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Playlist: Josh's Picks

Compiled By: Josh Swartz

 Credit:

Homepage staff picks. beta.prx.org

The Lord God Bird

From Long Haul Productions | Part of the Song/Story series | 11:57

From the archives (2005): A lost and found woodpecker. Sufjan Stevens. A portrait of a town. What's not to love?

3_small Brinkley, Arkansas, is located just a few miles from where the Ivory Billed Woodpecker recently was rediscovered. The Ivory Bill had been thought to be extinct… in fact, the previous confirmed sighting of the bird in the United States was in Louisiana back in 1944, in what was known as the Singer Tract, an area which was clear-cut to make sewing machine boxes, and then ammunition cases and caskets during World War Two. The rediscovery of the Ivory Bill was big news, and brought a ray of hope to the residents of Brinkley. Producers Dan Collison and Elizabeth Meister spoke with people in the town, then shared the interviews with singer-songwriter Sufjan Stevens. Collison and Meister were curious about how Stevens writes his songs, which, much like their own work, are filled with stories of places and people. He wrote a song about the Ivory Bill, known as the 'lord god or 'great god' bird. Together, they offer this portrait of Brinkley--and the bird.

Out of the Blocks: Penn-North (mini version)

From Out of the Blocks | Part of the Out of the Blocks series | 06:00

Check out this audio-portrait of a neighborhood reflecting on Freddie Gray and the absence of justice, all set to electronic music.

Baltuprising_for_prx_small The Out of the Blocks team put together this audio-portrait of the epicenter of civil unrest in Baltimore in the wake of Freddie Gray's death in police custody.  These are the voices of Baltimore's Penn North community, two days after the neighborhood was ravaged by arsons and looting.

The Pirate - Part 4

From Lu Olkowski | Part of the CARGOLAND series | 30:26

Vivid scenes transport the listener in this stunning portrait about the life of Johnny O, self-proclaimed "pirate" of the waterfront.

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The Building Stewardesses: Construction Guides at the World Trade Center

From The Kitchen Sisters | Part of the Fugitive Waves series | 30:56

In light of the 14th anniversary of 9/11, here's the Kitchen Sisters with a look at the significance of the Twin Towers through the perspective of those who were known as "Construction Guides."

Ks_fugitivewavessm_small As construction commenced on the largest building project since the pyramids, questions and controversies swirled around Lower Manhattan. How tall? Why two? What's a slurry wall? A kangaroo crane? Where are the small businessmen going to go? What's a world trade center, and who needs it anyway? Guy Tozzoli, the Port Authority visionary behind the building of the Twin Towers, had an inspiration—"Construction Guides." Friendly co-eds in mini-skirt uniforms were posted at corner kiosks on the site to inform an inquiring public and put a pretty face on a controversial issue.

Blair (Unraveling Love)

From Matt Hodapp | Part of the Paris of the Plains Podcast series | 13:43

Modern love and modern heartbreak, courtesy of Tinder

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Falling in love means having a great deal of trust in another person. A sense that your emotions are going to be safe and secure in their possession. Falling in love is like solving a mystery. Finding out who a person really is in the locked vault of their heart. This is a story about discovering the person behind the tinder profile, beyond the Facebook page.

Mud Pots

From The World According to Sound | Part of the The World According to Sound series | 01:23

Check out the first episode from this wacky cool sound-rich series about sound – but not like you've ever heard it before. 90-second episodes to appease your tiny attention spans.

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A concise radio show that tells stories with sounds instead of, well, with stories. Every ninety-second episode is about a different sound. We might hear earth whistlers, mudpots, or bridges; a dying language, a forgotten language, or a way to communicate without words; what it's like to have auditory hallucinations, hearing loss, or tinnitus; famous music made by accident, by a murderer, or by a computer; or the call of the world's loneliest whale. We release new episodes every Tuesday and Thursday. www.theworldaccordingtosound.org.

Scene on Radio #2: Friends and Basketball

From The Center for Documentary Studies | Part of the Scene On Radio series | 26:27

Can the camaraderie of a team sport make race and class status “disappear” for the kids involved or their parents?

2014-12-10_16 More from suburban St. Louis, post-Ferguson, on the popular notion that sports unites communities. Scene on Radio host and producer John Biewen hangs with a girls’ high school basketball team to test the idea. Episode 2 of Scene on Radio. 

Secession's the answer

From Sally Helm | 08:49

Ever heard of the Martha's Vineyard secession movement? Didn't think so. Take 9 minutes to meet the old-timers reflect on their once-passionate rebellion and the young'uns contemplate the possibility of such a movement today. One of my favorite pieces in recent memory.

Img_3339_small INTRO: In the winter of 1977, residents of Martha’s Vineyard were outraged. A bill in the Massachusetts state legislature was going to strip them of their state representative. The island would be lumped into a larger Cape Cod district. Vineyard selectmen proposed a solution. A radical one. Secession. 

OUTRO:  Thanks to Nate Barnett (Bar-NETT) for voicing the Martha’s Vineyard state anthem.  

Every Time You Leave

From David Green | 03:08

Berlin, Germany - 1972. An American teenager tries to come to terms with what she sees and what she feels on both sides of the Wall while secretly meeting with East German youth unable to worship openly under Communist rule.

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As a child and teenager, Kathy and her family spent many summers in Germany. Her father, a Presbyterian Minister, supported and helped clergy and congregations living under Communist rule. He also took youth groups from his suburban Chicago church along with him. The experience these American teenagers had was, to say the least, eye-opening, as they crossed back and forth between West Berlin and East Berlin and secretly met and held church services with East German youth.

Unitarian Church Embraces Black Lives Matter Movement

From Katie Klocksin | 09:02

The story of how members of the mostly white Unitarian Church of Evanston decided to take a stand in the Black Lives Matter movement.

Uce_1_by_kk_small The story of how members of the mostly white Unitarian Church of Evanston decided to take a stand in the Black Lives Matter movement.

Note: producer Katie Klocksin attended this church while she was growing up.

My Mother's Hashes

From Benjamin Frisch | 09:05

"I was a drug smuggler for love, I was a drug smuggler for my mom."

Julie_looks_up_at_plants_small A first-person story. Julie Soller moved out in disgust when she discovered her mom's personal marijuana grow, but when her mother was diagnosed with Lou Gerhig's Disease, Julie became a drug smuggler for her mom's medical marijuana. 

Episode 32: It Looked Like Fire

From Criminal | Part of the Criminal series | 17:28

Ed Crawford had never been to a protest until he heard about the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. Robert Cohen, a staff photographer with the St. Louis Post Dispatch, ended up taking a photograph of Ed that would be seen around the world, and change both of their lives.

Criminal_podcast_logo_medium_small Ed Crawford had never been to a protest until he heard about the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. Robert Cohen, a staff photographer with the St. Louis Post Dispatch, ended up taking a photograph of Ed that would be seen around the world, and change both of their lives.

Identical Strangers

From Radio Diaries | 15:05

Paula Bernstein and Elyse Schein share 100 percent of their DNA. Separated at birth, the twins were both adopted and raised by loving families. They met for the first time at the age of 35, and discovered that they had been part of a unique research study on the ‘Nature vs. Nurture’ question.

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What is it that makes us…us? DNA or life experience? Genes or environment?

Paula Bernstein and Elyse Schein share 100 percent of their DNA. Separated at birth, the twins were both adopted and raised by loving families. They met for the first time at the age of 35, and discovered that they had been part of a unique research study on the ‘Nature vs. Nurture’ question. Hear their story on the Radio Diaries Podcast: Identical Strangers.

Episode 38: Jolly Jane

From Criminal | Part of the Criminal series | 25:01

Jane Toppan was born in Massachusetts in 1857. She attended the Cambridge Nursing School, and established a successful private nursing career in Boston. Said to be cheerful, funny and excellent with her patients, nothing about “Jolly Jane” suggested she could be “the most notorious woman poisoner of modern times.”

Criminal_podcast_logo_medium_small Jane Toppan was born in Massachusetts in 1857. She attended the Cambridge Nursing School, and established a successful private nursing career in Boston. Said to be cheerful, funny and excellent with her patients, nothing about “Jolly Jane” suggested she could be “the most notorious woman poisoner of modern times.”

Washing Machine Music

From The World According to Sound | Part of the The World According to Sound series | 02:00

Musique concrète and Matmos take a trip to the laundromat.

Final_round_06_small A miniature radio show that tells stories with sounds instead of, well, with stories. Every ninety-second episode is about a different sound. We might hear earth whistlers, mudpots, or bridges; a dying language, a forgotten language, or a way to communicate without words; what it's like to have auditory hallucinations, hearing loss, or tinnitus; famous music made by accident, by a murderer, or by a computer; or the call of the world's loneliest whale. We release new episodes every Tuesday and Thursday. www.theworldaccordingtosound.org .

Episode 5: From Syria With Baklava

From The GroundTruth Project | 34:05

The epic journey of a group of Syrian refugees brought together by a famous sweets shop called Salloura.

Syrian-American correspondent Dalia Mortada tells the story.

Screen_shot_2016-03-22_at_11 The epic journey of a group of Syrian refugees brought together by a famous sweets shop called Salloura. Syrian-American correspondent Dalia Mortada tells the story.

Losing Yourself

From Ibby Caputo | 25:50

It happens. A happy, healthy young person suddenly gets a grave diagnosis. What does not usually happen: The patient rolls tape.

Losing_yourself_photo_small This audio documentary features tape from a novice reporter who has just received a cancer diagnosis. It's raw and gets to the heart of a vulnerability we all share: that life is impermanent and good health is not guaranteed. 

Episode 45: Just Mercy

From Criminal | Part of the Criminal series | 24:56

As a law student, Bryan Stevenson was sent to a maximum security prison to meet a man on death row. The man told Stevenson he’d never met an African-American lawyer, and the two of them talked for hours. It was a day that changed Stevenson’s life. He’s spent the last 30 years working to get people off of death row, but has also spent the final hours with men he could not save from execution. He argues that each of us is deserving of mercy.

Criminal_podcast_logo_medium_small As a law student, Bryan Stevenson was sent to a maximum security prison to meet a man on death row. The man told Stevenson he’d never met an African-American lawyer, and the two of them talked for hours. It was a day that changed Stevenson’s life. He’s spent the last 30 years working to get people off of death row, but has also spent the final hours with men he could not save from execution. He argues that each of us is deserving of mercy.

A White Horse

From Nate DiMeo | Part of the the memory palace series | 08:51

A history of the oldest, continuously operating gay bar in the U.S., written in response to the attack in Orlando.

Playing
A White Horse
From
Nate DiMeo

A_white_horse_small A history of the oldest, continuously operating gay bar in the U.S., written in response to the attack in Orlando.

An American Life

From Erica Heilman | Part of the Rumble Strip Vermont series | 31:50

A story about war and hairdressing.

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Vaughn Hood was a 118-pound barber when he was drafted into the Vietnam War. And in Vaughn’s war, most men didn’t survive their first three-month tour.

Now Vaughn Hood runs a hair salon in St. Johnsbury with his wife, Bev. For a couple days, I sat and talked with him in the back of his salon. We talked about war, about hard work, about survival, and hairdressing.

Here is the story of an extraordinary American life.

Leland

From Erica Heilman | Part of the Rumble Strip Vermont series | 10:03

A ten-year-old on deep space, death, and Revolutionary War reenactments.

Playing
Leland
From
Erica Heilman

Dsc04445_small From my house, if you take a left through the woods, then a right up a dirt road, and then another right up another dirt road, you come to a really old farmhouse. That’s where Leland lives, and where he’s thinking things over. Last week he agreed to talk with me about some of these things. Death, deep space, and Revolutionary War reenactments. Welcome.

Poopy Old Man

From Erica Heilman | Part of the Rumble Strip Vermont series | 05:59

We are all busy getting older, for better and for worse. Here is an unvarnished perspective on aging by author Marc Estrin.

Marc Estrin is a writer, cellist and political activist who lives in Burlington, Vermont.

Dsc04188_small We are all busy getting older, for better and for worse. Here is an unvarnished perspective on aging by author Marc Estrin.

Marc Estrin is a writer, cellist and political activist who lives in Burlington, Vermont. His most recent book, And Kings Shall Be Thy Nursing Fathers, features the ruminations of Tchaikovsky’s corpse. You can find it on Amazon here, or order it from a local bookstore.

The Genius Improviser

From Jakob Lewis | Part of the Neighbors series | 17:44

Michael Kearney is a genius — he holds the Guinness World Record for being the youngest person to graduate from college, at age 10. Now he's 32, and he's not curing cancer or solving world hunger. He's running an improv comedy company in Nashville. Find out why this child prodigy decided to use his genius in such an unconventional way.

Genius-improviser-2_small Michael Kearney is a genius — he holds the Guinness World Record for being the youngest person to graduate from college, at age 10. Now he's 32, and he's not curing cancer or solving world hunger. He's running an improv comedy company in Nashville. Find out why this child prodigy decided to use his genius in such an unconventional way.

We Don't Talk Like That ... 'Fargo' and the Midwest Psyche

From 2 below zero | 59:00

The 1996 movie "Fargo" stirred widespread curiosity about snowy winters, funny accents and bloody mayhem on the frozen tundra of North Dakota and Minnesota. The film won two Oscar awards and inspired a popular television series of the same name. But how well did it actually capture and reflect the region? In this documentary, producers Diane Richard and Todd Melby unravel the mystery behind the parkas, prowlers and wood chippers in interviews with actors William H. Macy (Jerry Lundegaard), John Carroll Lynch (Norm Gunderson), Stephen Park (Mike Yanagita), Tony Denman (Scotty Lundegaard), dialect coach Liz Himelstein, women in law enforcement, and many more. Narrated by Bruce Bohne (Deputy Lou). Essential listening for diehard fans of "Fargo."

Fargo14_small The 1996 movie "Fargo" stirred widespread curiosity about snowy winters, funny accents and bloody mayhem on the frozen tundra of North Dakota and Minnesota. The film won two Oscar awards and inspired a popular television series of the same name. But how well did it actually capture and reflect the region? In this documentary, producers Diane Richard and Todd Melby unravel the mystery behind the parkas, prowlers and wood chippers in interviews with actors William H. Macy (Jerry Lundegaard), John Carroll Lynch (Norm Gunderson), Stephen Park (Mike Yanagita), Tony Denman (Scotty Lundegaard), dialect coach Liz Himelstein, women in law enforcement, and many more. Narrated by Bruce Bohne (Deputy Lou). Essential listening for diehard fans of "Fargo."

Driving In Circles

From Martine Powers | 10:14

In the summer of 2015, the Falmouth Board of Selectmen considered a proposal from the state to replace the intersection of Routes 28A and 151 in North Falmouth with a roundabout. The controversy over the board’s decision reflects a larger shift in traffic engineering across the country: How should intersections protect us from the fallibility of the human mind?

Default-piece-image-0 In the summer of 2015, the Falmouth Board of Selectmen considered a proposal from the state to replace the intersection of Routes 28A and 151 in North Falmouth with a roundabout. The controversy over the board’s decision reflects a larger shift in traffic engineering across the country: How should intersections protect us from the fallibility of the human mind?

A Magic Door

From Gianluca Tramontana | 29:00

An inside look into the closing of one of New York City’s last iconic recording studio where David Bowie, Lou Reed, Sonic Youth, The Ramones, Blondie, Foo Fighters and Suzanne Vega recorded.

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In 2013 David Bowie chose the Magic Shop’s hidden downtown location, vintage equipment and good vibes to record his comeback album ‘The Next Day’. He was so inspired that he returned almost immediately to make his follow-up ‘Blackstar’. Lou Reed, Sonic Youth, The Ramones, Blondie and Coldplay are just some that have called the studio their creative sanctuary and the Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl made the Magic Shop the centerpiece of his HBO series Sonic Highways. But all the Kudos from recording legends could not save the studio from rising rents and the studio closed at the end of March. 

Four-time Grammy owner Steve Rosenthal gives music journalist Gianluca Tramontana full access all areas and explains what makes a great recording studio. He also talks about some of his legendary clients including Lou Reed and David Bowie. We also witness the studio's last forty-eight hours as producer John Agnello, who has worked with Aerosmith, Sonic Youth and Dinosaur Jr., produces the last ever session while downstairs Steve Rosenthal packs up twenty-eight years of his life and puts memorabilia aside for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. He asks his wife “What are we going to do with all these Natalie Merchant tapes?” as Magic Shop interns fill a dumpster outside. These are the sounds of the last 48 hours of the Magic Shop. We follow the dismantling of possibly New York’s last iconic studio until the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame took the moments and the vintage mixing board was dismantled and hauled away - sold to a rich collector.


2012: A Year In Your Ear - "Someone's Screaming Outside"

From Mad Genius | Part of the 2012: A Year In Your Ear series | 03:31

Here it is, the latest song in our "Year In Your Ear" series. We're calling it "Someone's Screaming Outside." Trayvon Martin, George Zimmerman, one gunshot and our attempt at telling their complex story using only sounds found on YouTube. Should clear up all remaining questions, right?

Mad_genius_pic_small

NEW!  Watch the "music video" (and we use that term loosely) at our series page or at YouTube under MadGeniusBlog.

While working on its debut album, the anonymous vérité pop collective Mad Genius decided to follow the real money with this foray into public broadcasting.

Keeping with what we do best, we're sampling the world's news and audio culture (both professional and amateur) in an effort to tell stories in a way that would make Ira either cry in pain or throw fits of furious envy. Maybe both, come to think of it. We're taking the talking heads and turning them into pop stars, making music with the media and nothing more. The goal is to create an hour-long musical time capsule by the end of the year. That is, of course, unless the apocalypse comes first.

Here's our latest episode. We're calling it "Someone's Screaming Outside." Trayvon Martin, George Zimmerman, one gunshot and our attempt at telling their complex story using only YouTube reaction to the situation. Should clear up all remaining questions, right?

As we write this, we're developing our next track. A little Columbian samba that takes on the Secret Service. Our question for you: Should we be scared? Will M.I.B.'s visit our studio at Mad Manor? Stay tuned...

Fantasy Maps

From Eric Molinsky | Part of the Imaginary Worlds series | 16:07

What Google Maps and Middle-earth have in common.

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J.R.R. Tolkien not only kicked off the modern fantasy genre, he also made maps an indispensable part of any fantasy book. Tolkien spent decades mapping out Middle-earth on graph paper -- and giving everything a name -- because he was inventing a world from scratch. Many of his maps weren't even published until after he died, but today's fantasy cartographers owe a great debt to his work. They also have a post-modern understanding that to create a believable fantasy map, they have to sow doubt in the minds of readers as to whether we should trust the mapmakers. With Isaac Stewart, Pricilla Spencer, Ethan Gilsdorf and Stefan Ekman.

Episode 7: Man vs. Machine

From Wyoming Public Radio | Part of the HumaNature series | 13:32

Micah Schweizer was skiing in the back-country when he uttered a curse against snowmobilers. But you know what they say—be careful what you wish for.

Humanature_logo_2800x2800_small Micah Schweizer was skiing in the back-country when he uttered a curse against snowmobilers. But you know what they say—be careful what you wish for.

Always Wear Earth Tones

From New Hampshire Public Radio | Part of the Outside/In series | 23:00

When Tony Bosco turned 30, he decided he wanted out of the rat race. So he went to his hometown in New Jersey, walked into the woods, and stayed there for 23 years. How did Tony manage to hide in plain sight for more than two decades in the most densely populated state in the nation? And what makes someone exchange all of the comforts of home for a life in the woods?

Tony-bosco-title-card-no-ep_small When Tony Bosco turned 30, he decided he wanted out of the rat race. So he went to his hometown in New Jersey, walked into the woods, and stayed there for 23 years. How did Tony manage to hide in plain sight for more than two decades in the most densely populated state in the nation? And what makes someone exchange all of the comforts of home for a life in the woods?

Episode 1: Life on a million dollar block

From KCRW's Independent Producer Project | Part of the Off The Block series | 07:10

One small neighborhood of Los Angeles accounted for thousands of bookings into county jail over a five year period.

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"If you try to do better with your life but they won’t let you then you just revert back to the same thing," says one resident who's been to jail many times, "you just continue the cycle."
Even a short time in jail can have long-term consequences. Across LA, some blocks have higher arrest rates than others. How does that affect the neighborhood?
Reporter George Lavender talks to a UCLA researcher working to identify areas in LA County where millions of dollars have been spent locking people up. Then he talks to residents on a 'million dollar block' in Westmont, where almost everyone knows what it's like to be in jail -- and to try to stay out.

Almost Flamboyant by Lea Redfern and Rijn Collins (1st Place)

From The Sarah Awards | Part of the 2016 Sarah Awards Winners series | 11:25

A group of ravens is an unkindness. A gathering of rhinos is (appropriately) a crash. So what do you call a flock of flamingos? This story begins in a steamy back laneway in Melbourne, Australia. We are captivated by an unpredictable young woman, her unlikely new friend, and an unexpected connection to the music of Tom Waits.

2016 A group of ravens is an unkindness. A gathering of rhinos is (appropriately) a crash. So what do you call a flock of flamingos? This story begins in a steamy back laneway in Melbourne, Australia. We are captivated by an unpredictable young woman, her unlikely new friend, and an unexpected connection to the music of Tom Waits.

Ornithophobia

From Eric Winick | 07:21

There was something about the flamingo area at Marineland that attracted four year-old Megan Whitman.

Playing
Ornithophobia
From
Eric Winick

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Story by:  Megan Whitman
Recorded:  July 2016, New York, NY
Music:  Jimmy Fontanez

There was something about the flamingo area at Rancho Palos Verdes'  Marineland that attracted four year-old Megan Whitman.  Maybe it was the color:  pink, her favorite.  Or maybe it was the sheer beauty of the birds.  Whatever the reason, she and her father ventured over for a closer look.  What happened next changed her life.

Megan Whitman is a native of Los Angeles who has lived in New York for the past decade. She is the Director of the Lambert Center for Arts + Ideas at JCC Manhattan, overseeing arts programming for the vibrant community center. Megan received her BA with Honors from The University of Chicago and has a Master of Arts degree from Columbia University. She lives in Brooklyn with her husband and dog. 

To read more about the fate of Marineland, click here. 

The Cactus King

From Mark Bramhill | 05:51

Meet Lyn Rathburn: folk artist and cactus mogul.

Img_1064_small On the side of I-45, nestled between surplus stores and auto shops, is not where you'd expect to find royalty. But, sure enough, this is Lyn Rathburn's home, and he's a king. The cactus king. Over many decades, he's carved out a name for himself as the cactus mogul of Houston. But more than just an entrepreneur, Lyn's plant nursery is teeming with his folk art.

An American Mosque

From Monique Parsons | 28:01

An inside look at an American mosque: the story of two men who set out to build a "model mosque" in the suburbs of Chicago.

Oppc0501-2907_small Reported over 10 years, this close-up view of a mosque in turbulent times debuted on WBEZ Chicago. The Prayer Center of Orland Park is one of the largest mosques in the Chicago area. It sits on a hill 35 miles southwest of Chicago in a township that went for Donald Trump on election day, lighting up a swath of red in mostly blue Cook County, IL. When Malik Ali, a film producer and distributor, and Mohamed Krad, a physician, set out to build it over a decade ago, they wanted to create a model for what an American mosque could be: a place with a savvy American-born imam, vibrant youth programs, community engagement and a home for young and old. Along the way, they faced community opposition, internal challenges, and gunshots. Ten years later, as they face life under the Trump administration, they wrestle with what's next for their community. 
 

A Life Sentence: Victims, Offenders, Justice, and My Mother

From Atlantic Public Media | Part of the The Transom Radio Specials series | 58:00

This is a story about a terrible crime and everything that followed. It’s an intensely personal documentary, but it extends into public life and into the heart of our political and correctional systems.

Some stories take a long time. This one is an hour long and took two and a half years to produce, after twenty years of living with it.

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In the opening of this documentary, Samantha Broun says:

In 1994, my mother was the victim of a violent crime. She was 55 years old and living alone in Nyack, New York.  On the evening of September 21st a stranger came into her backyard. The stranger attacked her from behind. Five hours later, he left her lying on her bed. Hands and feet bound with tape. Alive. She survived.  

I suppose I could start this story with how the system failed. Or with McFadden’s family in Philadelphia. I could start with the thousands of prisoners whose hopes for a second chance were obliterated because of what McFadden did in 1994. Or I could tell you about the political careers both launched and destroyed. But instead I think I’ll save those parts and start where I usually start which is with my mother.

Produced for Transom.org  

 


Transom.org
  channels new work and voices to public radio, with a focus on the power of story, and on the mission of public media in a changing media environment. Transom won the first Peabody Award ever granted exclusively to a website. Transom.org is a project of Atlantic Public Media which runs the Transom Story Workshops and founded WCAI, the public radio station in Woods Hole, Mass.



Support for this work comes from National Endowment for the Arts 
 

 

National Endowment for the Arts


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Gloria Gaynor: I Will Survive

From Devon Strolovitch | Part of the Inside the National Recording Registry series | 06:43

Originally released as a B-side, so many deejays began playing Gloria Gaynor's “I Will Survive” that the record company reissued it as a single. It was immediately embraced as an emblem of women’s empowerment and soon became anthem among the LGBT community and survivors of all kinds. Music writer Vince Aletti joins Gaynor herself to tell the story of the recording.

I_will_survive_gloria_gaynor_small Originally released as a B-side, so many deejays began playing Gloria Gaynor's “I Will Survive” that the record company reissued it as a single. It was immediately embraced as an emblem of women’s empowerment and soon became anthem among the LGBT community and survivors of all kinds. Music writer Vince Aletti joins Gaynor herself to tell the story of the recording.

Ep 02. Dust - Sue and Greg

From Kismet Podcast | 16:20

Greg, a New York City cop, was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia 11 years after being covered in dust and debris at the World Trade Center attack in 2001. A forgotten moment from Sue 30 years prior was to be crucial if he was to survive.

Sue___greg_cover_300_small Greg, a New York City cop, was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia 11 years after being covered in dust and debris at the World Trade Center attack in 2001. A forgotten moment from Sue 30 years prior was to be crucial if he was to survive.