trees leave out holiday celebrations by other faiths.

Turns out, both sides are wrong.

Rudolfo Anaya Discusses Oral Tradition in Light of His Novel, "Bless Me, Ultima"

From National Endowment for the Arts | Part of the Literary Moments series | :59

Author Rudolfo Anaya discusses the importance of oral tradition in light of his 1972 novel, "Bless Me, Ultima."

Bigreadlogo_small "Bless Me, Ultima" is about a boy much like Anaya, coming-of-age in the open llano of New Mexico. This Literary Moment is part of the NEA's Big Reads Moments. The Big Read is an NEA program designed to restore reading to the center of American culture by providing citizens with the opportunity to read and discuss a single book within their communities. In 2007, nearly 200 communities nationwide participated in the Big Read, reading one of twelve classic American novels such as "Fahrenheit 451" by Ray Bradbury and "Their Eyes Were Watching God" by Zora Neale Hurston.

313-Martian Motherlode

From Al Grauer | Part of the Travelers In The Night series | 02:00

Using ground penetrating RADAR on the NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, scientists have discovered an ice deposit on Mars the size of New Mexico.

Logoasteroid-2012-da14_small Please see the transcript.

Martin Luther King Jr.'s Secret Advisor

From WNYC | 07:38

The names of many of Reverend Martin Luther King Junior’s associates are well known: Harry Belafonte, Jesse Jackson, Andrew Young. But one of his most important confidants, a Jewish business man from New York named Stanley Levison, has remained largely hidden from public view. From what we know about him, Levison probably would have wanted it that way.

Default-piece-image-2 The names of many of Reverend Martin Luther King Junior’s associates are well known: Harry Belafonte, Jesse Jackson, Andrew Young. But one of his most important confidants, a Jewish business man from New York named Stanley Levison, has remained largely hidden from public view. From what we know about him, Levison probably would have wanted it that way.

Black Lives Matter: Collecting on MLK's "Promissory Note"

From Jarrod Sport | 20:57

How does today's Black Lives Matter Movement compare to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s leadership of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s? Can BLM be informed by MLK's legacy?

Dr. Clarence Jones, an advisor and advocate to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was integral in shaping Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech. Jones reflects on the question: With the recent mobilization of the "Black Lives Matter" movement, are Civil Rights groups finally collecting the remaining balance on the "promissory note"?

Handsup-1280x720_small How does today's Black Lives Matter Movement compare to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s leadership of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s? Can BLM be informed by MLK's legacy?

Dr. Clarence Jones, an advisor and advocate to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was integral in shaping Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech, and Jones is responsible for the "promissory note" metaphor in the speech. According to MLK, "This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the unalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness."

As the driving theme for the audio documentary, Jones reflects on the question: With the recent mobilization of the "Black Lives Matter" movement, are Civil Rights groups finally collecting the remaining balance on the "promissory note"?

Dr. Clarence Jones is a Visiting Professor at the University of San Francisco and Scholar in Residence at The Martin Luther King, Jr. Research and Education Institute.

This story was co-produced by Shadan Azali. 

Zoë Buckman on Fight Mode

From Cathy Byrd | Part of the Fresh Art International series | 14:29

Artist Zoë Buckman is in fight mode. Her own boxing gloves figure in recent mixed media installations, spoken word, and sound art projects that defend women's reproductive rights.

Zoe-buckman-portrait-crop-square_small Artist Zoë Buckman is in fight mode. Her own boxing gloves figure in recent mixed media installations, spoken word, and sound art projects that defend women's reproductive rights. This episode is an excerpt from the 3 Dec 2016 Fresh Art International show on Untitled, Radio, Miami Beach.

Sound Editor: Guney Ozsan | Swami Ji spoken word performance audio courtesy Zoë Buckman 

Conversations with Julian Bond

From With Good Reason | Part of the Black History Month specials series | 53:58

The late Julian Bond conducted 51 extensive interviews with prominent black leaders in America. Phyllis Leffler who led the project with Bond, has written a book on the series that offers insights into the intractable disparities of race in America. And more..

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The late Julian Bond conducted 51 extensive interviews with prominent black leaders in America. Phyllis Leffler who led the project with Bond, has written a book on the series that offers insights into the intractable disparities of race in America.    Also: In the 1940’s Fatima Massaquoi penned one of the earliest known autobiographies by an African woman. Arthur Abraham is one of three editors of The Autobiography of an African Princess , which traces Fatima’s life from her youth in Africa to her later years in America.

Later in the show:  In his book, The Truth About Cultural Bias , Allen Lewis looks at race in light of the Obama presidency and the George Zimmerman and Michael Dunn court cases as well as his own life. And:  Twitter is speeding up communication about racial incidents.  Bridgett Robertson says three-fourths of all African-Americans use Twitter to discuss political and social issues of importance to the black community.

Also: The Geography of Slavery is a website that catalogues more than 4,000 advertisements offering rewards for runaway slaves (including one written by Thomas Jefferson) placed in newspapers in the later part of the 18th century. Tom Costa says these advertisements humanize the stories of the runaway men and women and will also be used in the classroom to teach American history.

Your Daily Constitutional, 1.09.17-1.13.17

From WETS | Part of the Your Daily Constitutional series | 07:25

In these short daily segments, Stewart Harris talks about various topics and current events and how they pertain to laws already on the books or how they may help in changing the interpretation of the Constitution

Your_daily_constitutional_small_logo_small In these short daily segments, Stewart Harris talks about various topics and current events and how they pertain to laws already on the books or how they may help in changing the interpretation of the Constitution

Ep.31: The Great Bear Rainforest, Spirit Bears & Scientists at the Movies

From Greenpeace Podcast | Part of the Greenpeace Podcast Episodes series | 18:14

Eduardo Sousa walks us through an incredible, historical agreement on the Pacific Coast of Canada to protect a rainforest the size of Belgium. Bonus: What exactly is a Spirit Bear?

Andrew Norton answers the questions you never knew you had on the new podcast: #CompletelyOptionalKnowledge. This story: What pisses off scientists the most in the movies?

31_gbr___spiritbear_sq_small Eduardo Sousa walks us through an incredible, historical agreement on the Pacific Coast of Canada to protect a rainforest the size of Belgium. Bonus: What exactly is a Spirit Bear? Andrew Norton answers the questions you never knew you had on the new podcast: #CompletelyOptionalKnowledge. This story: What pisses off scientists the most in the movies?

Looking for Love

From Angela Regas | 06:50

In August of 2009 I was 29 years old, single, and living in Iowa City. I wasn’t going to be 29 much longer, and I decided I didn’t want to be single much longer, either. So I went looking online, not for love, but something a little more mundane, something between U-Hauls and one night stands. So far I’ve found a Latin lover, a cougar-seeking piece of “hot chocolate,” and a Satanist named Dan. And you know? He just might be the one.

3049713687_a56eec1bb6_small In August of 2009 I was 29 years old, single, and living in Iowa City.  I wasn’t going to be 29 much longer, and I decided I didn’t want to be single much longer, either.  So I went looking online, not for love, but something a little more mundane, something between U-Hauls and one night stands.  So far I’ve found a Latin lover, a cougar-seeking piece of “hot chocolate,” and a Satanist named Dan.  And you know?  He just might be the one.

Zach Paige: Seed preservation

From Northern Community Radio - KAXE & KBXE | Part of the Call of the Wild series | 15:44

Milt Lee talks to Zach Paige about his move in life from Long Island to the White Earth Reservation where he works with the Land Recovery Project helping to preserve original seeds for planting.

1-dsc05100_small Milt Lee talks to Zach Paige about his move in life from Long Island to the White Earth Reservation where he works with the Land Recovery Project helping to preserve original seeds for planting.

Rebeldes: A Journey through New Mexican Agriculture

From Terrascope Radio | Part of the Terrascope Radio Major Features series | 24:40

An engaging and informative look at farmers in a desert landscape, and at how their individual farming styles reflect their personal values.

Img_6177_small An engaging and informative look at farmers in a desert landscape, and at how their individual farming styles reflect their personal values. Explores modern industrial farming, centuries-old collective water-distribution organizations, ancient Navajo corn customs and semi-urban organic farming.

Math, Psychology, Philosophy... Sex?

From SexReally | Part of the SexReally Show series | 09:37

What does Aristotle have to do with your sex life?

Community_college_sq_small Several community colleges around the country are participating in an experiment to see if discussions and writing assignments about sex can help students make good sexual decisions.

Where in the World is Don Gamble?

From peter stock | 21:42

In the late 1990s, crack environmental consultant Don Gamble checked out of his comfortable east coast professional life...and disappeared. Ten years later, he resurfaced, as Swami Sivananda.

Swami-sivananda-on-boulder_small

"Haven't you ever just wanted to chuck it all in, and escape a daily routine that you felt was wearing you down? Just sell the house, the car, give up the electronic gadgetry, the monthly bills, the commute...

We all have. But few of us have the courage to just do it.

Top environmental consultant Don Gamble did find the courage to do just that back in the early 1990s.

Feeling disillusioned with the international environmental impact assessments he was working on, he bailed out, gave it all up, rediscovered yoga and meditation and found... peace."

Where in the World is Don Gamble?

From peter stock | 21:42

In the late 1990s, crack environmental consultant Don Gamble checked out of his comfortable east coast professional life...and disappeared. Ten years later, he resurfaced, as Swami Sivananda.

Swami-sivananda-on-boulder_small

"Haven't you ever just wanted to chuck it all in, and escape a daily routine that you felt was wearing you down? Just sell the house, the car, give up the electronic gadgetry, the monthly bills, the commute...

We all have. But few of us have the courage to just do it.

Top environmental consultant Don Gamble did find the courage to do just that back in the early 1990s.

Feeling disillusioned with the international environmental impact assessments he was working on, he bailed out, gave it all up, rediscovered yoga and meditation and found... peace."

Doomed Island

From peter stock | 23:02

The heart-wrenching true tale of a South Pacific island paradise that commits ecological suicide.

Playing
Doomed Island
From
peter stock

Index_small Nauru is a teeny speck of an island in the middle of the Southpacific. Once a bountiful habitat for 1,000 residents, in the past 150 years Nauru has been reduced to a lunar landscape of rubble. Novelist David Kendall tells the whipsaw tale of greed and shortsightedness, how phosphates made these islanders among the richest people in the world and how its subsquent depletion -- by their own hands -- has left them bankrupt and hopeless.

Fighting Ford: Hard Times in Detroit

From Chris Boulton | 12:14

In this intimate oral history, my uncle recalls how the Ford sit-down strike of 1937 radicalized him as a young man.

Fordstrike_small As America pulls out of the recession and Detroit retools for the future, this first-hand account revisits a contentious time in our collective past with humor and pathos. It's a story of the American Dream in the midst of the Great Depression and the birth of the UAW. A story told by the teenager who visited his Dad at the barricades of what the BBC called "the strike heard round the world."

Native Sounds: Gary Farmer

From Vision Maker Media | Part of the Native Sounds series | 11:12

Brendan McCauley speaks with Native American actor and musician Gary Farmer.

Gary_farmer_small NAPT Project Coordinator Brendan McCauley speaks with Gary Farmer, Cayuga, from Canada. Farmer has been a television and film actor since the 80s. He plays the father of the main character in Chris Eyre's Smoke Signals and is also one of the co-stars of Dead Man. He helped create Aboriginal Voices Radio in Canada.

Zora Neale Hurston

From KSLU | Part of the In Your Face Women series | 02:21

Zora was one of the shining lights of the Harlem Renaissance as a writer of novels, short stories, essays, articles, plays, folklore collections, and even an autobiography.

Playing
Zora Neale Hurston
From
KSLU

Hurston_small One night in 1925, at a literary awards dinner, Zora Neale Hurston (who had herself won fourof the awards that night) entered the ballroom, threw a long, brightly colored scarf over her shoulder and around her neck with a flourish and bellowed, "Coloooor Struuuuck!" (the name of one of her plays).  And that's just the way this in-your-face woman rolled.

Teacher Crush Vox

From Curie Youth Radio | 02:17

A vox full of memories of innocent teacher crushes.

Images_small A vox that works for National Teacher Day, Valentine's Day, or maybe a day close to graduation.  This is a light hearted collection of student voices waxing poetic about teacher crushes. 

#141 - Morphing Print Essays into Radio

From HowSound | 13:40

Here’s a modest proposal. For stations and programs and podcasts looking for content, collaborate with essayists — especially authors who are already writing for newspapers, magazines, and the web. A story from the New York Times made into radio by The Takeaway offers a great example.

Howsound_social_small

Here’s a modest proposal. For stations and programs and podcasts looking for content, collaborate with essayists — especially authors who are already writing for newspapers, magazines, and the web.

Of course, it’s not as simple as just recording what they’ve written and putting it on the air. Length, the writing, the delivery of the author. . .those elements and more need to be considered. But, those issues aren’t insurmountable and The Takeaway proved it.

Back in October, 2016, the New York Times published an essay about the war in Yemen written by Mohammed al-Asaadi. The staff at The Takeaway read it and said: this needs to be on the radio. So, they made it happen. The result is compelling.

Jay Cowit is the Technical Director for The Takeaway . Jay walks us through the steps to recording and sound-designing the essay — great lessons for anyone looking to produce print essays for the radio.

Episode 2: A Ballroom Dancer, A Shark, And A PR Problem

From Wyoming Public Radio | Part of the HumaNature series | 15:03

Debbie Salamone was an environmental journalist who was passionate about the ocean—and ballroom dancing. One day at the beach, all that changed.

Humanature_logo_2800x2800_small Debbie Salamone was an environmental journalist who was passionate about the ocean—and ballroom dancing. One day at the beach, all that changed.

Episode 9: May The Road Rise Up To Meet You, And May The Wind Stop Blowing In Your Face

From Wyoming Public Radio | Part of the HumaNature series | 17:24

Christina Lee should have been having the time of her life. Instead, she was stressed and lonely. Until she decided to run away from the rat race…all the way from New York to San Francisco.

Humanature_logo_wpm_2800x2800_small Christina Lee should have been having the time of her life. Instead, she was stressed and lonely. Until she decided to run away from the rat race…all the way from New York to San Francisco.

Solidarity And Revolt Aboard The Slave Ship Creole

From WWNO | Part of the TriPod: New Orleans At 300 series | 10:23

In this episode of TriPod, Laine Kaplan-Levenson discusses the slave revolt on the Brig Creole with Harvard Professor Walter Johnson.

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A “brig” is a two-masted ship, a big ship. And “brig” is the word used for a prison on a ship. And the Brig Creole is an 1800s ship that was meant to deliver 135 enslaved people to New Orleans. "Meant" being the key word here…

The ship left Virginia on October 30, 1841, with plans to take the same route that dozens of ships took to the port of New Orleans.

Walter Johnson, History Professor at Harvard University, says as of 1841, nothing could have been more ordinary than this journey. This was the height of the domestic slave trade in the United States.

“The bulk of the enslaved people who form the labor force in the emerging cotton kingdom are taken from the upper south, as one of the largest forced migrations in human history,” Johnson says.

Ships brought thousands of people into the New Orleans slave market. But those on board the Creole were determined to make moves and not land in the cotton kingdom.

Britain outlawed the international slave trade with the Slave Trade Act of 1807, and its ships take the lead in policing the high seas, searching ships of other nations. They sign bilateral treaties with Atlantic trading nations like Portugal, Sweden, France and others. But there’s one country that responds to this with "aw, hell no": America.

"So a British naval crew trying to interdict slave shipments is not allowed to stop a ship that has the American flag”, says Johnson. “What that means, in the words of the historian WEB DuBois, is that through the first half of the 19th century, Old Glory became the slave trader’s flag of choice.”

Other countries became hip to what the U.S. flag meant at sea, and started switching flags.

“So say you're a Spanish slave trader and you see a British naval ship on the horizon. The first thing the slave traders do is they run up the American flag, because that way they are protected by the mantle of American national sovereignty.”

So the U.S. was notoriously defiant, and we knew it. But back to 1841 and the Brig Creole, sailing the Atlantic under that flag, and everything it represented. A week into the journey, on the night of November 7, William Merritt, one of the slave traders aboard the Creole, goes down into the hold.

“He sees Madison Washington, who is one of the slave men” Johnson says. “He’s out of the hold where he's supposed to be. There's a confrontation, and the slave trader escapes from Washington's grasp and runs back on to the deck of the ship. He hears a shot fired and realizes that some of the slaves in the ship are in revolt, and within four or five hours the slaves have complete control of the ship.”

One slave trader is killed and thrown overboard, and captain Robert Ensor is wounded. Nineteen slaves are later identified as the rebels responsible for the revolt. They had heard of a ship that had departed from Virginia the year before, and shipwrecked in the Bahamas. That was British territory -- no slave trade allowed -- and those shipwrecked slaves were eventually emancipated by the local British government.

It was with that story in mind that the rebels took command of the Brig Creole, and re-routed it to Nassau, Bahamas.

The ship sails into the port in the Bahamas, and at that point, the 19 rebels kind of step down from power to mix in with the rest of the slaves. This is in hopes of not being targeted as criminals, but Johnson says what it also does is allow the white crew to reassert control and let Old Glory do the talking. “By raising the American flag is to say to the British ‘you have no interest in this. Just give us back the cargo and we'll push on to New Orleans.’”

Not so fast, say the British, who come on board to investigate what happened. They’re told by the Brig Creole crew that a group of slaves rebelled and briefly took control, which is why they’re docked in Nassau. But the Brits respond by saying, "Hey, USA, you can’t claim that a slave revolt has occurred. Not here, anyway."

“Because if there's no such thing as slavery in the British Empire,” says Johnson, “then there cannot be a slave revolt.”

The white crew just wants to keep the slaves on board, get back out to sea, and go make their profit in New Orleans. But Johnson points out that the community of Nassau at that time is mainly African. It’s full of emancipated slaves, and the West Indian regiment of Britain’s army. They realize what’s going on relates to them to the extent that many of them get into small boats with clubs and go out and position themselves around the Creole in order to protect it from any effort by the white crew to take it away and sail it back to New Orleans.

When the Americans realized need to regain control in the harbor, they tried to buy more weapons on shore, and no one in Nassau would sell them weapons. Johnson says there's this revolutionary Black Atlantic, there's the symbol of the American flag moving through the water saying "Don't mess with us, don't touch us," there's the British who have abandoned this ideology of slavery. And then all three of those forces just comes to a head at Nassau. “It’s pretty amazing what they did, right? So there's a story of the establishment of political solidarity under extreme conditions here.”

Political solidarity on many levels. As Johnson describes, the community in Nassau surrounds the docked Brig Creole in smaller boats to say "you guys aren’t going anywhere with those slaves -- they’re not yours anymore."’ The local government defends the community’s actions, and lends further support with their army! And the whole town boycotts American business by refusing to sell them weapons. Johnson says that it’s important to remember that before all this, was the plan to take over the ship in the first place.

“I mean these are 19 people who are from different areas of Virginia who have not known one another before they met in the slave pen and then on the slave ship in Virginia. At the end of October. And within a week, they come to trust one another and off to risk their lives on this venture. That's incredible.”

This is not something the white crew was expecting. Otherwise the ship’s captain, Robert Ensor, would have never brought his family along. In an article Johnson wrote about the incident, he writes:

For what else to call the oblivious confidence with which a man like Ensor brought a fifteen month old child aboard a slave ship. And an aspect of the property he held in his own slaves produced whiteness. A certainty born of history that events would break in his favor. That all would be well.

“And yet he's willing to lie to himself and say this is going to go all right,” says Johnson.  “Just like it always has been before. And it doesn't. It doesn't go all right.”

For the slave traders, at least. After months of depositions, insurance claims, and detention in jail, all the slaves, including the 19 rebels, were offered freedom. According to Johnson, ignorance and denial on behalf of the whites on board is what made something like this possible. They chose not to see that this "cargo" was capable not only of organization, but heroism. He says it all goes back to when the slave trader, William Merritt, first discovered one of his previously obedient slaves out of the hold.

“That moment seems be an extraordinary moment. This man Merritt, who thought that he was in one kind of history, is forced to confront the idea of the fact that something doesn't make sense. Something's happening that he doesn't understand. He says "but you're the last person I would expect to be out of order on the ship." And then it gradually dawned on him, and he starts to run. And that seems to me to be a moment, and a sense of possibility and danger that it's really worth us trying to imagine and capture.”

This boatwide emancipation was celebrated by abolitionists, and used in efforts to close the U.S. domestic slave trade. New Orleans was the main engine of that trade, and continued to profit from the trade for another 20 years. And although the story of the Brig Creole does not end in New Orleans, it was meant to, and shows the city’s prominent role within an Atlantic world full of slavery and revolution. Talk about rocking the boat…

Emmett and Trayvon

From The Center for Documentary Studies | 13:22

Documentary Theater artist Mike Wiley performs and discusses Dar He, his one-man play about the murdered teenager Emmett Till.

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Mike Wiley set out to be an actor – the usual kind, who gets hired to say fictional lines written by other people. Instead, he’s carved out a career doing documentary theater. Wiley writes plays that tell true stories from African American History, and hires himself to play all the roles.

One of his one-man plays tells the story of Emmett Till, the black Chicago teenager who was murdered in Mississippi in 1955. John Biewen tagged along as Mike Wiley performed that play in Florida, not far from where Trayvon Martin lived and died almost a half-century later.  

A Conversation with Isabel Wilkerson

From National Endowment for the Arts | Part of the Art Works Podcast series | 25:33

Isabel Wilkerson talks about her book, The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration, focusing on the transfer of Southern culture to the North, creating a new, vibrant culture in the country.

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"I was leaving the South to fling myself into the unknown.

I was taking a part of the South to transplant in alien soil,

to see if it could grow differently,

if it could drink of new and cool rains,

bend in strange winds,

respond to the warmth of other suns,

and, perhaps, to bloom."

That evocative description of leaving one's home in the North for another life in the South was in a footnote in Richard Wright's autobiography, Black Boy. Wright was one of six million African Americans who made that journey in the period following World War I through the 1960s. This mass movement of people became known as The Great Migration, and it's the subject of Isabel Wilkerson's acclaimed new book; which she titled The Warmth of Other Suns.

WTW Texts of Resistance

From Modern Language Association | Part of the What's the Word? Two half-hour programs celebrating Black History Month series | 29:00

How did slaves resist their oppression? Three works explore what it means to resist and to survive.

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Texts of Resistance

Since the late eighteenth century, writers have addressed the issue of transatlantic slavery.  Some of the works are direct calls to abolitionist action; others define resistance more subtly.   On this program, John Bugg talks about an eighteenth-century slave narrative, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano; Russ Castronovo tells us about Frederick Douglass’s novella, The Heroic Slave; and Natasha Barnes explores The Known World by Edward P. Jones.


Well-suited to Black History Month in February.

Fifteen- and thirty-second promos available.

BHM Special: The Life of Arthur Ashe (half)

From With Good Reason | Part of the Black History Month specials series | 28:59

The life and times of athlete, author, and activist Arthur Ashe - Profiling a program to help African-American college students graduate

Ashe_small Tennis great Arthur Ashe first emerged as a world-class athlete with his win over Jimmy Connors at Wimbledon, but his contributions as an activist, author, and humanitarian eventually transcended his sporting success.  Whit Sheppard is working on a biography of Arthur Ashe, who died at age 49 of AIDS related pneumonia.  And: Philanthropist Doris Buffett, sister of Warren Buffett, has funded a new program that helps first generation college students earn associate’s degrees in high school. Ann Woolford and Antwan Perry say the initiative is especially helpful for young African American males, who have the lowest national graduation rate.

On the Move in Mongolia

From Outer Voices | 23:43

There I was, an Indian woman on the move in a strange new land - Mongolia - and it didn't feel so strange. So much resonated - especially the voices of other women - like Monjago, a nomadic herder, Munkhtsetseg, a horse trainer, Onika, a student, Amgalan, a language teacher and Jainaa, a singer. They made faraway feel like home. Produced by Shebana Coelho for Outer Voices. Visit www.storiesfromthesteppe.com for a multimedia version of the piece featuring photos and audio.

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On the Move in Mongolia was produced for Outer Voices (www.outervoices.org) which showcases the seldom-heard voices of women the world over. 

 


Spring Days
Monjago is a nomadic herder who lives
with her family on the steppe of Eastern
Mongolia. Everyday, I shadow her -
herding cattle, milking cows, cleaning pens,
brushing cashmere. She’s always moving
…and I’m always struggling to catch up.


A Formidable Woman
There are very few female horse trainers in
Mongolia - and Munkh-Tsetseg is one of
them. She trains fast horses for the annual
festival of Naadam. The first time we meet she
says, “ I’m half a century” and “Come visit.”
So I do. I go to her ger homestead in Hentii province.

 
City Girl
Onika lives in the capital,
Ulaanbaatar and would like to set
the record straight - about
Mongolia, cities, horses, Harry
Potter and the ideal Mongolian
woman. 
 
 
 

Peaceful Moments
Amgalan lost her leg in an
accident 12 years ago and “that’s when I
really began living,” she says. Her name
means peace and her words --on nature,
destiny, loss and rebirth--embody wisdom. 
 
 
One Fine Evening
Jainaa lives with her family in Bayan Olgii
province. She just graduated from college and is in
limbo, wondering whether work or marriage is
next.  One night, I ask her for a song – she starts,
her family joins in, and the moment grows into an
impromptu concert in which a girl on the cusp faces the future.



Last Men in Aleppo Interview

From DW ~ Deutsche Welle | Part of the DW Radio Special Features series | 09:13

An interview with Firas Fayyad, director of the Sundance Award-winning film, "The Last Men in Aleppo".

Screenshot_2017-03-19_21

The director of Last Men in Aleppo is the Syrian-born filmmaker Firas Fayyad. Fayyad endured prison and torture at the hands of the Assad regime for documenting the early stages of the Syrian revolution. Ultimately he was forced to flee his home country and go to Europe as a refugee where he spends most of his time in Denmark and Germany. However, he returned to rebel-controlled territory in Syria in 2015 and 2016 to shoot his award winning documentary. He explained to DW Radio’s Neil King why he decided to steer clear of politics and instead opt for the personal approach for his documentary.

Harvard Critic Helen Vendler on Emily Dickinson

From Jenny Attiyeh | 18:02

When Helen Vendler was only 13, the future poetry critic and Harvard professor memorized several of Emily Dickinson’s more famous poems. They’ve stayed with her over the years, and today, she talks with ThoughtCast’s Jenny Attiyeh about one poem in particular that’s haunted her all this time. It’s called "I cannot live with You-".

According to Vendler, whose authoritative "Dickinson: Selected Poems and Commentaries" has recently been published, it’s a heartbreaking poem of an unresolvable dilemma, and ensuing despair.

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When Helen Vendler was only 13, the future poetry critic and Harvard professor memorized several of Emily Dickinson’s more famous poems. They’ve stayed with her over the years, and today, she talks with ThoughtCast’s Jenny Attiyeh about one poem in particular that’s haunted her all this time.  It’s called I cannot live with You-
According to Vendler, whose authoritative Dickinson: Selected Poems and Commentaries has recently been published, it’s a heartbreaking poem of an unresolvable dilemma, and ensuing despair.

This interview is the first in a new ThoughtCast series which examines a specific piece of writing — be it a poem, play, novel, short story, work of non-fiction or scrap of papyrus — that’s had a significant influence on the interviewee, that’s shaped and moved them.

Up next – esteemed novelist and short story writer Tom Perrotta discusses Good Country People,  a short story by Flannery O’Connor that’s particularly meaningful to him.

DW Radio Special Features (Series)

Produced by DW ~ Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

Children of Syria

From DW ~ Deutsche Welle | Part of the DW Radio Special Features series | 04:51

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The Syrian war marked a grim anniversary in March - the conflict entered its 7th year. That's enough time for a generation of children to grow up knowing no other Syria than the one at war. United Nations children's organization UNICEF issued a report on this anniversary reminding us the suffering of children they recorded in Syria reached unprecedented levels last year. More than 650 were killed, almost the same number injured. The individual voices of the children caught up in this can become lost. We're about to hear from two youngsters whose country has been at war for most of their lives - a nine year old girl and an 11-year-old boy.

 

Storm Over the Mountain

From Eileen McAdam | 16:41

Almost 50 years ago, a group of concerned citizens battled energy giant Consolidated Edison and launched the environmental movement.

Mehp_banner3_small We take it for granted that you can defend scenic beauty, wildlife and the environment with the power of the law. But there was a time when pollution by corporations went relatively unchecked until a small group of concerned citizens decided to fight back. Their struggle launched the modern environmental movement. It happened in the Hudson Valley and it all began with an image. An inspiring fun piece that celebrates the men and women who fought for 17 years to protect the Hudson River.

Mexican long-nosed bats ~ Leptonycteris nivalis

From Atlantic Public Media | Part of the One Species at a Time ~ The Encyclopedia of Life series | 05:30

There is a bat man in Mexico, and he has his own bat-cave...

Con_chrotopterus_chiapas_2012_small The batman of Mexico has his own bat-cave. He just shares it with 4,000 Mexican long-nosed bats. In this episode, join researcher Rodrigo Medellin as he descends into the Devil’s Cave just north of Mexico City. It’s a journey that started decades ago when Medellin was on a game show as a boy. He lost the game show, but won a prize far more valuable—for himself, his students, and Mexico’s bats. Ari Daniel Shapiro reports from Tepoztlán.

Passing Stranger: The East Village Walking Tour

From HowSound | 12:34

Pejk Malinovksy on producing audio tours including Passing Stranger: The East Village Poetry Walk

Howsoundfinallarge_small

It used to be people would say "Oh, the 1940s and 50s, that was the Golden Age of radio." Maybe ten years ago they were right.

Now, I'd say the 2010s are Golden Age of Radio. Take radio itself then add on satellite radio, HD radio, the internet, podcasts, mobile devices... the deluge of audio content is ridiculous. And, I didn't even mention audio tours, the topic on this edition of HowSound.

Radio producer Pejk Malinovski has ventured into the world of producing audio tours. He thinks other radio producers should, too, if for no other reason than they both use the same tools and skill set. Pejk's first audio tour production was Passing Stranger: The East Village Poetry Walk . On HowSound, Pejk talks about the tour and some of the differences between producing for radio and producing for a tour.

You should be sure to visit the Passing Stranger site AFTER you listen to the podcast. It's fascinating to see how they repurposed the audio tour for the web. Insanely clever, I'd say.

Happy listening!

Rob

Episode 5: Venus and Us: Two Stories of Climate Change

From Public Radio Exchange (PRX) | Part of the Transistor series | 17:32

Space scientists are acutely aware of what can happen when climates change in other parts of our solar system. Take Venus, where it rains sulfuric acid and is 900°F on the surface, but it wasn’t always that way. Astrophysicist Michelle Thaller talks with a NASA expert on Venus about how the planet became a hellscape. And she talks with the Library of Congress’ inaugural chair of astrobiology about how to grasp this new geologic era where humans cause rapid change.

Image__1__small Space scientists are acutely aware of what can happen when climates change in other parts of our solar system. Take Venus, where it rains sulfuric acid and is 900°F on the surface, but it wasn’t always that way. Astrophysicist Michelle Thaller talks with a NASA expert on Venus about how the planet became a hellscape. And she talks with the Library of Congress’ inaugural chair of astrobiology about how to grasp this new geologic era where humans cause rapid change.

Listen Up: Music & Politics (half)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 29:00

One man's quest to free Africa's historical recordings from the colonial archives - Teaching hip-hop diplomats how to use music for peace

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Since long before Louis Armstrong was sent to Egypt as a representative of the State Department, the United States has been using music as a key part of diplomacy. For Arthur Romano, a consultant on State Department musical missions overseas, music is an important form of conflict resolution. And: Noel Lobley wanted to give colonial musical archives back to the people — so he strapped DJ booths to donkey carts and took to the streets.

700 Fathoms Under the Sea

From Public Radio Exchange (PRX) | Part of the Transistor series | 08:11

Something unusual happens about a half mile under the sea. Ocean physics create a special zone where sound travels for hundreds, even thousands of miles. Whales use it, and cold warriors plumbed its secrets. Listen in.

Transistor1400x1400_small Something unusual happens about a half mile under the sea. Ocean physics create a special zone where sound travels for hundreds, even thousands of miles. Whales use it, and cold warriors plumbed its secrets. Listen in.

Fields of Remembrance

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 28:59

To honor the young men who sacrificed their lives in the D-Day invasion, Brigadier General Casey Brower takes young cadets on tours of the American cemeteries in France.

Cemetery_military_small When President Ronald Reagan traveled to Normandy in 1984 to mark the 40th anniversary of the D-Day invasion, a young army officer, Casey Brower, was with him and was deeply moved. Casey is now Brigadier General Casey Brower and takes cadets from Virginia Military Institute on tours of the American cemeteries for the fallen soldiers in France. The cadets are of the same age as many of the young men who made the sacrifice in the D-Day assault. Also featured: The Great Kanto Earthquake struck Japan in 1923 and killed more than 100,000 people.  In the chaos after the disaster rumors circulated that led hysterical Japanese vigilantes to lynch thousands of Korean and Chinese guest workers. Eric Han explores how modern Japan’s reaction to the recent earthquake reflects how that nation has changed in the intervening decades.

College Credits for Free (Feature)

From With Good Reason | Part of the news features series | 03:35

It used to be that a high school education was enough to support a comfortably middle class lifestyle. But these days, it takes a lot more to get a well-paying job. So, community colleges in Virginia are offering a program that helps students save time and money on their way to university degrees. Lilia Fuquen has the story.

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t used to be that a high school education was enough to support a comfortably middle class lifestyle. But these days, it takes a lot more to get a well-paying job. So, community colleges in Virginia are offering a program that helps students save time and money on their way to university degrees. Lilia Fuquen has the story.

The Pioneers Carrying Their Parent's Dreams: First Generation College Students

From Syracuse University Broadcast Journalism | 05:49

Today 50% of all college students are the first of their families to go to college. They carry the hopes and dreams of there families in their backpacks. Discover the surprising challenges these hidden pioneers face in getting their 4 year degree.

Lori_pic_small Today 50% of all college students are the first of their families to go to college. They carry the hopes and dreams of there families in their backpacks. Discover the surprising challenges these hidden pioneers face in getting their 4 year degree.

The Tale of Honeybee Brown (feature)

From With Good Reason | Part of the news features series | 04:22

Between a changing climate and an invasion of parasites, it’s a tough time for the little honeybee. A Norfolk woman’s quest to give bees a home may yield valuable research on their plight. She’s putting “bee backpacks” in the hands of local kids. John Last has that story.

Tidewater_boys_and_girls_club-2_small Between a changing climate and an invasion of parasites, it’s a tough time for the little honeybee. A Norfolk woman’s quest to give bees a home may yield valuable research on their plight. She’s putting “bee backpacks” in the hands of local kids. John Last has that story.

From Kremlin to Kremlin (feature)

From With Good Reason | Part of the news features series | 04:02

We may be in a period of historic closeness between Russia and the United States, but there was a time when hundreds of African-American scientists were helping Russia build a better Soviet state.

Jj_roane_young_small We may be in a period of historic closeness between Russia and the United States, but there was a time when hundreds of African-American scientists were helping Russia build a better Soviet state.

Summer Solstice - Dawn Songs

From BirdNote | 01:45

On the Summer Solstice, the longest day of the year, birds across the North American continent greet the dawn — from the Florida Keys and the marshes of Chesapeake Bay, from the Rio Grande Valley of Texas and the great plains of North Dakota, to the mountains of New Mexico and the Pacific Northwest, and all the way up to the Arctic. Wherever you live, step outside and listen to the magnificent chorus. Click on “Full Transcript” to see a list of the birds in this story.

Solstice-audubons-oriole-tom-grey-285_small On the Summer Solstice, the longest day of the year, birds across the North American continent greet the dawn — from the Florida Keys and the marshes of Chesapeake Bay, from the Rio Grande Valley of Texas and the great plains of North Dakota, to the mountains of New Mexico and the Pacific Northwest, and all the way up to the Arctic. Wherever you live, step outside and listen to the magnificent chorus. Click on “Full Transcript” to see a list of the birds in this story.

On Fort Belknap Reservation, a DIY Approach to Recovery

From University of Montana Journalism | Part of the The Meth Effect series | 08:31

News feature that profiles a first-of-its-kind recovery program for a meth and addiction problem that's only become worse on a northern Montana reservation. Produced by Nora Saks at the University of Montana School of Journalism.

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The myth of meth is that following the crackdown on over-the-counter ingredients in 2005, things got better in Montana. But on the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation, people will tell you different

Here it never really went away.

“Getting high in your car in front of the store - that ain't a big deal,” said Miranda Kirk.

“Leaving your paraphernalia out in the open for someone to walk in - that's alright,” said Kirk. “Having and seeing needles everywhere - that's ok. Even talking about selling your needles - that's normal too.”

Kirk, a 27-year-old mother of four, was born and raised in Fort Belknap, home to the Aaniiih and Nakoda, or Gros Ventre and Assiniboine tribes. She grew up around drugs, alcohol, and addiction, and has dealt with the fallout her whole life. When she came back home, she told the tribal council it shoudl do something drastic. So it said: Here's some support. How about YOU try. So Kirk and her sister created the Aaniiih Nakoda Anti-Drug Movement - one of the first Native-led peer recovery pilot projects in Montana.

Produced by Nora Saks [SACKS] for the Meth Effect, a limited series. 

Celia Cruz and Johnny Pacheco: Celia y Johnny

From Devon Strolovitch | Part of the Inside the National Recording Registry series | 05:47

Johnny Pacheco, Ana Cristina Reymundo, and Marisol Berrios-Miranda remember this breakthrough 1974 album, selected for the National Recording Registry in 2013.

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In 1974, Latin music in the US was about to get a kick in the pants. The audience for the big bands was graying; younger, US-born Latinos thought of the classic Cuban forms — the mambos and sones andguarachas and guaguancós — as their parents’ and grandparents’ music. But Johnny Pacheco, a bandleader and star percussionist, had formed a new record label with a new approach. Fania Records, based in New York, put those forms together with influences from Puerto Rico, Colombia and other countries, and called it salsa.

Pacheco wasn’t the first to use the term salsa to describe music, but Fania Records made it nationally popular, and Celia & Johnny was its first breakout hit. It set Celia Cruz, a singularly talented and popular singer who had worked with Tito Puente and his orchestra, in front of a much smaller band that left a lot of room for vocal improvisation. 

The story of Celia & Johnny is told by Latin music scholar Marisol Berrios-Miranda, Celiz Cruz biographer Ana Cristina Reymundo, and Johnny Pacheco himself. 

Glacially Cool Music (feature)

From With Good Reason | Part of the news features series | 03:29

The Alaskan wilderness is experiencing a major meltdown, but not all will be lost. Thanks to a musician in Virginia, the sounds of Alaska’s glaciers are being recorded for posterity and woven into haunting compositions.

Matthewglacier1_small The Alaskan wilderness is experiencing a major meltdown, but not all will be lost. Thanks to a musician in Virginia, the sounds of Alaska’s glaciers are being recorded for posterity and woven into haunting compositions.

Nisrin's Story

From Stanford Storytelling Project | 20:19

A touching and honest non-narrated produced portrait of one of the first people to be detained at SFO (San Francisco International Airport) under the initial Trump travel ban order. Stanford PhD student traveling from Sudan: Nisrin Abdelrahman

Sfo_-noban_protest_-jan_29__2016__31761491464__small Harvard graduate, Stanford PhD student:
https://anthropology.stanford.edu/people/nisrin-elamin-abdelrahman

See Transcript

Produced by staff and students at the Stanford Storytelling Project
https://storytelling.stanford.edu/

Music used from Freesound and original 



How water shapes the earth

From Kristina Young | Part of the Science Moab series | 21:21

An interview exploring how water shapes the surface of the earth and why understanding how water moves through an area can help us best manage landscapes with Dr. Taylor Joyal.

P7020178_small An interview exploring how water shapes the surface of the earth and why understanding how water moves through an area can help us best manage landscapes with Dr. Taylor Joyal.

The Sound of Science

From Outside Magazine | 19:40

Why environmental scientists are transforming big data into music.

Outside_podcast_logo_small Scientists are compiling huge amounts of data on the impact of global warming, but the story of that data often gets lost. Enter Nik Sawe, a researcher at Stanford who is transforming big data into music. Two parts science, one art, data sonification turns the numbers we tend to ignore into a very human story, and could potentially help scientists identify new trends and correlations that are easier to hear than to see.

Ecological change in drylands

From Kristina Young | Part of the Science Moab series | 17:58

An interview exploring ecological change over time, management actions to address current and future landscape changes, and human diversity in science fields with Dr. Laura Huenneke.

P5300046_small Like all ecosystems, the desert has a long history of ecological change.  Here, with Dr. Laura Huenneke, we explore that change and discuss desert ecology with the long lens of history.  To address future change, Dr. Huenneke explores the management and restoration actions that land managers might take to better equip of desert for changes to come with a warming climate.  Dr. Huenneke also discusses the lack of human diversity in science, and insists we need to include voices from all of our collective experiences in order to face the increase threats to our world. 

Episode 22: Through The Keyhole

From Wyoming Public Radio | Part of the HumaNature series | 20:15

Tyler Dunning went into the wild to distract himself from his grief…but ended up coming face to face with it instead.

Humanature_logo_wpm_small Tyler Dunning went into the wild to distract himself from his grief…but ended up coming face to face with it instead.

Episode 24: Bearded Ladies

From Wyoming Public Radio | Part of the HumaNature series | 21:01

This is the second episode in our three-part Science Camp series, where we’re exploring the human side of science. Paleobotanist Ellen Currano noticed a lack of other women in her field. So she decided to dress up as a man.

Humanature_logo_wpm_small This is the second episode in our three-part Science Camp series, where we’re exploring the human side of science. Paleobotanist Ellen Currano noticed a lack of other women in her field. So she decided to dress up as a man.

Mini-sode 3: Dr. Thaller Helps You Prep for The Eclipse

From Public Radio Exchange (PRX) | Part of the Orbital Path series | 11:16

The big one is coming! That is, the total solar eclipse of Aug. 21. Dr. Thaller shares her wisdom on how best to view the eclipse and its larger implications for science.

Orbitalpath-cover1_small The big one is coming! That is, the total solar eclipse of Aug. 21. Dr. Thaller shares her wisdom on how best to view the eclipse and its larger implications for science.