%s1 / %s2

We're working on a new version of PRX. Want a sneak peek?

Playlist: January - Documentaries on Demand

Compiled By: PRX Administrator

 Credit:
Curated Playlist

It is January. You need documentaries. Here are our curated selections.

New Years: A Reflection

From Western Folklife Center Media | 57:03

A meditation on New Years as a time of reflection and healing.

Default-piece-image-2 Join in a New Year journey with host Hal Cannon to an ancient Gaelic ritual of bringing in the year with fiddler Alasdair Frazier. Then join Jean Redpath for the original ?Auld Lang Syne.? From the Isles back to the States we travel to delve into the Native American way of marking time with a heartfelt story from Lakota elder, Leonard Littlefinger telling how ritual can help us transform a brutal history into a new story of hope. We end with the hope of a healthy land from the Grand Canyon. Join us

Lost & Found Sound: Hour One

From The Kitchen Sisters | Part of the Lost & Found Sound series | 59:04

Lost & Found Sound is an eclectic gathering of stories both historical and entertaining, woven together with lyrical sonic transitions, surprising audio artifacts and musings by the likes of Sun Records producer Sam Phillips.

Lfsmiddle_small Some of the stories in this collection include: "Carnival Talkers" - a tale of the vanishing voices and fading art of the sideshow pitchman. "Cigar Stories: El Lector, He who reads" - a lost tradition of story and smoke. In "Quest for Sound: Gettysburg Eyewitness," listen as a man recalls watching Lincoln give his historic address at Gettysburg. Follow New York recording legend Tony Schwartz through the neighborhood he has relentlessly recorded for some 50 years in "Tony Schwartz - 30,000 Recordings Later." Eavesdrop on Tennessee Williams and his friends recording on cardboard discs in a New Orleans penny arcade in "Tennessee Williams and The Pennyland Recordings" and listen to the strangest presidential telephone calls ever recorded in "LBJ and the Helium Filled Astronaut." The Lost & Found Sound radio series explores how recorded sound has captured American history. The series chronicles, reflects and celebrates the human experience through rare home recordings, sonic snapshots, and remarkable stories about people possessed by sound. If your station wants to air these specials and it's not an NPR member station, please call NPR program and member services at 1-800-329-5380.

Lost & Found Sound: Hour Two

From The Kitchen Sisters | Part of the Lost & Found Sound series | 59:04

Lost & Found Sound is an eclectic gathering of stories both historical and entertaining, woven together with lyrical sonic transitions, surprising audio artifacts and musings by the likes of Sun Records producer Sam Phillips.

Lfsmiddle_small Some of the stories in this collection include: "Carnival Talkers" - a tale of the vanishing voices and fading art of the sideshow pitchman. "Cigar Stories: El Lector, He who reads" - a lost tradition of story and smoke. In "Quest for Sound: Gettysburg Eyewitness" listen as a man recalls watching Lincoln give his historic address at Gettysburg. Follow New York recording legend Tony Schwartz through the neighborhood he has relentlessly recorded for some 50 years in "Tony Schwartz - 30,000 Recordings Later." Eavesdrop on Tennessee Williams and his friends recording on cardboard discs in a New Orleans penny arcade in "Tennessee Williams and The Pennyland Recordings" and listen to the strangest presidential telephone calls ever recorded in "LBJ and the Helium Filled Astronaut." The Lost & Found Sound radio series explores how recorded sound has captured American history. The series chronicles, reflects and celebrates the human experience through rare home recordings, sonic snapshots, and remarkable stories about people possessed by sound. If your station wants to air these specials and it's not an NPR member station, please call NPR program and member services at 1-800-329-5380.

Seeking Peace on Earth: The 2007 Peace Talks Radio Special (59:00/54:00)

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 58:59

During the season when hopes for Peace on Earth are expressed, spend an hour hearing from people whose life's work is pursuing peace in different ways. A compendium of compelling moments from the Peace Talks Radio Series in 2007.

Poddcastart_small In a season when people are speaking their hopes for a more peaceful planet, we present a compendium of highlights from the Peace Talks Radio series on peacemaking and nonviolent conflict resolution. Listeners will hear about three Nobel Peace Laureates. The peacemaking diplomacy of 1950 Peace Prize winner Ralph Bunche is recalled. 1997 Nobel Peace Laureate Jody Williams talks about her campaign to ban landmines and speaks of personal repsonsibility in peacemaking. The microcredit work of 2006 Nobel Peace Laureate Muhammad Yunus is explored. Also, a remarkable story of forgiveness leads to a program for teaching nonviolence in schools, author Byron Katie talks about the search for inner peace, young people of disparate faiths work together on community projects, and 9/11 Families turn their grief into action for peace. This is one in a series of evergreen programs highlighting the Peace Talks Radio series. Note other program links below. They can run any time and are usually quite popular with audiences relieved to hear that people ARE working for and talking about peace. This 2007 program is available in a 59 minute version and a 54 minute newscast ready version. Stations needing the newscast version can drop the optional newscast content segment. TIMINGS AND CUES 00:00:00 - 00:00:59 - Open Billboard 00:01:00 - 00:05:59 - OPTIONAL NEWSCAST CONTENT 00:06:00 - 00:23:10 - Seg. A (ends with :59 music bed for local spots) 00:23:11 - 00:37:53 - Seg. B (ends with :59 music bed for local spots) 00:37:54 - 00:58:58 - Seg. C (ends with 4 seconds of music out cold) 2006 SPECIAL: http://www.prx.org/pieces/15225 2005 SPECIAL: http://www.prx.org/pieces/6931 2004 SPECIAL: http://www.prx.org/pieces/2866 2003 SPECIAL: http://www.prx.org/pieces/338

Max Roach--Drums Unlimited

From Ben Shapiro | 53:59

Master drummer Max Roach recounts his own extraordinary journey, from the era of the Jim Crow south to the creation of modern jazz, from the civil rights years to far-reaching experiments in percussion--with thrilling music and storytelling help from friends like Dizzy Gillespie.

Max_small Imagine a musician single-handedly redefining what an instrument can do, elevating it to a whole other level. That's what the late Max Roach did for the drums. Whether its Jazz or rock or funk, there isn't a drummer today who isn't somehow influenced by what Roach played. But that's only a part of Max Roach's story, which spanned the Harlem Renaissance, the development of modern jazz, right up to hip hop and multi-media. Over a fifty-year career he blazed his way across genres as percussionist, bandleader and composer. Max Roach tells his story with frankness and a characteristic sharp wit, supported by "special guests" including Dizzy Gillespie, and noted drummers Paul Motion and Art Taylor. Max Roach--Drums Unlimited is narrated by Kenny Washington, a host of shows on public radio and Sirius, and himself a well-known jazz drummer. Washington brings his own drum-knowledge to the table, as well as a friendship with Max Roach. Max Roach passed away in August, 2007, and this original special pegs to either end-of-year "obit", or to his birth date, January 10. Despite its timeliness now with his recent passing, the show is evergreen for any future use.

Southern Slices: Summer Institute Stories from CDS

From The Center for Documentary Studies | 54:00

A collection of student pieces from CDS "audio camp," 2003 - 2007.

P1020775_small Radio-making isn't just for professionals. Every summer, several dozen people from across the country converge on the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University to learn the skills of audio documentary work -- recording, shaping and crafting a piece, and mixing it on the computer. They get guidance and inspiration from seasoned producers. (They also tend to eat good barbecue and see a Durham Bulls baseball game.) This show pulls together seven of the best works made by those students -- many of them first-time producers. "Southern Slices" is hosted by CDS audio program director John Biewen.

Peace Talks Radio: Martin Luther King Jr.'s Path To Nonviolence (59:00/54:00)

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 59:01

Martin Luther King Jr.'s journey to a philosophy of nonviolence and his lasting legacy as a peace proponent is recalled in interviews with his daughter, the late Yolanda King, and one of King's top colleagues in the civil rights movement, Dr. Dorothy Cotton. This program is also available in a 29:00 version at PRX.

Yolandaking_small IMPORTANT: Please have your local announcer read the following script before and after this show. "The following (preceding) program, featuring an interview with Yolanda King, the daughter of the late Martin Luther King Jr., was recorded in 2004. Yolanda King died, at the age of 51, May 15, 2007." PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: Two women with very close ties to Martin Luther King Jr. reflect on how King developed into one of the great moral and political philosophers of the 20th century and how his philosophies might still guide the world through troubled times today. Dr. Dorothy Cotton was the highest ranking female in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, founded by Dr. King. From 1960 to 1972 Dr. Cotton was the educational director for SCLC and worked very closely with Dr. King. The late Yolanda King was the eldest daughter of Dr. King. She was an internationally known motivational speaker and actress whose personal mission in life was to inspire positive social change and world peace. Ms. King died in May of 2007 at the age of 51. Ms. King and Dr. Cotton were interviewed separately in 2004 by phone by show host Carol Boss. The entire program includes about 15 minutes of excerpts from talks by Dr. King, along with music by U2 ("Pride in The Name of Love") and 1960's recordings by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Freedom Singers. Newscast Compatible (but airing a newscast will pre-empt a compelling King speech clip). Program is split into two parts that can be run as separate half hours. The two 29 minute parts can stand alone and are separated by a minute long music bed. A 29:00 version of the program is also available on PRX: http://www.prx.org/piece/3124

A Shortcut To The Mountaintop

From Peter Bochan | Part of the Shortcuts series | 29:27

Martin Luther King, Jr. Tribute Mix

Martin_luther_king__jr A tribute to Martin Luther King Jr, featuring many of his most famous speeches mixed with music from Stevie Wonder, The Freedom Singers, Jimmy Cliff, James Taylor, Nina Simone, Bill Lee/Branford Marsalis, Moodswings,U2 and more---

Mandela: An Audio History (Hour Version)

From Radio Diaries | Part of the Mandela: An Audio History series | 58:44

Hour version of Mandela: An Audio History

Mandelaclean_small Credits/Back anounce: Our story was produced by Joe Richman of Radio Diaries. Mandela: An Audio History is has just been released as a CD, hosted by Desmond Tutu with an introduction by Nelson Mandela. To find the CD, search for "Mandela: An Audio History" on Amazon or visit: www.mandelahistory.org Notes: This is a one hour version of the series, Mandela: An Audio History, which was originally broadcast as a 5-part series on All Things Considered. The host introducton is by Desmond Tutu. For more information visit the project website: www.mandelahistory.org or email the producer, Joe Richman, joe@radiodiaries.org There are a few different options for stations: Version One: no news hole (2 floating breaks) Version Two: newscast compatible (2 floating breaks) Version ThreeA: first half hour (with no host intro, ids or credits) Version ThreeB: second half hour (with no host intro, ids or credits) 15 and 30 second promos also available. Timings and Cues provided.

A Small Southern Town: The Nation's Capital In Slave Times

From Richard Paul | 54:10

Dramatization - largest mass-escape of slaves in Amer history - PROMOS ATTACHED

Smallsouthern_small Hear the first person accounts of people who lived in slavery; the voices of those who worked to end slavery and those who strove to keep it in "A Small Southern Town: The Nation's Capital In Slave Times." In this special designed for African American History Month, listeners will hear of one family's role in one of the largest mass escapes of slaves in American history. "A Small Southern Town" combines dramatic readings of first person accounts from slave times with modern day analysis to shed light on little known aspects of slave life and slave times in the Nation's Capital. ----------------------------------------- Richard Paul offers these suggestions for reading on subjects covered in his two-part program on slavery: * Arguing About Slavery, by William Lee Miller. Published by Alfred A. Knopf, c. 1996. Available at bookstores. * Personal Memoir of Daniel Drayton: For Four Years and Four Months A Prisoner (For Chairty's Sake) In Washington Jail including A Narrative Of the Voyage and Capture Of The Schooner Pearl. Published by Negro Universities Press, c. 1855. Available at the DC Historical Society. * Fugitives of the Pearl, by John Paynter. Published by Associated Publishers, Inc., Washington, DC, c. 1930. Available at the DC Historical Society. * The Life of Josiah Henson, Formally a Slave, Now an Inhabitant of Canada, by Josiah Henson, c. 1849. Available at the Montgomery County Historical Society. Newspaper Articles * "Uncle Tom's Montgomery County Cabin" by Michael Richman, The Washington Post, Wednesday December 10, 1997; Horizon section; Pg. H05 * "Escape on the Pearl: Years Before the Civil War, 77 Washington Slaves Made a Risky Bid for Freedom" by Mary Kay Ricks, The Washington Post, Wednesday August 12, 1998; Horizon section; pg. H01

In the Spirit

From WPSU | 59:00

A one-hour retrospective of 20th Century African-American Religious Music and Interviews

Playing
In the Spirit
From
WPSU

Default-piece-image-1 In the Spirit is a one-hour trip along the gospel highway of African-American religious music hosted by Penn State Professor and author Jerry Zolten. This program explores the rich history of black gospel music and features some of the most important performers in the African-American gospel tradition. Included in the program are ground breaking recordings by the Fisk Jubilee Singers, Blind Willie Johnson, the Fairfield Four, Aretha Franklin, and Mahalia Jackson, as well as the voices of some of the performers themselves. Hear interviews with Isaac "Dickie" Freeman of the Fairfield Four, Ira Tucker of the Dixie Hummingbirds, and many others.

The Undiscovered Explorer: Imagining York

From Claire Schoen | 01:03:13

One hour documentary, narrated by Danny Glover, that explores the making of an American myth.

Glover1_small The Undiscovered Explorer: Imagining York explores the making of an American myth. This hour-long audio documentary, narrated by Danny Glover, is a production of Oregon Public Broadcasting. Through a rich weave of music, interviews, performance and dramatic readings, this program tells the story of York, William Clark's slave and the only African American member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. York's story is both heroic and tragic. He began life as the childhood playmate of Clark, but at age 12 their relationship was transformed into that of master and slave. On the Expedition, York experienced a rare level of freedom and equality, working shoulder to shoulder with white men. Upon their return, the other members of the Corps of Discovery were welcomed home with gifts and praise. York was plunged back into bondage and subservience, which ultimately shattered his life. The facts of York's story are based on fragmentary evidence. Forbidden by law to read and write, York left no written record of his own. We only know about him through the writings and stories of others. Depictions of York have changed through time, always colored by the social era in which they are told. York has been characterized as a valiant hero, an insolent and sulky slave and a happy, dancing darkie. Yet, how York himself really felt about his experiences remains a total mystery. Today, artists and historians continue to give words to this man who has no voice in history. Poetry, opera and rap -- all in York's "voice" -- are being performed as part of the current bicentennial celebration of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. A look at how York is portrayed through history opens the door to many questions about American society at large and about how history is recorded, remembered and created. It is this aspect of York -- the "Invisible Man" who exists only as a reflection of ourselves -- that informs this documentary.

The Afro: Personal Reflections

From David Person | 58:57

A personal and historical look at the Afro hairstyle as a cultural and political phenomenon.

Jay "The Afro: Personal reflections" documents the Afro hairstyle as a cultural and political phenomenon, tracing its history from the early 1960s to the present. It includes commentary from notables including author Ayana Byrd, comedian and activist Dick Gregory, soul singer Mavis Staples, Harvard University psychiatrist Dr. Alvin Poussaint, and singer and actress Abbey Lincoln, one of the first persons in the United States to become well known for her Afro. "The Afro" also tells the story of former New York news anchor Melba Tolliver, who almost lost her job in the 1970s for changing her hairstyle from a straightened perm to a natural Afro. The day she debuted her new look, Tolliver was supposed to be covering the White House wedding of Tricia Nixon, daughter of former President Richard Nixon. Music by James Brown, Parliament, Sly and the Family Stone, Earth, Wind & Fire, Fiona Apple, Rachelle Ferrelle, Ben Harper, Jill Scott and N'Dambi help provide context, along with comedy from Richard Pryor and spoken word from Abbey Lincoln and Emotion Brown. Originally distributed to PRI affiliates around the country in 2005, the version of "The Afro" has been re-edited and contains new material.